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Update. Not a great one.

I FINALLY finished putting this together, with the new clutch hose. It still slips. WTF?

So now I've done about everything that's doable on the hydraulics. Starting to think that maybe I didn't man up enough in the "test it with the slave cylinder removed and see if you can make it slip" test. It doesn't slip really bad, but it slips. And that I may never have had a hydraulic problem at all.

My immediate plan is to try some SeaFoam in the oil for 150 miles or so, then some fresh Honda oil and see if a miracle happens. Perhaps there will get rid of an additive from its prior life (I doubt it) or magically free up the oil regulator (doubt that, too), but it's a cheap lottery ticket.

After that, I'll look for a bigger hammer.
Not sure I understand the SeaFoam thing ??? Are you adding it to the gas ???

I too think you should have double checked for clutch slippage with the slave removed.

I recently did clutch diagnosis on a Wing that had it's clutch repaired at a Honda dealer. I posted that info here.

 

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Discussion Starter · #102 ·
@GoldWingrGreg , SeaFoam in engine oil just prior to an oil change. Allegedly good for getting rid of any moly or other funk that might be in there. Of course, this coming from the guy who figured drilling a whole was good, too.

Thanks for the link. Er, I mean, that's depressing. :(

I think I'll try an oil pressure test. I haven't gotten around to it because I don't have the gadget and I've been busy putting miles on my spare crash-repaired Goldwing.

A few hours ago I checked ticket prices on the auto train. Ha ha. Really.

I didn't think the oil was an issue, but wanted to separate the improbable from the impossible. I put >7,000 miles on it from prior owner with no issues notices, I know what oils I put in, and the P.O. seems savvy motorhead. A delayed slip from an old mistake didn't seem to make sense, and neither did a known intermittent issue passed down the line, with either the mechanics of the bike or the character of the guy.

If I retry the slave cylinder removal and/or driveshaft tests again, I'll have to do a run before I take it off to ensure that I man up enough to slip it with the cylinder in.
 

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@GoldWingrGreg , SeaFoam in engine oil just prior to an oil change. Allegedly good for getting rid of any moly or other funk that might be in there. Of course, this coming from the guy who figured drilling a whole was good, too.
WOW ... I'm speechless.
 

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Sell it! Get out from under it! Pass it on to the next guy, like everyone else does! (Sound familiar?) LOL
 
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@GoldWingrGreg , SeaFoam in engine oil just prior to an oil change. Allegedly good for getting rid of any moly or other funk that might be in there. Of course, this coming from the guy who figured drilling a whole was good, too.

Thanks for the link. Er, I mean, that's depressing. :(

I think I'll try an oil pressure test. I haven't gotten around to it because I don't have the gadget and I've been busy putting miles on my spare crash-repaired Goldwing.

A few hours ago I checked ticket prices on the auto train. Ha ha. Really.

I didn't think the oil was an issue, but wanted to separate the improbable from the impossible. I put >7,000 miles on it from prior owner with no issues notices, I know what oils I put in, and the P.O. seems savvy motorhead. A delayed slip from an old mistake didn't seem to make sense, and neither did a known intermittent issue passed down the line, with either the mechanics of the bike or the character of the guy.

If I retry the slave cylinder removal and/or driveshaft tests again, I'll have to do a run before I take it off to ensure that I man up enough to slip it with the cylinder in.
Sadly, you can‘t measure the oil pressure that really matters back there. You could pull the clutch cover off and drill and tap the machining plug and insert a oil pressure tap to see what it’s doing after the clutch pressure regulator. Honda doesn’t give us any specs on that number.🤬
 

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Discussion Starter · #107 ·
Thanks, @techdude2000 . That saves me a little more pointless tinkering.

If was a truly desperate betting man, I think the best last ditch best longshot is back on the driveshaft.

My working assumption since the hydraulics attempted fixes failed has been that I was too much of a wuss to make it slip in the test running the engine in gear up on the center stand with the slave cylinder off, and that's why after doing almost everything possible to the hyrdraulics there's no change. It's pretty easy to extend that same wussery to the driveshaft test.

