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Discussion Starter #1
We're planning a trip to northern Minnesota in June. I'm wondering what the best route across northern Montana and N. Dakota would be. Tentatively our route takes us from Missoula to Great Falls on Mt. Rte 200, then up to Havre then staying on Hwy 2 across the rest of Montana, to Williston, ND, across ND to Minnesota and then most of the way across Minnesota. Looking at the road map, it looks like staying on Montana Rte. 200 from Missoula to Great Falls to Williston might be a possibility. Any ideas? Thanx in advance.
 

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Couple places we've been & enjoyed, are North Dakotas Badlands West end of the state, South of Williston. (Teddy Roosevelt National Park)....much different than South Dakotas! Others are the Turtle Mountains, near Bottineau. & close by the International Peace Garden, on the US Canada border.

I rode through ND in June, a few years ago & although I don't remember the name of the crops, there were miles of purple blooming "something" made for a nice enjoyable ride.


I'm sure someone from ND will have more to suggest.

Ride Safe,
 

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If was driving across ND I would take the northern route Hwy 5 west to
East more to look at. But thats me it's two lane but wide open space
 

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Ahhh....now you're talking about my neck of the woods! I've been on all of the east-west routes numerous times.

Option #3: US2, because other than the spectacles of Glacier National Park, it's nearly a thousand miles of mostly laser straight and flat roads across the eastern 2/3 of MT, ND and into MN. Yaaawwwwnnnn!

Option #2: I90/94. Actually, I90/94 (it's called I90 west of Billings and I94 east of there) is a nice ride across MT....it's one of the better slab rides in North America even though it is rarely twisty. The scenery is nice all the way into western ND. Be forewarned, however, because once I94 goes east of Belfield, ND, it's just another typical boring plains superslab. If you really need to cover a lot of miles in a hurry, this route is the way to go.

Option #1: MT200, ND200 and MN200. Route # coordination, what a concept! I've talked to riders who think this is the most awful road they've ever ridden.....to each his own but I must disagree. To really appreciate this road, all you have to do is ride the alternatives a few times. This route is one of the least-spoiled highways in America. It's best to ride it ASAP because sure as hell the DOT's are pecking away at it and making "improvements" on new sections every year. East from Missoula, you'll encounter great mountain riding until you reach Great Falls. GF has the C.M. Russell Museum which is, IMO well worth the stop. East of GF, the road goes through some of the most sparsely populated and isolated areas of the continental USA and that's what makes it a better ride than the alternatives. There are only occasional small towns and sparse traffic all the way into MN. It's true that you won't find awesome mountain scenery once you're east of GF but you will be on a road that retains some of the genuine old west character and not touristy hype. Just one safety advisory, any road in eastern MT and western ND will be extremely dangerous for night riding due to large numbers of deer. Use your PIAA's!

Another possibility is to include parts of US12 in your plans. This route is similar to #200 in western and central MT and very enjoyable as well.

I hope this helps.

Ride safe!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hmmmm, lots to consider, but I've got plenty of time to pour over the Rand McNally Mapbook. I sure do appreciate the input.
 

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Don't think I have much to add but I do recommend rt 5. Its a peaceful ride and I would do it again tomorrow. I stopped at the Peace Garden and really enjoyed that then on to Minot and to Glacier via rt 2. Did it late August last year and the weather was good.

AG GL

The crops I was amazed by were sunflowers. Thousands and thousands of acres of 'em all over North Dakota!!
 

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Sleddog said:
I rode through ND in June, a few years ago & although I don't remember the name of the crops, there were miles of purple blooming "something" made for a nice enjoyable ride.
The "purple" blooming crop is flax.

I agree with the others who recommend ND5 across the northern tier of ND. IMO, northern ND in mid to late June rivals New England's fall colors. You should see it from the air, it looks like a multi-colored patchwork quilt!

Here's today's agronomy lesson:

Blue = flax.

Yellow = canola, sunflowers, sweet clover, mustard.

White = beans, potatoes.

Green = wheat, barley, oats, corn, etc.
 

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Gizmo said:
Sleddog said:
I rode through ND in June, a few years ago & although I don't remember the name of the crops, there were miles of purple blooming "something" made for a nice enjoyable ride.
The "purple" blooming crop is flax.

I agree with the others who recommend ND5 across the northern tier of ND. IMO, northern ND in mid to late June rivals New England's fall colors. You should see it from the air, it looks like a multi-colored patchwork quilt!

Here's today's agronomy lesson:

Blue = flax.

Yellow = canola, sunflowers, sweet clover, mustard.

White = beans, potatoes.

Green = wheat, barley, oats, corn, etc.
Ok... i know what all the others are.. but what is FLAX used for ?

cosmic
 

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If your starting out in Missoula, spend a couple of hours and ride up to Lolo Pass on Highway 12. It's a great ride for twistys and scenery. It's about a 50 mile ride one way to the top of the Pass, fun evening ride. Keep your eyes open for deer and moose closer to the top of the Pass.
 

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Here's a copy and paste straight out of Wikipedia.

"Flax is grown both for seed and for its fibers. Various parts of the plant have been used to make fabric, dye, paper, medicines, fishing nets and soap. It is also grown as an ornamental plant in gardens, as flax is one of the few plant species that is capable of producing truly blue flowers (most "blue" flowers are really shades of purple), although not all flax varieties produce blue flowers.

Flax seed
The seeds a vegetable oil known as linseed oil or flaxseed oil. It is one of the oldest commercial oils and solvent-processed flax seed oil has been used for centuries as a drying oil in painting and varnishing. Flax seeds come in two basic varieties; brown and yellow (also referred to as golden). Although brown flax can be consumed and has been for thousands of years, it is better known as an ingredient in paints, fibre and cattle feed. Brown and yellow flax have similar nutritional values and equal amounts of short-chain omega-3 fatty acids. The exception is a type of yellow flax called solin which is very low in omega-3 and has a completely different oil profile. A number of studies have shown that people have a very hard time absorbing the Omega-3 from flaxseed oil compared to oily fish (see Fish and plants as a source of Omega-3 for more).

A North Dakota State University research project led to the creation of a new variety of the yellow flax seed called "Omega"[2]. This new variety was created primarily as a food source and has a more pleasant nutty-buttery flavour than the brown variety and retains a comparable level of the beneficial Omega-3 oil."


Flax is good stuff!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Big Sky Winger said:
If your starting out in Missoula, spend a couple of hours and ride up to Lolo Pass on Highway 12. It's a great ride for twistys and scenery. It's about a 50 mile ride one way to the top of the Pass, fun evening ride. Keep your eyes open for deer and moose closer to the top of the Pass.

That's the way we're coming from--over Hwy 12 from west to east. It's a spectacular ride.
 

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I would also recommend some good wet weather clothing. June can be a pretty wet month around here. It is also not uncommon to run into a little snow in the higher elevations.
 
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