GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
478 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
doing some thinking about a trike conversion and wondered how they handle heavy cross winds[the kind you have to lean into on 2 wheels]
and passing semi's in the same stuff?



John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Just finished a trip out west and we encounted cross wind upwards of 50mph on I-40. At time it was ok. We were towing a Champion trailer loaded down. I think it handles the cross winds much better than a two wheeler. Just my input.
Mike:yes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
I feel the 2 wheeler handled the cross winds better than my trike. When on a bike I just loosened up my grip when the winds got strong and was OK. More surfaces on the trike to catch the wind. Have to exert more pressure to keep the trike straight. JMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
Cross wind handling is one of the few GL1800 negative traits. Partly due to the large amount of plastic but I believe mostly because it sets low to the ground so air can not pass under it easily so the bike gets pushed around.

Now, add the trike kit. You just added more sail and in my case because I also chose to add Auqa-Shields even more restriction to air flow under the bike.

Does the side winds blow me around -- You Bet. Is is unmanagable -- NOPE. Gusting West Texas winds have done their best to toss me off the trike or into the bar ditch but neither has happen. About 200 miles of that and believe me you will be ready for a rest though. :shock::shock::shock:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,885 Posts
It also helps if you have the comfort package with aquashields to open your foot vents. Going through Wyoming from Denver up to S. Dakota the crosswinds are pretty bad also. We had the windshield vent open ,the foot vents, and the bakers turned parallel with the fairing to act like rudders with all of the crosswinds. But opening the foot vents and the windshield vent seems to relieve the pressure on the front and bottom of the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
I just completed the Run to the Wall ride. Tail winds,crosswinds and head winds. The trike was a rock. I got blown around on the bike a little bit. My friends on a Voyager were taking up the whole lane at times. The mileage was 6500.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
Heavy cross winds make for a tighter posterior.........

That post is just plain mean. :eek:4: See my post on undesirable topic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
478 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the replies.I guess I'll try to find someone around here that will let me take their's for a ride in the wind and then check my posterior [:>)


John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
When I went out to S.C and picked up the trike and road it back to Oregon I took the southern routs and had cross winds stong enough that troopers had to lead cars through a stretch single file down the freeway.
At one point after a couple days of EXTREAMLY high winds I simply pulled off the road because I was puckered so tight. I just told the wife I was checking the bag strapped on the back. I didn't want to let her know that I was just tuckered from fighting the wind :shrug:.
At times it simply moved me a entire lane.
Now I have 20,000 miles under my belt on the trike and know how she acts so it's not as big a deal. You will get used to it as well.
 
B

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Thanks for the replies.I guess I'll try to find someone around here that will let me take their's for a ride in the wind and then check my posterior [:>)


John
I might let you take my trike but the Posterior check is out of the question. :nojoke:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,811 Posts
I think crooswinds are worse on a trike...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
crosswinds

On a 2 wheeler, you have to lean the bike into the blowing wind. It take a while to get used to that. With a trike, you don't lean the bike or sit sideways into the wind, but you feel the crosswinds because you are more upright and there is more surface area to catch the wind. It will move you around within the lane, but in my opinion, is easier to manage because you feel more secure on 3 wheels instead of 2 wheels. You remove the balancing problem with the trike.
Your arms and hands will feel the strain of " push-pull" steering on the trike, but it is worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
937 Posts
We hit a long section (2 1/2 hours) of 50 gusting to 70 mph crosswinds in Utah with sand. The trike was great - much steadier than two wheels. A lot of bikes were under the overpasses to get away from the wind and sand.



We ducked in next to this guy and stayed in his wind shadow. It was nice and cozy until I had to get behind him to let cars pass.

 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top