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Well I mounted the CT on the wing for the first time today. I didn't get to ride it more than about 10 minutes but with 36 lbs of pressure it didnt feel a lot different that my MT. I'm hoping to take it on a much longer ride this weekend. My main questions is, how many have riden to Alaska with a CT and what if any are the Pros and Cons of a CT for a trip like that. As in the different road conditions I'm going to encounter.
 

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Which CT did you put on? The runflats, Michelin Alpin and Yokohama Envigor are around 28-34 and the non run flats are up around 44 PSI. Too much pressure and you'll wear out the center before you get there so keep an eye on the tread wear. I don't think you'll have a problem in Alaska with a CT, more experienced posters will be along soon....
 

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better traction and shouldnt have to worry about a flat or buying a tire ( not wearing out)good luck n enjoy trip-
 

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Well I mounted the CT on the wing for the first time today. I didn't get to ride it more than about 10 minutes but with 36 lbs of pressure it didnt feel a lot different that my MT. I'm hoping to take it on a much longer ride this weekend. My main questions is, how many have riden to Alaska with a CT and what if any are the Pros and Cons of a CT for a trip like that. As in the different road conditions I'm going to encounter.
I most likely will mount up a Michelin Alpin for my alsaka trip next year . Reasons are siping gives ya great water distribution , good traction in all road conditions ( till it gets pushed really hard , which for that rode I will be sight seeing ) , 1/32 extra tread depth , and smooth ride at 30psi I will run it at . Again sight seeing only for Alaska trip I got planned .
 

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As a veteran of a couple of Alaska trips, the CT is the only tire. I would ever run on such a trip. Went on a '99 1500 with motorcycle tire many years ago and had a great trip, but ended up with a couple of cuts (sharp rocks in crushed material used to patch roads) in the tire that worried me the entire second half of the trip. The rocks they use for road construction (which you WILL experience)are really hard on tires. That trip ended up being almost 13k miles and used up the majority of the tread on the MC tire(on a 1500 the tread normally lasts much longer than the 1800)so when we went again on the 1800 we rode on the Goodyear Triple Tread, which at that time was a favorite. Our 205/60/16 was HUGE, but wore like iron. We went all the way to Alaska and back and never had another thought about the tire. This was a huge difference from the anxiety we experienced on the previous trip.

As to pros:
more tread, longer tread life, more stability on gravel/construction zones, wet traction far exceeds MC

cons:
likes to stay perpendicular to uneven concrete/ surfaces, especially at low speeds. Deeper tread will, throw rocks at your buddies new pampered motorcycle paint, causing loud protests. (Or so I have heard!)

recommendations:
use a RFCT as your ONLY option. There is no other tire for his trip. Also find a high mileage front tire as well. Tires wearing out should NOT be on your mind or robbing your attention.
Before you set out, go find gravel roads (the deeper/more treacherous the better) to ride and ride them until the pucker factor is gone. This is the most important skill you will need in Alaska. You will be riding along and suddenly discover the hard surface has just disappeared and you will be riding in several inches of loose rocks or gravel. It's called construction up there. Encountering these conditions is inevitable. A car tire with its wider stance is a stabilizing factor.

Enjoy one of the greatest trips of a lifetime!

:thumbup:
 

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recommendations:
There is no other tire for his trip. Also find a high mileage front tire as well. Tires wearing out should NOT be on your mind or robbing your attention.
Before you set out, go find gravel roads (the deeper/more treacherous the better) to ride and ride them until the pucker factor is gone.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

i use the Bridgestone BT 45 on the front of my bike and i have 10K miles on this one, looks good so far with little cupping..I got 26K from my last BT 45 front tire....*smile*
 

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I've never been to Alaska, but a car tire is the ONLY tire I use on the rear of a wing, period!! I would not even consider anything else for an Alaska trip. AKLDRIDER uses car tires-- and has posted that the car tire takes him places that he could not get to if he was using a standard mc rear tire. Take it from the guy that lives in Alaska as to what you should use......
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the info.. As stated it's my first CT and I would rather get any and all info I can from those that know.. To answer the other question I'm running a Michelin Alpin run flat
 

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Thanks for all the info.. As stated it's my first CT and I would rather get any and all info I can from those that know.. To answer the other question I'm running a Michelin Alpin run flat
The Alpin will serve you well. Good luck on the trip. WE NEED PICTURES!! I am officially jealous.
 

