GL1800Riders Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this month's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,984 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A new study, read it here, that looked at glancing and stopping behavior of the same drivers in cars and on bikes, has a startling conclusion:

We as motorcycle riders, suck!

----We look down at the road too much, and can't seem to get our eyes up.

----We don't stop at stop signs, and therefore miss seeing dangers approaching.

----When we get to intersections, we don't take care to look for last-minute danger before pulling out.

----When we do pull out, we daudle around looking at the road surface instead of looking well up the road and and getting on with the turn.

They put it nicer than that, of course, but the bottom line is that we have plenty of room for improvement. Too long to post here, but the article is free to read. Comment below.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
Interesting read but I found one telling oversight.....or perhaps I just missed it buried in all the formal language. Maybe we watch the road surface because we know we are far more likely to washout in the sand/gravel/plastic paint on a corner then we are to be struck by a vehicle?
 
  • Like
Reactions: biggersm

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,984 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ayup. I think you are right about that. I also think that is why we EASE out around corners. Both of these things are grind, normal survival instincts, until they aren't. I COULD be watching the road for sand and miss that blue hair backing out in her Buick. I COULD creep out from the corner and be visual scanning for acorns or rocks when I should have been watching for the Corvette zipping over the rise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
Riders are taught to look through the turn when turning, or at lest most riders who where smart enough to take basic riding class. This leads to tunnel vision for you are focusing on your exit point. I was taught to do late entry approach. I call it vectoring where my eyesight changes as A I go through the turn. Allowing me to view more of the curve and surrounding traffic.

A lot of this is mute due to cell phone use by drivers and now riders. Way too many are looking into a little box that controls their lives. Now every rider must ride more aware of the dangers around us more today than ever. Rider safe but ride aware!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
A couple of points, one the test bike was a 650R Kawasaki Ninja with a forward leaning riding position, two the rider/driver took 10 laps around a housing development which I believe is under construction, five laps with the car and five with the bike. It appears the point of the study was to gauge the number of glances to the ground for the rider versus the driver.

My concern is for the 39% of completed stops versus rolling stops.
If the individuals drove five laps and then rode the remaining five in a deserted housing development without any traffic there could be some complacency and lack of concern over a speeding car that is unlikely to appear. Also a new rider of a crotch rocket, he/she would be more concerned about riding the bike versus non-existent traffic in a deserted housing development.

per Google Earth Pro 3 of 141 home sites have been built. The main roads appear to be paved and there are clear line of sights to alert one to other traffic. Verde Canyon Dr leads from Hwy 68 which is a 65 mph highway very high speed downhill and slower going up the steep upgrade.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,685 Posts
I didn't bother reading the study after the OP said we don't look carefully at intersections and then we dawdle getting up to speed. Neither of these are things I do, so just like looking at dress patterns, I don't read things that don't pertain to me at all. We are all responsible for our own safety. Ride like your life depends on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,896 Posts
I can see where a lot of riders (especially new/inexperienced ones) spend too much time looking at the road surface directly in front of them, and not enough time taking in everything else they should be looking at. The are working so hard to just turn the thing that they are oblivious to anything else. I'll do a quick scan of the road surface (looking for oil, sand, etc.) as I come to a corner, then it's all eyes on the other guys. Point your eyes and head where you want to go and the bike will follow. Fixate on that small patch of road 10-20 feet in front of you and the bike will seeming refuse to turn no mater how much you want it to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
I can't say if my wheels stop turning at a stop sign but I can say that I get both feet down (even if that is a quick heel to toe boot roll on the ground). I have discussed with some Law Enforcement professionals that some look for this.

I think I read and react to the road better than most cagers; sometime up to a half mile or more. I'm reacting to traffic signs and signals farther down the road than most (or maybe people are just stupid and inefficient). When I see a yellow light I will let up on the throttle and ease up to where I need to stop (if I need to stop) while others will blow past me just to brake real hard at the last couple seconds. Sometimes my delayed method is more efficient. I just glide by them and get my green. Slower when coming up to a red light slower can be faster.

