GL1800Riders Forums banner

41 - 60 of 86 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
834 Posts
Went DS on my GW in 2012. To me the front tire helps to determine how much pressure is need on the bars to lean the bike with a CT. When I first went DS it still had I think it was a Dunlop. It did take extra ordinary effort to lean the bike over, but stuck to the road just fine. Maybe even inspired extra confidence. Went Double DS and bike leaned /counter-steered much easier. Closer to what a MT feels like. Today I have a Michelin Commander II on the front with a Bridgestone Drive Gaurd RF on the rear. Transitions for me comfortably. Do have to watch for dips in road especially (with any CT) at stop light rolling speed. It’s second nature to me now so no big deal. Just finished a 5500 mile trip in 9 days on Oct. 11th on this set up.

Now on my VFR1200X it seems to flick around town super easy for a 600 pound machine. Maybe it feels that way to me due to becoming adapted to the pressure for steering with a CT on the GW. Don’t know but love how both bikes handle.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
298 Posts
Discussion Starter #42
10/19. Thanks all of you for contributing. This information will be usefull to a wide variety of riders. New products come out all the time, and we might possibly see a CT handle like a MT in the future. As for right now I am still undecided and hopefully some more posts will make up my mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,450 Posts
Well.... Just to throw this into the mix! I wonder how this Mini handles!
Anyone can do anything! :rolleyes:


However I like the OP's question. We get just one sided information on sites like this. Hardline Pro and hardline Con.
Experiences and how tires are compared, are a way to decide what to try.


Me, I'm one of the worlds greatest sceptic's. However, sometimes I have found Snake Oil really works!


I have made my decision years ago for safety and drivability that matches my application and needs. I also have a 2nd rim
with the correct MC tire and switch back and fourth from time to time. However that MC tire seems to spend a lot of time
resting. But then again that's my choice.


Corventure Dave
That Mini must drag hard parts in the twisties >:)>:)
 

·
Arkansas Ridgerunner
Joined
·
3,427 Posts
My Journey

I've been doing this for over 10 years now and so far have accumulated 250,000 miles running the dark side. It has been a long time since I really gave any thought to all the reasons I made the switch. For me it wasn't about performance, tire wear(mileage), etc. It was almost totally about safety. At the time there were a lot of pictures circulating of MT from 1800's that had come apart, split, had blowouts, etc. Then I saw a couple of those tires up close and personal. And I've got to say, it scared the crap out of me. That was what finally pushed me into this direction. It was hard for me to enjoy the ride thinking about that tire on the back and what could happen to it. And I know there are guys with many, many miles and no issues, but still ....

So, I made the switch and came away with some benefits that I didn't have with MT. Increased traction was probably the biggest, then smoother ride was next, the increased load capacity was also a consideration. The tire designed for the bike in a lot cases was overloaded when we pulled out of the driveway, and I believe that had a lot to do with the failures. But all of this is second to the safety aspect of a RF tire on the bike. In most cases it is not hard to repair one on the side of the road if necessary.

I would have to agree that easy performance type handling is not as good with a CT. That is the primary reason I did a lot of research looking for lighter weight RF tires. While they don't transition as good as a MT they improve the handling considerably. In my situation it is pretty easy to try a lot of tires ... I go through about 4 a year. That has it's benefits when looking for the best tire in my situation.



I see posts from guys who try one tire and decide well that didn't work out at all. I've never found any two CT that handle the same. They are all slightly different, some good different some bad. And the bad for one person can be great for another. We are all different have different expectations. For example, one rider referred to doing a lot of research and settling on the Yokohoma. Well, I have to say ... that was the absolutely worst CT I ever tired. If you want to have fun in the twisties, that ain't the tire to use. But, that is my opinion ... someone else will love it. For you guys who only try one tire and go back, then your reasons for the switch in the first place are probably far different from what mine were.


Is the Darkside for everyone. Absolutely NOT!! If your only concern is performance and handling then staying with the MT is exactly what you should do! But when it comes to safety the CT is the KING!! :thumbup: Just my opinion!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
If your only concern is performance and handling then staying with the MT is exactly what you should do! But when it comes to safety the CT is the KING!! :thumbup: Just my opinion!!
This idea that safety is greater with the car tire, while admitting that performance and handling are not, presents an enigma.

