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Discussion Starter #1
Just got my Big Bike parts Cruise Wing oversize kickstand today.

Works brilliantly with the Traxxion fork springs fitted.
My original stand left the bike with a large lean and a tiny foot print that was stable only on concrete.

This thing looks like it could handle a grass surface.

I had to drill a new hole for the switch as it looks as though it was set up for the GL1500/6.
No spring was provided so I had to shorten the original spring by forming new hooks at the top. (just cut the old ones off and used a pair of long nose pliers to remake the hooks.

Trev.
 

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Make sure it won't make contact with the road on left turns!!! There was a write up in here a while ago and his hit the road and he almost had a accident. :shock:


Patrick
 

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Auswing said:
Just got my Big Bike parts Cruise Wing oversize kickstand today.

Works brilliantly with the Traxxion fork springs fitted.
My original stand left the bike with a large lean and a tiny foot print that was stable only on concrete.

This thing looks like it could handle a grass surface.

I had to drill a new hole for the switch as it looks as though it was set up for the GL1500/6.
No spring was provided so I had to shorten the original spring by forming new hooks at the top. (just cut the old ones off and used a pair of long nose pliers to remake the hooks.

Trev.
pics please
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I will take some over the next few days and post them here.

Trev.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Bluewoo said:
Make sure it won't make contact with the road on left turns!!! There was a write up in here a while ago and his hit the road and he almost had a accident. :shock:


Patrick
Thanks for the warning. I think with the Traxxion front springs the clearance is fine. The bike is about 1" higher at the front and around 1/2" at the seat. So the longer stand works well. Going riding this weekend so will get a buddy to watch the clearance for me. (we both have CB fitted so he can call it to me).

Trev.
 

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Auswing said:
Bluewoo said:
Make sure it won't make contact with the road on left turns!!! There was a write up in here a while ago and his hit the road and he almost had a accident. :shock:


Patrick
Thanks for the warning. I think with the Traxxion front springs the clearance is fine. The bike is about 1" higher at the front and around 1/2" at the seat. So the longer stand works well. Going riding this weekend so will get a buddy to watch the clearance for me. (we both have CB fitted so he can call it to me).

Trev.
thanks, I'll be patiently waiting
 

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Discussion Starter #7

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Hey Trev,
Here's something to think about and check the situation with your Duck foot side stand.
Back in 02, I installed the progressive stuff on my new wing. I also installed the Duck foot stand.
It did seem to lift the bike a little but I also noticed a disturbing condition.
This could get a little long but I want to share what I found and why it seemed very important to me.
As we all know, in addition to being designed to hold the bike up, it is designed to "keep the bike from rolling forward".
This is accomplished by the geometry of the mount and pivot of the stand.
When the stand is in it's full down position, it projects forward from it's mounting point.
With this condition, for the bike to roll forward, the weight of the bike has to be lifted some,
so the kickstand can rotate past the pivot point.
Since the bike usually will not "rise up" without some external added incentive,
it will tend NOT to roll forward off the side stand.
Now, if all that makes sense, here's an interesting part of the Duck foot stand geometry.
When the bike is resting on the stand, you will notice that the only part,
of the bottom of the foot, that is resting on the ground, is the rear edge.
The rest of the foot is angled upwards towards the front of the bike, leaving a gap
between most of the foot and the ground. (up to about a half inch at the far forward edge of the foot).
Now, imagine pushing forward on the bike.
The rear edge of the stand foot is still slightly in front of the stand pivot point,
so the bike will have to "rise" very slightly, to allow the stand to swing to the rear.
However, remember that the bike may now be standing more upright and will therefore have less weight leaning into the stand,
and therefore may need very little incentive to rise up slightly.
But, if the Duck foot itself were entirely against the ground, without that "gap" towards the front, we have a different situation.
NOw, as the bike tries to roll forward, and the stand swings under it's pivot,
the "front edge" (toe) of the Duck Foot is already against the ground, and the rotation of the stand
tries to force the toe harder into the ground. As the rotation continues, the toe becomes the contact point with the ground,
and it tries to lift the bike a lot more, to give it room to swing past the pivot.
This makes it quite difficult to push the bike forward, off the Duck foot stand.
I JB-welded a wedge of aluminum to the bottom of my Duck foot stand,
to accomplish what I have just spoke of.
I did this because my wife has braces on both legs and has to be assisted
in mounting the Wing, while it is on the side stand.
Even though I always park the bike in gear, I wanted the best "roll off" resistance
I could get from that side stand.
It worked out very well.
Here's a picture of the Duck foot side stand with the "wedge" attached.
If yours is doing the job that's great, and you shouldn't need to do what I did.
If you have any concerns about "roll-off", this may be of help.
DC
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi DC,

Thank you for that. I shall check it out in the morning and see if mine has the "condition" you describe.

