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Question, I'll be charging a 13" HP split computer and a cell phone while riding... How long would it take to charge a 19V computer with a 12 to 19.5 v step up cig lighter plug? PS Camping no power, programing a Zumo 665 with the computer.

If I turn the MC off how long can the Wing battery go on charging/running the computer before I run it down to a non start situation?
 

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IronMan
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LOADED QUESTION . HOW GOOD IS BATTERY ? I CHARGE MINE ALL THE TIME ON TRIPS N NEVER TIMED = NOT MUCH HELP :shrug: WHEN I CAMP USUALLY YOU CAN GO TO OFFICE N LEAVE THERE TO CHARGE - IN BATHROOMS WHILE DOIN YOUR BUSINESS CAN PUT ON CHARGE . SURE ELECTRICAL GURU'S WILL CHIME IN TO HELP .
 

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GL1800 Doctor
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Question, I'll be charging a 13" HP split computer and a cell phone while riding... How long would it take to charge a 19V computer with a 12 to 19.5 v step up cig lighter plug? PS Camping no power, programing a Zumo 665 with the computer.

If I turn the MC off how long can the Wing battery go on charging/running the computer before I run it down to a non start situation?
If it is using a 90 watt charger and an inverter, the battery will not last long without the engine running.
 

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Leaving the cell phone in a drawer at home (where they all belong IMO) will lighten your charging load somewhat. .....just sayin'.:lol:
 

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Charging Widgets with Your Bike

OP plans to use a step-up voltage regulator, not the normal laptop charger plugged into an inverter. More efficient. Step-up voltage regulators are readily available, and fairly cheap. Easy to solder up the connectors for those with an electronics background.

90 watts at 19.5 volts = 4.7 amps. A fully charged 6 Amp-Hour motorcycle battery (some are 12 AHr) can provide 4.7 amps for 1 hour and 16 minutes, with nothing left to start the motorcycle. 4.7 amps is a lot of current to ask a 6 AHr battery to provide; so, it's going to heat up and become less efficient (providing less than 6 AHr of energy because so much is lost as heat). It can even destroy the battery or cause it to explode. That step-up voltage regulator needs to have a current limit of 600 miliamps to keep the battery within safe limits.

Running it down to a no-start situation? My answer is 25 minutes at 4.7 amps, which will consume 2 of the battery's 6 AHrs of energy. If the step-up voltage regulator has a 600 ma limit, then my answer becomes 3 hours and 20 minutes. Lots of variables make this a wild-ass guess. If you idle the bike while charging, that would be better for the battery, but I wouldn't run the computer at the same time (it won't like all the power-production noise).

Might be better to look hard for an AC socket and use the laptop's normal charger.
 

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Running computer while on a trip

OP plans to use a step-up voltage regulator, not the normal laptop charger plugged into an inverter. More efficient. Step-up voltage regulators are readily available, and fairly cheap. Easy to solder up the connectors for those with an electronics background.

90 watts at 19.5 volts = 4.7 amps. A fully charged 6 Amp-Hour motorcycle battery (some are 12 AHr) can provide 4.7 amps for 1 hour and 16 minutes, with nothing left to start the motorcycle. 4.7 amps is a lot of current to ask a 6 AHr battery to provide; so, it's going to heat up and become less efficient (providing less than 6 AHr of energy because so much is lost as heat). It can even destroy the battery or cause it to explode. That step-up voltage regulator needs to have a current limit of 600 miliamps to keep the battery within safe limits.

Running it down to a no-start situation? My answer is 25 minutes at 4.7 amps, which will consume 2 of the battery's 6 AHrs of energy. If the step-up voltage regulator has a 600 ma limit, then my answer becomes 3 hours and 20 minutes. Lots of variables make this a wild-ass guess. If you idle the bike while charging, that would be better for the battery, but I wouldn't run the computer at the same time (it won't like all the power-production noise).