About 12 years ago when I was an active SAE member and still advising a student formula car team, I had dinner one night with the fellow who was at that time in charge of motorcycle tire development for Bridgestone. As all know, Bridgestone makes both car and motorcycle tires.

I don’t remember how it came up, but we discovered at dinner that we both rode large bikes. The discussion turned to tires, his wheelhouse of expertise.

Sidewall design is a big deal in tire design. Motorcycle tires, car tires, truck tires, cargo trailer tires ... all see different loading issues in their life.

He was appalled at the trend among many heavy touring bike owners to mount car tires, which, as the car tire proponents point out, all behave differently when mounted on a bike. The side wall and road interface characteristics are not designed for motorcycle expected loadings. Why do you think that reputable tire dealers won’t install car tires on a trailer, let alone on a motorcycle.

No one’s mind will be changed by any posts here, least of all my posts. But the incredibly foolish idea that a car tire is safer on a motorcycle than a motorcycle tire has to be called out as B*ll Sh*t so that at least the uninformed are aware of the controversy.

Why there is controversy is a mystery to me ... but for many, the potential savings of a heavy tread automotive run flat is just too much to resist. Cheapness and tread life convenience seem to trump common sense for many.

To each his own ... but if you think you’re safer on a car tire that does not handle or perform as well as the manufacturer spec’d motorcycle tire, keep it to yourself. Don’t suck innocent people into following you. It’s like there was a crack forum where addicts could explain to each other that it was OK since they weren’t dead yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
This idea that safety is greater with the car tire, while admitting that performance and handling are not, presents an enigma.

About 12 years ago when I was an active SAE member and still advising a student formula car team, I had dinner one night with the fellow who was at that time in charge of motorcycle tire development for Bridgestone. As all know, Bridgestone makes both car and motorcycle tires.

I don’t remember how it came up, but we discovered at dinner that we both rode large bikes. The discussion turned to tires, his wheelhouse of expertise.

Sidewall design is a big deal in tire design. Motorcycle tires, car tires, truck tires, cargo trailer tires ... all see different loading issues in their life.

He was appalled at the trend among many heavy touring bike owners to mount car tires, which, as the car tire proponents point out, all behave differently when mounted on a bike. The side wall and road interface characteristics are not designed for motorcycle expected loadings. Why do you think that reputable tire dealers won’t install car tires on a trailer, let alone on a motorcycle.

No one’s mind will be changed by any posts here, least of all my posts. But the incredibly foolish idea that a car tire is safer on a motorcycle than a motorcycle tire has to be called out as B*ll Sh*t so that at least the uninformed are aware of the controversy.

Why there is controversy is a mystery to me ... but for many, the potential savings of a heavy tread automotive run flat is just too much to resist. Cheapness and tread life convenience seem to trump common sense for many.

To each his own ... but if you think you’re safer on a car tire that does not handle or perform as well as the manufacturer spec’d motorcycle tire, keep it to yourself. Don’t suck innocent people into following you. It’s like there was a crack forum where addicts could explain to each other that it was OK since they weren’t dead yet.
Lots of folks have strong opinions against a CT on a Goldwing, yet they have never tried it. They remind me of armchair quarterbacks. Soo have you ever tried a CT on your Goldwing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,592 Posts
This idea that safety is greater with the car tire, while admitting that performance and handling are not, presents an enigma.



About 12 years ago when I was an active SAE member and still advising a student formula car team, I had dinner one night with the fellow who was at that time in charge of motorcycle tire development for Bridgestone. As all know, Bridgestone makes both car and motorcycle tires.



I don’t remember how it came up, but we discovered at dinner that we both rode large bikes. The discussion turned to tires, his wheelhouse of expertise.



Sidewall design is a big deal in tire design. Motorcycle tires, car tires, truck tires, cargo trailer tires ... all see different loading issues in their life.



He was appalled at the trend among many heavy touring bike owners to mount car tires, which, as the car tire proponents point out, all behave differently when mounted on a bike. The side wall and road interface characteristics are not designed for motorcycle expected loadings. Why do you think that reputable tire dealers won’t install car tires on a trailer, let alone on a motorcycle.



No one’s mind will be changed by any posts here, least of all my posts. But the incredibly foolish idea that a car tire is safer on a motorcycle than a motorcycle tire has to be called out as B*ll Sh*t so that at least the uninformed are aware of the controversy.