My wife also needs assistance to get aboard and we also use the side stand. I hold the left h/bar as well for stability. The reason I like it so much is because it appears to be more solid than the puny OEM stand.

Regards,

Trev.
 

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Dream Catcher, I have the same stand and I have noticed the gap you speak of. I wonder if also one could grind back some of that heel? I also wonder if one could get into the slot and machine it back slightly allow it to swing a few more degrees forward? Then it would require a few more inches of travel before the stand folds up. Thanks for the heads up on this set up.
 

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Honda_Guy said:
Dream Catcher, I have the same stand and I have noticed the gap you speak of. I wonder if also one could grind back some of that heel? I also wonder if one could get into the slot and machine it back slightly allow it to swing a few more degrees forward? Then it would require a few more inches of travel before the stand folds up. Thanks for the heads up on this set up.
I wonder why Big Bike don't mold the damm thing to hit the ground flush?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
For the number crunchers, I have put my bike on the main stand on level concrete with a board on top of the clutch and handbrake reservoirs. I then measured the angle with a spirit level and it was 0 degrees.

I then put it on the side stand and it is near enough to a 7.5 degree lean. Would anybody like to do the same with the OEM side stand and give us the numbers for comparison?

Had a quick ride on some very twisty roads this morning and did not get close to scraping the stand.
Preload on 15, Traxxion springs up front. Scuffed the tyres to the edges. I'm happy.

Trev.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
RedStreak said:
Honda_Guy said:
Dream Catcher, I have the same stand and I have noticed the gap you speak of. I wonder if also one could grind back some of that heel? I also wonder if one could get into the slot and machine it back slightly allow it to swing a few more degrees forward? Then it would require a few more inches of travel before the stand folds up. Thanks for the heads up on this set up.
I wonder why Big Bike don't mold the damm thing to hit the ground flush?
Maybe there is a method in their madness.

Could it be that the back edge is designed to "dig" in if the bike moves backwards. If it is flush on the ground it may act as a big "skid". Being a beautifully polished chrome base it would slide very easily.
Having said that, I always pull up in gear and use the side stand switch to "kill" the engine, then key off.

Trev.
 

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Dream Catcher said:
Hey Trev,
Here's something to think about and check the situation with your Duck foot side stand.
Back in 02, I installed the progressive stuff on my new wing. I also installed the Duck foot stand.
It did seem to lift the bike a little but I also noticed a disturbing condition.
This could get a little long but I want to share what I found and why it seemed very important to me.
As we all know, in addition to being designed to hold the bike up, it is designed to "keep the bike from rolling forward".
This is accomplished by the geometry of the mount and pivot of the stand.
When the stand is in it's full down position, it projects forward from it's mounting point.
With this condition, for the bike to roll forward, the weight of the bike has to be lifted some,
so the kickstand can rotate past the pivot point.
Since the bike usually will not "rise up" without some external added incentive,
it will tend NOT to roll forward off the side stand.
Now, if all that makes sense, here's an interesting part of the Duck foot stand geometry.
When the bike is resting on the stand, you will notice that the only part,
of the bottom of the foot, that is resting on the ground, is the rear edge.
The rest of the foot is angled upwards towards the front of the bike, leaving a gap
between most of the foot and the ground. (up to about a half inch at the far forward edge of the foot).
Now, imagine pushing forward on the bike.
The rear edge of the stand foot is still slightly in front of the stand pivot point,
so the bike will have to "rise" very slightly, to allow the stand to swing to the rear.
However, remember that the bike may now be standing more upright and will therefore have less weight leaning into the stand,
and therefore may need very little incentive to rise up slightly.
But, if the Duck foot itself were entirely against the ground, without that "gap" towards the front, we have a different situation.
NOw, as the bike tries to roll forward, and the stand swings under it's pivot,
the "front edge" (toe) of the Duck Foot is already against the ground, and the rotation of the stand
tries to force the toe harder into the ground. As the rotation continues, the toe becomes the contact point with the ground,
and it tries to lift the bike a lot more, to give it room to swing past the pivot.
This makes it quite difficult to push the bike forward, off the Duck foot stand.
I JB-welded a wedge of aluminum to the bottom of my Duck foot stand,
to accomplish what I have just spoke of.
I did this because my wife has braces on both legs and has to be assisted
in mounting the Wing, while it is on the side stand.
Even though I always park the bike in gear, I wanted the best "roll off" resistance
I could get from that side stand.
It worked out very well.
Here's a picture of the Duck foot side stand with the "wedge" attached.
If yours is doing the job that's great, and you shouldn't need to do what I did.
If you have any concerns about "roll-off", this may be of help.
DC


Exactly!!! When I bought my '03, it had one of those side stands on it, and my bike rolled off the stand in the driveway. Luckily, the guy I bought the bike from also gave me the stock side stand, and I reinstalled it. I also added the Rivco pad to the bottom of the stock stand. 8)
 
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