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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I have a 21 Goldwing with Roadsmith conversion, I am trying to decrease my crosswind, do you think if I remove my running board, will that will help. As you can see in my pic, they are large running boards with lots of plastic. I will appreciate your knowledge
 

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Hi, I have a 21 Goldwing with Roadsmith conversion, I am trying to decrease my crosswind, do you think if I remove my running board, will that will help. As you can see in my pic, they are large running boards with lots of plastic. I will appreciate your knowledge
You are joking right?
 

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Maybe it is the way you ask the question that keeps me from understanding. Are you trying to decrease the amount of crosswind you are generating or amount of crosswind that is affecting your trike? Its a trike. That big ol' tail end on a trike has got to be catching lots of wind. I'm sure a trike is is affected by crosswinds like any vehicle but I don't see how you can reduce the effects of them.
Have you been told that the running boards are increasing the effects of the crosswinds you are feeling?
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes it is a trike I am trying anything I can to decrease the crosswind on mine trike. I was told removing the large running boards will resolve this issue (probably 75%). I was asking to other trike members how they decreased the crosswind. Maybe a different non oem windshield. Thank you.
 

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Now I understand.
How difficult would it be to remove the running boards? Maybe try it and see how you like it. Or, ride someone else's Roadsmith trike with that does not have the running boards. Don't all Roadsmith's come with running boards?
 

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I posted a side photo a couple weeks ago showing my opinion on why the Wing is vulnerable to crosswind issues. There is no gap anywhere for the air to go. On most bikes there is some amount of open areas for wind to vent through, on the Wing not the case. Trike or no Trike, those boards are most likely not the culprit. The bike catches all the wind like a sail. The HD has gaps all around the engine for air to funnel through.
2018-Honda-Gold-Wing-First-Look-Fast-Facts-5.jpg

Screenshot_20210503-175400_Gallery.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Now I understand.
How difficult would it be to remove the running boards? Maybe try it and see how you like it. Or, ride someone else's Roadsmith trike with that does not have the running boards. Don't all Roadsmith's come with running boards?
I believe not all Roadsmith comes with running boards. I asked for anyone that experience the same issue I have. I really enjoy my Goldwing, but I will really love this trike when riding in the highway and passing big semi’s. 🤔
 

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Maybe it is the way you ask the question that keeps me from understanding. Are you trying to decrease the amount of crosswind you are generating or amount of crosswind that is affecting your trike? Its a trike. That big ol' tail end on a trike has got to be catching lots of wind. I'm sure a trike is is affected by crosswinds like any vehicle but I don't see how you can reduce the effects of them.
Have you been told that the running boards are increasing the effects of the crosswinds you are feeling?
I agree that the mass of the trike kit is grabbing more wind and the running boards act like funnel. Just like a passenger will add to the crosswind resistance from the side. Being a trike, it should be more stable because of the two rear wheels.
 

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Hi, I have a 21 Goldwing with Roadsmith conversion, I am trying to decrease my crosswind, do you think if I remove my running board, will that will help. As you can see in my pic, they are large running boards with lots of plastic. I will appreciate your knowledge
Short answer: no.

Long answer: Crosswind effect is the result of the pressure of wind against the side of your bike. This pressure is 0.00256 * V^2 (where V is the velocity of the wind in miles per hour, and this value is squared). Thus, for 1 square foot of area in a 40 MPH wind, the pressure is (0.00256 * 40 * 40)4 pounds. An estimate of the cross-sectional area of the Wing (about 7 feet long, and 2 feet tall), would be 14 square feet, assume a rider is about another 4 square feet, so a total of about 72 pounds of sideways force.