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Alaska

I went to Alaska in 2012. I had a MIchelin Alpin on the rear and a BT-45 on the front. Road that combo up the Haul road to the Artic Circle and back. The total trip was just under 10,000 miles. I thought the RF Alpin was a great choice for the roads we would be riding on. I was right , never had any type of a problem. Good luck with the trip of a life time. We had such a great trip in 2012 we are heading back to Alaska in 3 weeks. Leaving on the 6th of June. Be safe and enjoy the ride. Larry
 

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Alaska

I forgot to mention, WELCOME to the Darkside. Be safe and enjoythe ride. Larry
 

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Alaska

I went to Alaska in 2012. I had a MIchelin Alpin on the rear and a BT-45 on the front. Road that combo up the Haul road to the Artic Circle and back. The total trip was just under 10,000 miles. I thought the RF Alpin was a great choice for the roads we would be riding on. I was right , never had any type of a problem. Good luck with the trip of a life time. We had such a great trip in 2012 we are heading back to Alaska in 3 weeks. Leaving on the 6th of June. Be safe and enjoy the ride. Larry
Larry,

We'll be leaving on the 4th from a little north of Traverse City, so we'll have a 2-1/2 day head start on you. I expect that you'll catch us in less than a week (judging by your IBA certs). My partner has a real aversion to anything more than a 500 mile day, even in the Dakotas. Keep an eye out for a silver wing with a silver trailer and a black wing traveling together. Have a great trip.

Richard
 

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:congrats: and Welcome to the DARKSIDE....... :flg:
Don't forget to get your # an Decal....



 

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Alaska

Richard Clem, Our plans are to make 600 miles the first 3 days. We will cross the border east of Glacier the fourth morning. Our wives are going with us this year so 1,000 mile days are out. I will keep an eye out for you. Good luck. Be safe and enjoy the ride. Larry
 

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Alaska

I did the Alaska ride on a runflat CT and wouldnt do it any other way. Did 600 miles per day, or thereabouts, tent camped. when the gauge shows half tank filler up, or better yet, never pass up a gas station once in the Northern Territory. a great ride, have fun
Andy
 

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Us89

Richard Clem, Our plans are to make 600 miles the first 3 days. We will cross the border east of Glacier the fourth morning. Our wives are going with us this year so 1,000 mile days are out. I will keep an eye out for you. Good luck. Be safe and enjoy the ride. Larry
One of my favorite pieces of road. It has the honor of being the only road I've ridden that I didn't want to ride the speed limit (75 mph), let alone the normal 10 over. It's open range and it was being heavily used in 2010, when I was there. Watch out for the signs of the cattle on the road and cautious with the reservation racers. I do hope that you aren't staying in Browning the night before. Oh and at the Alberta crossing, no matter how long it takes for the customs guy to show up, don't park and get off the bikes. Just a word of warning.

Will you be stopping at the International Peace Garden?

Richard
 

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Well I mounted the CT on the wing for the first time today. I didn't get to ride it more than about 10 minutes but with 36 lbs of pressure it didnt feel a lot different that my MT. I'm hoping to take it on a much longer ride this weekend. My main questions is, how many have riden to Alaska with a CT and what if any are the Pros and Cons of a CT for a trip like that. As in the different road conditions I'm going to encounter.
First - In my "not-the-least-bit-humble" :lol: opinion the CT is the only way to go. With over 50 years of travel between home in Alaska and places all across the South 48, that experience has shown me that I want a tire that will hold up to whatever I encounter, and keep me as safe as possible while doing so.

Second - The "different road conditions" may not be quite as different as you anticipate. Certainly, you will come upon road maintenance and construction/re-construction. That will involve stretches of gravel, sometimes a bit of mud. The CT will offer some advantage over a mt in those conditions, but your own riding experience will have a much larger bearing on successful negotiation of such spots. Other than those areas, most of the highways will be very similar to what you ride around home. However, the pavement used in many places in the far north - especially those far from cities - tends to be of a type that wears tires out much faster than the smooth stuff used in warmer climates. The benefit of this is that traction in rain is still pretty good, and here the CT offers even more protection.

In the northern reaches of the Yukon, within the last 150 miles or so before reaching the Alaska border, there is a lot of broken pavement with potholes, loose gravel, frost heaves - just about every description of potential disaster. With those, it is your suspension that will receive the most abuse. To soften the blows, it is a good idea to lower your tire pressures - both front and rear - at least 10%, and up to 30% if you have a compressor so you can adjust it back up soon after arriving on smooth(er) pavement in Alaska.

Most people, on their first trip to Alaska, are surprised at how "civilized" things are up north. But... there are still long stretches of pristine wilderness and, depending on the time of day, miles you may travel without seeing another vehicle. For me, I ride all night long so as to enjoy the miles all alone - just me and the wild animals I get to observe. The daytime traffic, wherein I might see another vehicle every 5 or 10 minutes, is just too crowded! ;)
 

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In the northern reaches of the Yukon, within the last 150 miles or so before reaching the Alaska border, there is a lot of broken pavement with potholes, loose gravel, frost heaves - just about every description of potential disaster. With those, it is your suspension that will receive the most abuse. To soften the blows, it is a good idea to lower your tire pressures - both front and rear - at least 10%, and up to 30% if you have a compressor so you can adjust it back up soon after arriving on smooth(er) pavement in Alaska

That's some awesome advice and I personally never gave that a thought :thumbup:
 
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