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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
2006 GL1800

I went dark side last summer. Bridgestone Driveguard RF. Why did I do it? Simply for more load capacity. The Car Tire load rating is 209lbs more compared to a Dunlop E4 MT.

I am a really big guy, my wife is a tiny bit above average and we wanted to pull a camping trailer. We were definitely overloading the MT. I did not do it save money on a longer lasting tire, or because they are "safer". I read many of the praises of a CT on this forum.

I used the CT for the last year. Even rode many tight twisties (I live in Colorado) with the CT. I could, if I felt like it, drag the pegs. I picked up a spare rear wheel a couple months ago and just had an Elite 4 mounted. I took a 900+ mile ride into the mountains last weekend. FWIW over the last year (8,000 miles) I have experimented with pressures from 32-40psi.

Well, I am going back to a MT for 90% of my riding. I will keep the CT for trips with the trailer. Why you ask?

The CT never felt "planted" in corning. There was always this feeling of...well.. looseness. Cornering always required constant bar pressure to stay leaned over. Far from neutral handling. Handling was very compromised.
When stopping on a crowned roads the bike always wanted to lean in the direction of the crown requiring effort to keep it upright. Not fun with 500lbs of rider, passenger and a trailer behind.
Cracks and uneven surfaces such as crossing storm culverts, driveway aprons, rutted roads, and dirt roads made the back of the bike wag a ton. The tire edges caught on everything it seemed. The tail wagged the dog.
In low speed turns, without speed momentum to flatten the edge, the tire rode up on to the edge of the tread corner.
Pulling off the road onto a sloped or rutted shoulder was always an adventure in what it the bike going to do when I hit this. Occasionally I have to ride across my lawn and up and over my sidewalk at a 45 deg angle to get into the garage. I swear the bike just gets yanked left and right as I hit the sidewalk edge if I take it slowly. I am not a small weak guy and it took a lot of strength to keep the bike straight up.

I thought a bit more about riding the curves this weekend. MT, just light smooth bar pressure, flip the bike into the curve and ride through. CT, firm press of the bar to overcome initial reluctance to lean over, expect the lean over wiggle as momentum and weight flatten the edge, and then constant pressure to keep leaned over. So much more work.

So, back to a MT last weekend. Wow, my bike handles like it is on rails in the twisties. No drama having to go onto or off a shoulder. Smooth low speed u-turns. It was so much fun and so more relaxing to ride a tire designed to be leaned over. I did get caught in several hours of heavy rain and I would say the CT hydroplaned less then the E4. Cudos to the Driveguard. Boo to Dunlop who still have hydroplaning of the E3 in the new tire.

So, the MT handles better, riders better, is more relaxing, Riding was way more fun. The car tire does 2 things better. Carry more weight and last longer. Not worth the compromise in handling to me.

Flame away
 

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No flames here. I understand the low speed, rutty road, sloped driveway problems all too well. I have to fight them too, and have lost the battle a couple of times.

I do a lot of slab riding, and there is nothing better than a car tire, presently a Driveguard, for my purposes. I've put over 300,000 miles on car tires. I do have to be aware of the road surface in walking speed situations, but I can't see going back to a MT.

Glen
 

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I used a run flat CT on my 2013. At that time I was 2 up and riding more extended trips. I felt it worth the handling inconvenience for the safety of two up riding. You do have to manage the slow speed wonkyness.

Now my wife has her own ride and I’m on a 2018. I’ve decided its not worth the inconvenience on this bike. I’m back on a motorcycle tire and will just ride with the Bridgstones or E4s.

Cool experience though and now I can say I have done it.
 

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I used to run a CT on my wing when I worked for GoDaddy and was commuting every day on US 60 to Loop 101 to Scottsdale and then when I was commuting to Gilbert right off the US 60.. All high speed highway and I was burning thru MT's. now that I've retired I'm back to a MT and will most likely keep it that way for a bit. My last CT was a Michelin Primacy Alpin Snow Tire and it got a big air bubble on the sidewall. I'm thinking the heavy cornering might have separated the layers because I used to lay into the ramp at about 70 mph going from one highway to another. I hope someday they make a run flat MT cause I've done the butt pucker with a high speed rear tire blowout on an elevated ramp from I-10 onto US 60.. massive fishtailing..massive Pucker factor!
 

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This thread was helpful.

I was going to buy my first CT next week because of the run flat feature but this thread made me ask this question.....

Do I want to be prepared for the rule (good handling every ride) ?
..or the exception (possible flat - which has never happened to me on a street MC - knocking on wood)?

I do realize there are additional benefits to a CT, like cost and possibly stopping distance but handling trumps everything for me. YMMV.

Thanks for starting this thread.



Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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This thread was helpful.