Now look at your trike; the cross sectional area of your trike is really not affected by the running boards. The larger rear end is the issue. Look only at the side profile and see how much - if any - it changed from stock. The majority of your change is in the rear, where the dual rear wheels are located. That is the source of the issue, not the floorboards.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I posted a side photo a couple weeks ago showing my opinion on why the Wing is vulnerable to crosswind issues. There is no gap anywhere for the air to go. On most bikes there is some amount of open areas for wind to vent through, on the Wing not the case. Trike or no Trike, those boards are most likely not the culprit. The bike catches all the wind like a sail.
View attachment 382980
Understood your post but if removing the running board will help 30% or 40% I will be happy with the results. 😊
Short answer: no.

Long answer: Crosswind effect is the result of the pressure of wind against the side of your bike. This pressure is 0.00256 * V^2 (where V is the velocity of the wind in miles per hour, and this value is squared). Thus, for 1 square foot of area in a 40 MPH wind, the pressure is (0.00256 * 40 * 40)4 pounds. An estimate of the cross-sectional area of the Wing (about 7 feet long, and 2 feet tall), would be 14 square feet, assume a rider is about another 4 square feet, so a total of about 72 pounds of sideways force.

Now look at your trike; the cross sectional area of your trike is really not affected by the running boards. The larger rear end is the issue. Look only at the side profile and see how much - if any - it changed from stock. The majority of your change is in the rear, where the dual rear wheels are located. That is the source of the issue, not the floorboards.
thank you then back to square one lol
 

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I posted a side photo a couple weeks ago showing my opinion on why the Wing is vulnerable to crosswind issues. There is no gap anywhere for the air to go. On most bikes there is some amount of open areas for wind to vent through, on the Wing not the case. Trike or no Trike, those boards are most likely not the culprit. The bike catches all the wind like a sail. The HD has gaps all around the engine for air to funnel through.
So what you're saying is, I need to buy a 3" diameter drill bit and drill cross-wind speed-holes through the bike? How do you recommend I get the bike up on the drill press?

😁😁😁
 

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I see no wind effect with my running boards on my Roadsmith. I've never heard of anything like this anywhere.
 

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I also have a Roadsmith trike........... The running boards MAKE NO DIFFERENCE with the crosswinds..............Your bike is beautiful, don't ruin it's looks, keep the boards on, I had the same (actually more) before I triked her out...

Ronnie
 
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Good responses so far, but let's get to the meat of the matter...

<...>I am trying to decrease my crosswind, do you think if I remove my running board, will that will help. <...>
<...>I really enjoy my Goldwing, but I will really love this trike when riding in the highway and passing big semi’s. 🤔
"Turbulence" is what you are dealing with, based on the writings above.

So, for @wengerda - did you do a lot of riding on two-wheels before you got this trike?

As you might remember, when you were a 'dart' that turbulent air could be moved thru by weight shifting and other means as you zipped by those slower vehicles on the highway. Yes, even on a bike that might have a 'barn door' on the front, like the GL1500's for example. Look at the front of those bikes, then imagine a sheet of OSB or plywood standing beside it for a comparison! Quite a lot of area, isn't it?

With a trike, now you've probably doubled that area you're trying to punch thru, all while moving at 70+ MPH.

How is 'steering rake' adjusted for on the new models of trikes?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
C5EB3BDE-4C04-47CC-BCA0-216DB43B8CBD.jpeg

Good responses so far, but let's get to the meat of the matter...



"Turbulence" is what you are dealing with, based on the writings above.

So, for @wengerda - did you do a lot of riding on two-wheels before you got this trike?

As you might remember, when you were a 'dart' that turbulent air could be moved thru by weight shifting and other means as you zipped by those slower vehicles on the highway. Yes, even on a bike that might have a 'barn door' on the front, like the GL1500's for example. Look at the front of those bikes, then imagine a sheet of OSB or plywood standing beside it for a comparison! Quite a lot of area, isn't it?

With a trike, now you've probably doubled that area you're trying to punch thru, all while moving at 70+ MPH.

How is 'steering rake' adjusted for on the new models of trikes?
The rake is set to standard.
 

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my previous riding for the past 7 years was a Harley trike with no crosswind issues.
Looking at that photo, those fenders over the rear tires sure are adding a bit to that cross sectional area.
 
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