I will admit that when I get a green light I accelerate faster than most cagers.

I saw they use a new more simple acronym of "SEE". I guess SIPDE was too tough for some?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
Scanning the road surface is a good thing on the bike. On a morning commute, 5:30 AM, dark, I came to one of my usual street corners. As I slowed for the blinking red traffic signal I scanned the road surface in the right turn. To my surprise, it was covered with unopened soda cans. There must have a couple of cases worth, apparently fell off another vehicle earlier.


You never know...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
A few years ago I did my own crash study For Pennsylvania.

2008-2012 Pa Motorcycle crashes - 19,636
Single unit crashes - 10,098
Multi Unit crashes - 9,538

Multi Unit Crash Breakdown by prime factor in Crash
Multi Unit crashes - 9,538
Other Unit as Prime factor - 5,328 (55.9%)
Motorcycle as prime factor - 3,830 (40.2%)
Others: Pedestrians, vehicle failure, Unknown Unit, Environmental -380 (3.9%)

Summary:
10,098 Single unit crashes
3,830 Multi unit crashes where motorcycle was prime factor in crash.
Total 13,928 Motorcycle Crashes that the motorcyclist had the ability to prevent.
13,928/19,636 = 70.9% of all motorcycle crashes in PA over five years the motorcyclist was the prime factor.

5,328 Multi unit crashes with other unit as Prime factor in crash.
5,328/19,636 = 27% of all motorcycle crashes in PA over five years the other unit was the prime factor.

Watch for motorcycle signs send a great message .... that address 27% of our crashes. Only we can address the 70.9%.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,321 Posts
I didn't bother reading the study after the OP said we don't look carefully at intersections and then we dawdle getting up to speed. Neither of these are things I do, so just like looking at dress patterns, I don't read things that don't pertain to me at all. We are all responsible for our own safety. Ride like your life depends on it.
I agree on the above 100% There are way more items that we as riders must consider and react to that may mean our demise that may not even cause a slight skin discoloration in a car. So, yes; Ride like your life depends on it.
 
Joined
·
47 Posts
I like looking for lost hardware, tools (usually construction tools and safety gear) as well as grease etc. As for the cagers I look at the driver for cluelessness, age (just out of diapers and ready for depends-sorry guys), as well as dents and multi-colored repairs. And I look for escape angles. And I watch the mirrors. Dirt bikes are so much more relaxing compared to this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,990 Posts
A few years ago I did my own crash study For Pennsylvania.

2008-2012 Pa Motorcycle crashes - 19,636
Single unit crashes - 10,098
Multi Unit crashes - 9,538

Multi Unit Crash Breakdown by prime factor in Crash
Multi Unit crashes - 9,538
Other Unit as Prime factor - 5,328 (55.9%)
Motorcycle as prime factor - 3,830 (40.2%)
Others: Pedestrians, vehicle failure, Unknown Unit, Environmental -380 (3.9%)

Summary:
10,098 Single unit crashes
3,830 Multi unit crashes where motorcycle was prime factor in crash.
Total 13,928 Motorcycle Crashes that the motorcyclist had the ability to prevent.
13,928/19,636 = 70.9% of all motorcycle crashes in PA over five years the motorcyclist was the prime factor.

5,328 Multi unit crashes with other unit as Prime factor in crash.
5,328/19,636 = 27% of all motorcycle crashes in PA over five years the other unit was the prime factor.

Watch for motorcycle signs send a great message .... that address 27% of our crashes. Only we can address the 70.9%.
I think that those stats mirrors what's happening nationally. I have looked at motorcyle accident statistics for several years now and is always fascinated at how large the stats are for rider cause, especially speeding,intoxication and rider error. There is always a call for more safety equipment on motorcycles, but it's little chance they will overcome measures we must take ourselves.
 
  • Like
Reactions: shojac
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top