Also, it seems a lot easier to believe that a 15 year old rubber insert or whatever it is gave in to the ravages of time and underuse, than that a clutch is gone all of a sudden at <25k. Though just shades of grey, really; the whole thing is tough to fathom.

I'll do some chest bumping with a pal to get manned up for the next test run. Before a couple of beers. Or maybe better after! Ha ha. Making sure there's nothing real valuable in front of the bike when I hammer it.

I sure am glad I put my old crashed wing back together and have a spare ride. But I'd really like to get this slippy one unslipped, since it has ABS and Traxxion.
 

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The easiest and cheapest thing to do right now would probably be try replacing the driveshaft to see what happens
 

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Driveshaft are relatively inexpensive if you have access to one from a trike take off I would just change it going through all that work to test and remove to verify if it’s bad.... change of it turns out that it is good then you have a spare.... For myself it’s worth the money to just replace... that is another option...
 

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Discussion Starter · #111 ·
All good thoughts.

The test idea I cobbled together from earlier advice is to park the bike nose to a wall, rear brake on, plenty of weight on the bike (not a problem!), in 3rd gear, and ease out the clutch a bit. Have a helper feel the U-joint. If the U joint moves and the rear wheel doesn't, the driveshaft is slipping. If the U joint and wheel don't move and the engine stalls, it isn't slipping. As long as the test was manly enough. Without being such an idiot that worse things happen. i.e. if the rear wheel starts moving, I'm a dummy!

If I get any slip there I'll be thrilled. And I'll be on a trike takeoff driveshaft like a hobo on a hamburger.
 

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All good thoughts.

The test idea I cobbled together from earlier advice is to park the bike nose to a wall, rear brake on, plenty of weight on the bike (not a problem!), in 3rd gear, and ease out the clutch a bit. Have a helper feel the U-joint. If the U joint moves and the rear wheel doesn't, the driveshaft is slipping. If the U joint and wheel don't move and the engine stalls, it isn't slipping. As long as the test was manly enough. Without being such an idiot that worse things happen. i.e. if the rear wheel starts moving, I'm a dummy!

If I get any slip there I'll be thrilled. And I'll be on a trike takeoff driveshaft like a hobo on a hamburger.
NO!

If it moves, somebody could get hurt.

Mark the 2 haves of the shaft with a paint marker instead.
Do whatever you've done in the paste that indicated there is driveline slippage. After you've felt the slippage, inspect the markings on the driveshaft halves.


Sorry for being like that.
Spent some time in driveline business and have heard of lots of 'events'.
Lost a friend to an agricultural driveline.

It's just not worth the risk of having someone 'feel' the u-joint.
After they say 'ouch' it's too late...
 

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Just throwing this out there... if you have another GW, the slave and MC could be removed from both bikes and swapped (IIRC, this can be accomplished without even opening the systems(?)) and you will immediately know if you’ve got a mechanical issue or a hydraulic issue? If the problem switches to the spare bike, youve got your answer as to the system. If it stays, you’ve narrowed it a clutch, oil assist or driveline issue. It’s just what I’d do...
 

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Discussion Starter · #114 ·
Swapping slaves requires opening and re-filling on both bikes. Twice, if you put them back.

I've been busy riding the spare Goldwing, running a few MSF classes, and going to be moving my daughter to Cincinnati.

@Farmguy 's cautions duly noted, my next/last steps will be to test driveshaft then maybe get on the auto train. I'm convinced at this point the hydraulics are not the problem. I certainly am part of the problem.

+1 on the driveshafts are cheaper than opening the rear end twice.
 

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Swapping slaves requires opening and re-filling on both bikes. Twice, if you put them back.

I've been busy riding the spare Goldwing, running a few MSF classes, and going to be moving my daughter to Cincinnati.

@Farmguy 's cautions duly noted, my next/last steps will be to test driveshaft then maybe get on the auto train. I'm convinced at this point the hydraulics are not the problem. I certainly am part of the problem.

+1 on the driveshafts are cheaper than opening the rear end twice.
Swap engine from crash bike.
 
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