Why there is controversy is a mystery to me ... but for many, the potential savings of a heavy tread automotive run flat is just too much to resist. Cheapness and tread life convenience seem to trump common sense for many.



To each his own ... but if you think you’re safer on a car tire that does not handle or perform as well as the manufacturer spec’d motorcycle tire, keep it to yourself. Don’t suck innocent people into following you. It’s like there was a crack forum where addicts could explain to each other that it was OK since they weren’t dead yet.
I don't have anything against those who choose to run a CT, but I am a little perplexed at the comments that dismiss decent handling as not a safety concern. Tire failures and punctures are in the very low single digits ( less than 3 %)as a cause for motorcycle accidents, going Darkside doesn't change that statistic very much, considering that 50% of the motorcycle still has a MT. and the fact that a CT can blow out too. Even a RF. I know that no one wants to be in that statistic, but what good does it do me to increase my odds of not having a blowout by maybe 1/10 of 1% but increasing my odds of losing control in a tight turn or long sweeper?

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
:grin2:
Lots of folks have strong opinions against a CT on a Goldwing, yet they have never tried it. They remind me of armchair quarterbacks. Soo have you ever tried a CT on your Goldwing?
They remind me of people who can tell the difference between dog droppings and fudge without trying both. Do you try every stupid thing that you see on YouTube? Hold my beer and watch this!

I can write the flame responses myself. I’ve seen them many times. Do you need to go out to the barn and make love to a cow, or can you tell that that’s not a good idea ... yeah, I know. Don’t knock it til you’ve tried it.

Tell yourself anything you want about the brilliance of running car tires... but don’t tell innocent bystanders that you’re doing it for the safety.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
I don't have anything against those who choose to run a CT,
I agree. I don’t care what choices they make for their own bike. But talking someone else into it based on safety crosses the line.

I would not try to talk a car tire guy out of his choice. It’s like trying to convert someone to another religion.

But I would want to talk a newcomer out of the idea.

It was once pointed out that “A man convinced against his will is of the same opinion still.”

This is that sort of issue.

Before you choose car tires, see if any reputable tire dealership will install one for you. If they won’t, it’s not because they think it’s a dumb idea ... it’s because their lawyers think it is a dumb idea.

And they’re right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Sounds like the Yahoo "your going to crash and burn from the past." Toro you are about 10 years late.
You can do many stupid things repeatedly without an immediate regret.

I know that mounting car tires is not instant death. That does not make it a good idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,722 Posts
Before you choose car tires, see if any reputable tire dealership will install one for you. If they won’t, it’s not because they think it’s a dumb idea ... it’s because their lawyers think it is a dumb idea.

And they’re right.

Yes they will and a couple times they will loan you the tools to take the wheel off, change the tire and tell you they have had a few of those Goldwing guys come in to have a Wink, Wink C/T put on a trailer wheel. Two times to have a inside tire repair patch put on, and once to replace a tire. I won't go back to Wal-Mart as they scratched the rim, and since 2008 I have never been turned down to have a car tire put on and have been asked how the bike handles and have I had a problems with it's use from managers on down. I did have a Harley shop refuse to install a BT-45 on the front wheel after they had put on three previous ones, but they also started charging $45.00 if you brought the tire in, so I would not have had them change it anyhow.

1. Sears for repair
2.Big O Tire for repair with a "we don't do this on a regular bases as he handed me a socket and breaker bar.

3. Discount Tire for a new tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
I agree. I don’t care what choices they make for their own bike. But talking someone else into it based on safety crosses the line.

I would not try to talk a car tire guy out of his choice. It’s like trying to convert someone to another religion.

But I would want to talk a newcomer out of the idea.

It was once pointed out that “A man convinced against his will is of the same opinion still.”

This is that sort of issue.

Before you choose car tires, see if any reputable tire dealership will install one for you. If they won’t, it’s not because they think it’s a dumb idea ... it’s because their lawyers think it is a dumb idea.

And they’re right.
Sounds like you have appointed yourself as an expert here. You were right when you said you're not likely to influence anyone here. You got all your info over dinner with someone who impressed you, who probably has never ridden on a CT either. I mentioned armchair quarterbacks, but most of them played ball somewhere at some point in time, so you don't qualify for the term. You are more like a marriage therapist who's never been married. LOL
 
41 - 60 of 86 Posts
Top