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What is "Darkside"?
 

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I’m running the dark side on the back, and so far I love it. Haven’t done the heavy curves as of yet, but great on everyday riding.


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That's awesome! I wonder what tire he's running. :grin2:
 

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Great video showing how much tire is on the ground.
Would be great to see the same video perspective with a cement radial, as someone used to call a MT.
 

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Cool and entertaining video. I couldn't stop watching.

But at the same time. It's a little disconcerting to me. I get the long distance advantage of the darkside. But for curvy stuff like this it just seems...well...hard to described...disconcerting.
 

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Cool and entertaining video. I couldn't stop watching.

But at the same time. It's a little disconcerting to me. I get the long distance advantage of the darkside. But for curvy stuff like this it just seems...well...hard to described...disconcerting.



About 10 years ago, I followed a couple of darksiders around in the Ozarks for a year trying to wrap my head around how and or why it worked. At every stop I would look at their tires, looking for what I call the wear line, where that portion of the tire is no longer on the pavement. Couldn't figure out for a long time how the tire took the curves like it did and not have the wear line up on the sidewall. The explanation is in this video. In the curves you will see the sidewall flex as the downward force of the bike in the curve is pushed down on the tire.

After that year I put one on my bike and have not had any need and or desire to switch back. And I spend an enormous amount of time riding the curves in the Ozarks! :thumbup:
 

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To me it does not appear to have a large tire sidewall contact area in curves compared to a MC tire. It would be interesting to see a comparison of a MC tire vs a CT on the same stretch of road. Don't see a problem with this on dry roads but I would question how effective this would be in the rain or on a wet road. To each his own but not for me. In my mind a MC tire would have a lot more rubber on the road in curves and when roads are wet that's critical.
 

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I would suggest that Blacktop make a trip to Arkansas and follow Monk for a day. All you questions and concerns about a car tire will be answered. It took me several years to swap over. I was stubborn and did not think it would work. Now we sit at lunch and Monk tells everyone the stories about me not changing over. I am sure they are not for everyone but I am sold.
 

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To me it does not appear to have a large tire sidewall contact area in curves compared to a MC tire. It would be interesting to see a comparison of a MC tire vs a CT on the same stretch of road. Don't see a problem with this on dry roads but I would question how effective this would be in the rain or on a wet road. To each his own but not for me. In my mind a MC tire would have a lot more rubber on the road in curves and when roads are wet that's critical.



Not trying to start any kind of disagreement or anything like that. But collecting information is how you discover the truth when it comes to the use of something different like a CT. The CT shines in the rain. I have experienced / watched many examples of this. One I recall ... riding on wet roads in hard curves running a very good pace. Went through a curve under pretty heavy throttle, but the guy behind me got sideways pretty quick. He was running a MT. I've seen it happen many, many times.


Something I've seen done, but have not seen photos in a long time. Poor water on concrete, run through it then do a u turn. Do this with both a type tires. The contact patch on the CT will be wider! At one time, many years ago, I had a photo of that experiment.
 

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My guess that is standard car tire not a run flat.
And I was thinking the opposite due to lower pressure. When Dad and I first switched to CTs, over a decade ago, first tire was a Dunlop WinterSport RF. His description of what was happening in a curve was exactly what this video demonstrates.
 

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About 10 years ago, I followed a couple of darksiders around in the Ozarks for a year trying to wrap my head around how and or why it worked. At every stop I would look at their tires, looking for what I call the wear line, where that portion of the tire is no longer on the pavement. Couldn't figure out for a long time how the tire took the curves like it did and not have the wear line up on the sidewall. The explanation is in this video. In the curves you will see the sidewall flex as the downward force of the bike in the curve is pushed down on the tire.

After that year I put one on my bike and have not had any need and or desire to switch back. And I spend an enormous amount of time riding the curves in the Ozarks! :thumbup:


Ha..sounds like a familiar story of about 4/5 years ago when I was chasing a couple of red bikes around before making my switch, though to make things more complicated on my small brain to wrap its self around, there bikes had snow tires on the rear. Once I was enlightened about the new characteristics with modern snow tires, it all came together and after 50k miles, I don’t intend to never go back.
Enjoy


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Read through the comments, it would appear I was wrong, oh the horror!
From the video author:
Mike Hunter
38-40 psi depending on your weight...I weigh 180 lbs. & I like 40....no floorboards...those are stock pegs with peg pucks on them....ride it like you stole it!!!!
 
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