Might be better to look hard for an AC socket and use the laptop's normal charger.
A couple of things to consider:
1) Most 13 inch computers do not have a 90w supply. I do not know about the OP's particular machine, but 90w would surprise me.
2) The GW battery is an 18 AH battery not a 6 or 12.

I think you can easily get enough charge in the laptop batteries during the day to do your route planning at night without having to use the bike's batteries to power the computer at night. If your want to watch several hours of movies on the computer at night, that would be different.
 

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I travelled with my 17" laptop last year. I charged it during the day from a 12v outlet I installed in the trunk. I don't know the correct names for these things, but I think it's an inverter I used - a thing that looks like power bar that plugs into a cigarette 12v plug (bought it with the computer for travelling in the car). The computer's normal charging plug then plugs into that thing. No problem getting it fully charged during a riding day (and it didn't seem to heat up much in the trunk which had been a concern).

But I didn't dare run it from the bike once I stopped (other than a few minutes getting gas) because I figured it took a lot of power. The response above shows it might have been OK for a couple of hours, but I wasn't going to chance it.

Hope that helps.
 

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GL1800 Doctor
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A couple of things to consider:
1) Most 13 inch computers do not have a 90w supply. I do not know about the OP's particular machine, but 90w would surprise me.
2) The GW battery is an 18 AH battery not a 6 or 12.

I think you can easily get enough charge in the laptop batteries during the day to do your route planning at night without having to use the bike's batteries to power the computer at night. If your want to watch several hours of movies on the computer at night, that would be different.
Yep, just checked my HP envy X2 and it's power supply is only a 20 watt, so it could run it for quite a while before the battery would die. My older laptop used a 90 watt and it could drain the battery pretty quickly. If his 13" is like mine, the 2 laptop battery's will run it for at least 10 hours while watching movies.
 

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Car and motorcycle batteries are not deep cycle batteries and are not designed to be used as camping power supplies. Every time you discharge the battery, you shorten its life.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Laptop charging

THanks for the replys. I'll be on the road for 10 weeks in the EU. I was trying to avoid to many extras. I looked at the inverter, a power hog and its larger that I would like. The 12v to 19.5 step up looks like a standard lighter plug, small and just gets warm when charging without any fan. I'm running charging tests with HP 2x battery charging with MC only. I'll see how long it take to fully charge.....
 

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I wanted to add more to this topic the other day, but I have been pretty heavily doped up on narcotics lately, making it difficult to think clearly. :lol: I hope this is still helpful.

Even though I question whether it is a good idea to charge a laptop or power the laptop without the alternator running, the following should give you a good idea of how much drain you are looking at.

A 12 volt adapter is nearly identical in design to a 120VAC adapter, except for the input circuitry. Both the adapters use switching power supplies to generate the regulated 19VDC that the laptop needs. That means that you can estimate charge time with the DC adapter by using the AC adapter in your home. The charge times will be the same.

Many people make the mistake of using the rating of the adapter to calculate the power drain on the battery. That rating is nothing more than the power supply's capacity, not the amount of wattage that will be drawn by the laptop or its battery. The laptop will only draw a percentage of that power.

To determine how much power the battery will draw, look at the battery's amp/hr rating, and then add 25% or so for charging losses and power consumed by the adapter. To determine how much the laptop draws, look at the power rating on the bottom case of the laptop. Keep in mind that you can lessen this load significantly by using the laptop's energy saving features and keeping the display brightness down.

When power draw is a concern, such as in this case, whenever possible, use the adapter that was designed for that laptop, or one whose specs match the factory adapter. Many aftermarket adapters are far more powerful than they need to be. Using a 90W adapter when you only need a 40W adapter will cause you to waste power, because higher wattage power supplies waste more power internally.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks Larry, I love a good Electronics lesson. I'm going to take a picture of all my electronics before and after the trip, just to see what I really needed and what I pitched. That goes for all my gear generally after ten weeks I'll have some trad ups..
 
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