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My 2 cents worth regarding a CT causing an accident. Like most of you guys, before I would give it a try, I had to do some research. Looking for a real world accident that was the result of using a CT. Back then I did find an example of a Honda Dealership that was spreading the word. They had changed a CT off an 1800 Goldwing. It was coming apart because it was not designed to be run on a motorcycle, so it was exceedingly dangerous ... blah, blah, blah.

Digging into this story I found it was a guy that rode into Arkansas from Texas. He was two up and with a group. On the trip he kept making remarks to his companions about how his bike was not handling right. At a gas stop it was suggested that he should check his air pressure in his rear tire because it looked a little low. Well not wanting to hold up the group, he kept going. Somewhere in Central Arkansas the rear tire started coming apart and had to be replaced. (I think I got this story mostly correct)

This could come across as a failure of a CT, but actually it was the failure of the rider to keep an eye on his tires. As it turned out, he had ridden the bike from Texas to Arkansas without air in it. This story alone convinced me I needed to make the change. It also convinced me to always have a good TPMS working that will give me my actual tire pressure while riding. :thumbup:
I too have been searching to find a CT causing an accident, and the incident that Monk mentioned is the only one I've ever heard about. That account is pretty much exactly what I heard and read about.
 

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My 2 cents worth regarding a CT causing an accident. Like most of you guys, before I would give it a try, I had to do some research. Looking for a real world accident that was the result of using a CT. Back then I did find an example of a Honda Dealership that was spreading the word. They had changed a CT off an 1800 Goldwing. It was coming apart because it was not designed to be run on a motorcycle, so it was exceedingly dangerous ... blah, blah, blah.

Digging into this story I found it was a guy that rode into Arkansas from Texas. He was two up and with a group. On the trip he kept making remarks to his companions about how his bike was not handling right. At a gas stop it was suggested that he should check his air pressure in his rear tire because it looked a little low. Well not wanting to hold up the group, he kept going. Somewhere in Central Arkansas the rear tire started coming apart and had to be replaced. (I think I got this story mostly correct)

This could come across as a failure of a CT, but actually it was the failure of the rider to keep an eye on his tires. As it turned out, he had ridden the bike from Texas to Arkansas without air in it. This story alone convinced me I needed to make the change. It also convinced me to always have a good TPMS working that will give me my actual tire pressure while riding.
Improper maintenance of tires is the most common cause of tire failures, MT or CT. Not maintaining proper air pressure, not checking for damage or defects, and not replacing tires when worn are the biggest culprits. Road hazards can affect any tire regardless of conditions.

BTW: I've seen guys run tires till you can see the air inside of them (exaggeration) just to finish out the season. If it were to blow, it would not be because a MT is dangerous, it would be for the same reason you mentioned, improper maintenance.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 

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dark side tire

I put one on the rear of my Yamaha Stratoliner, hoping to get 20,000 miles out if it. The bike handled OK. One particularly hot day (105 degrees) I heard strange noises. I theorize that the heat expanded the air in the tire, and the sidewall(s) was/were rubbing on the frame.
I replace it immediately, went back to MC tires, and never looked back.
 

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I put one on the rear of my Yamaha Stratoliner, hoping to get 20,000 miles out if it. The bike handled OK. One particularly hot day (105 degrees) I heard strange noises. I theorize that the heat expanded the air in the tire, and the sidewall(s) was/were rubbing on the frame.
I replace it immediately, went back to MC tires, and never looked back.

Interesting theory, however not all C Tires are the same and especially the run-flat could not possibly expand the sidewall from road heat. Also the theory indicates "that" CT was too large-wide in the first place.
But your result is just fine. Your doing the right thing running the tire you are comfortable with.:capwin:


True story,
When I was poor and in school I put a set of Centennial Radials on my car, 1965 Chevrolet. They were on sale. seemed to handle just fine until I found myself in a rain storm. Those Centennials floated like I was driving on grease! I nearly went off the road at night in the middle of nowhere.This car by the way originally came with Bias ply tires.
So I did a very dangerous thing. I replaced the Centennials with a set of Michelin radials from Sears! The owners manual did not recommend them. But I took my life into my hands and over the years wore out 3 sets of those tires and in all weather conditions with great traction and tread life.
I guess back then...….. I was an original Dark Sider!!!:wink2:


Oh... and I never went back to Bias ply tires!>:)


Corventure Dave
 

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You're an aggressive rider, or take poor care of your tires. I'm guessing aggressive. Many come in my shop and will make comments about being more aggressive. They'll make comments "that they ride much faster then others they ride with," or will make the claim "they ride aggressively," or spirited. I've learned to only ask one question to understand their perspective of fast ... "how many miles do you get out of a set of tires ???"

Mr. Cain, the fastest 5th gens rider on the Gap gets 1,000 miles out of a set. To wear through tires that fast, you have to be insanely fast, and ride the twisty all the time. When his tires are worn out, the center tread looks nearly new.

The ones who walk in my shop saying they ride very aggressivly usually are in the 5,000-8,000 mile rage.
You're right about "aggressive" being subjective. How many miles one gets is an indicator for sure, however, I just look at the bottom of the foot pegs and/or the width of the chicken strips.
 

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You're right about "aggressive" being subjective. How many miles one gets is an indicator for sure, however, I just look at the bottom of the foot pegs and/or the width of the chicken strips.
You have foot pegs ??? Some have less than half of what's originally there. If they install new, they drag all the time until the ends wear off. The ends get so sharp they're then called stilettos :)

I'm happy to report that I have full pegs, with nubs on their underside, and get I 10-12,000 on my Stones depending on how often I tow.

Did I tell ya about a Honda dealer tech who'd stopped in. For the past few years he was hired onto a motocross race team where his team competed against the manufacture teams. In the 250cc class the goal was to get 2hrs out of a water cooled engine ... what ??? He said the compression ratios they run are 17.5-18/1. He said usually an engine will live only about 1.5 hours.
 
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