I was going to buy my first CT next week because of the run flat feature but this thread made me ask this question.....

Do I want to be prepared for the rule (good handling every ride) ?
..or the exception (possible flat - which has never happened to me on a street MC - knocking on wood)?

I do realize there are additional benefits to a CT, like cost and possibly stopping distance but handling trumps everything for me. YMMV.

Thanks for starting this thread.



Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
Don't get me wrong.. once I got used to the handling of the CT it didn't bother me at all even in the twisties. I describe the handling as it wants to stand up and you have to push it over into a turn and then it will want to stand up again. The high speed blowout I had was from a flat piece of steel that basically cut the rear tire with a 3" gash and the Whoosh.. all the air was gone. My guess would be that normally you'll run over a nail or some other sharp object and you'll have a slow leak and you'll start to feel the rear end wobble and be sluggish. These are just my descriptions of my time with a CT. Having said all this.. If I was running superslab back and forth to work again, I would go back to a CT in a heart beat.

Matt
 

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IronMan
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NICE RITE UP ON YOUR TIME ON CT ! NOT FOR EVERYONE !!! I WONT GO BACK ! I RUN 26/27 LBS STAY SAFE . WE ALL GOT CHOICES ! NEXT TIME TRY A PIRELLI SUPPOSED TO BE REAL CLOSE TO MC TIRE YA JUST DONT GET THAT MANY MILES OUT OF IT
 

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Arkansas Ridgerunner
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Nice write up ... a very good explanation!! (y)

Something that is often overlooked. The CT is not for everyone. In the last ten years I've personally talked with about 5 who were in that category.

You found a use for the CT specific to your needs. (y)

Enjoy!!!
 
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Great write up. I really appreciate folks that put in the effort to do a real evaluation and then write it up. I almost always benefit from the posts.

I used to ride on a Yokohama RF tire and thought it was OK in the handling department. Now I'm riding on a Driveguard and a SnowControl and IMO they are both better than the Yoko. I do notice the more difficult handling on uneven roads, but not so much in a turn. I think it is harder to push the bike down into the turn, but once it is there, I don't feel like it takes much encouragement to stay in the turn. I do tend to lean a bit to the inside on the turn, which I realize does help somewhat.
 

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This thread was helpful.

I was going to buy my first CT next week because of the run flat feature but this thread made me ask this question.....

Do I want to be prepared for the rule (good handling every ride) ?
..or the exception (possible flat - which has never happened to me on a street MC - knocking on wood)?

I do realize there are additional benefits to a CT, like cost and possibly stopping distance but handling trumps everything for me. YMMV.

Thanks for starting this thread.



Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
When I installed my first car tire over 12 years I knew the handling would be different, but I sure wanted to try the safety and load handling capabilities of the Kumho. I headed straight to a parking lot for a little PLP. It took a while to get used to the feeling, but within the first half hour of riding I never thought about it. I just had to get used to it. It is only on a slow-speed rutted road that I even notice it any more.

I'll never go back to a round tire.

Glen
 

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For those who want to try before you buy, I've got a couple of different tires mounted on spare rims y'all are welcome to come and get. You can ride them till you make a decision and return them (as long as it's not a year-long test ride 😉).

I'm located in Crossville TN.
 

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Nice write up evaluation. Pretty much everything you say is true, but the degree is different for different folks. As to turns, I find once used to the feel, there is no problem or concern. I don't expect a heavy bike to ride like a 600# one, although I can scrape real often if I let my self go. As to the mileage, yes, it's true the Driveguard gets more--in my case now at 20,000 miles, I've still got 6/32" tread left, which means only changing it every other year.

But the Biggy is the run flat. Until you've highsided at 70 mph because of a blown rear OEM tire and screwed up your body, you might not think it too important. I do.
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Great comparison and write-up! Especially your wonkiness statement: Cracks and uneven surfaces such as crossing storm culverts, driveway aprons, rutted roads, and dirt roads made the back of the bike wag a ton. The tire edges caught on everything it seemed. The tail wagged the dog.

I have tried 3 different CT’s, and found the Driveguard to be the worst (super wonky at low speed over irregular pavement, and too much effort in the curves). I am now running a Pirelli P1 CT, and it is night and day different from the Driveguard. Handles curves much better, and almost NO wonkiness compared to Driveguard. Why so much different? Probably because the P1 has a much rounder profile than the Driveguard.

Does the P1 handle as good as a MT ? No. So why do I run a CT?
  1. Safety – from blowouts
  2. Convenience – can drive up to 50 miles on a runflat CT with zero pressure
I live in East Central Florida. Have had at least 5 rear tire flats in last 10 years of riding (lots of construction, nails etc. on the roadways). So runflat is important to me.

I am not trying to convince you or anyone else to use a CT instead of MT. BUT – if you decide to use one 10% of the time for extra load capacity, or 100% of the time for whatever reasons, IMHO the Driveguard is one of the worst choices you can make. It nearly dumped me and my bike numerous times (wonky, irregular pavement, slow speed). If you are going to use a CT – try a Pirelli P1 which in my experience (not opinion) is the most motorcycle like CT out there. And if you do a little research on this forum you will find others that agree.
 

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First of all, I am new to gold wings. We bought a 2006 to do long trips that will be 2up towing a trailer and need to get from point A to B quickly to spend as much time exploring where we are going. That means a lot of slab miles traveling to and from the destination.

My other ride is a Yamaha FJR 1300, which we ride 2 up and tow a Bushtec trailer. I have about 60,000 miles towing with this bike, including 3 trips to Alaska. UI have always run Michelin PR2 (now PR5 - since they discontinued the 2s) Best we can do is about 6500 miles and the rear is shot.

I decided to dark side the wing since we know we will be doing a lot of slab miles getting to the destination. At the recommendation of another FJR owner who has a wing, I put on a Pirelli W210 Snow Control 195/55R16 running 38 psi. In addition, I installed progressive fork cartridges, new seals and bushings, and installed a 1200 spring on the back and followed Traxxion's method of making sure the preload adjuster was properly filled and operating (I did replace the hose on mine because it was in poor condition). Preload was set a 25 for this trip.

I come form a road racing background and love to ride the twisties so going to a gold wing was a tough decision for me. I look for twisty back roads where the twistier the better. I rode many of my favorite roads for this ride which I have been over many times on the FJR towing a trailer.

With all of that said, here is my observations for our first multi-day trip on the wing. We used this as a shakedown to see if there was anything else we should address. The weather was hot, mid to upper 90's riding in Washington, Idaho, Oregon. Our route included all rural back roads, two up towing our trailer. I was pleasantly surprised at how well the bike tows, handles the twisties and how much torque is instantly available. The wing is a much better tow machine than the FJR. First, when breaking, the gold wing has the anti-dive feature which means no forward pitching of everything as the front end loads up under breaking. Second the brakes on the wing are massive, they are very good. I also don't get the push from brake to throttle transition when going into corner on twisty roads that I get with the FJR. The CT was very good, in fact my comment to my wife was I can't tell a CT was on the bike when we were riding through the twisties. I didn't experience any extra effort to lean the bike in or keep it leaned in. Traction was amazing, I could get very aggressive with the throttle driving out of corners.

I commented to my wife at the end of the first day, that I am more relaxed because the riding position is more upright, and the anti dive on the forks works really well allowing me to ride more relaxed. My hands and wrists didn't hurt, and I experienced no vibration at all or numbness. Two things that need to be addressed, the stock seat SUCKS bad. Russell Day Long will be done this winter. #2 we have to find a way to manage the heat. Need to bring more air in to help.

The CT was really good for my set up. It didn't hinder or cause me any issue while riding twisties aggressively. The gold wing was surprisingly agile through the twisties even for as heavy a machine as it is. We we encountered about 20 miles of gravel roads, and the wing handles those roads much better than the FJR (and the FJR is not bad with gravel). I don't know if it is due to the wheelbase, rake/trail of the wing or if the CT helped or combination of both. But the gravel was no issue at all (both hardpacked and loose gravel encountered)

Bottom line, for me, the CT stays.
 

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A 175 width car tire reduces the tendency of the bike to walk down the road crown or uneven pavement.

I respect your decision, but I’ll never go back to a MC tire.
 

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LOL I love the "almost no wonkiness" used as description of CT handling. It reminds me of "for a Harley it handles really good" or "jumbo shrimp".
 

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Thanks for the honest feedback. I am curious however as to what pressure you were running the tire? What you describe MAY (not saying it is) be attributed to a RF tire running too much pressure. (If you never dropped down beyond 32, and most was above that, your tire was harsh and misbehaved badly. Most like UncleJohn and I run the DGRF at under 28. I bump mine up to 32 on a very aggressive ride, but the fact you thought the ride was harsh, (My wife refuses to get on the bike if I have a MT on it, as she wants the ”soft-ride tire”) tells me the tire was probably overinflated...

Just another opinion, apologies if my supposition is inaccurate.
 
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Discussion Starter #20
Started running 32. The Fobo system went in to alarms when it hit 42 psi. 10psi gain hot to cold is a lot. I kept raising it up 2 psi cold at a time and still got large gains hot and I mean hot. 140-160f? Finally settled at 38 cold and mid 40s hot.
We had 500lbs of rider and passenger on the bike.

You guys who run 28 psi are you like 180lbs geared up and always ride solo?

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