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When a deer in crossing the road in front of me, and I don鈥檛 have time to stop, I will speed up and always pass behind it. They don鈥檛 have good traction to do a u-turn on a paved road.

As for speeding up it helps because, a collision only can occur when you and the deer are in the same place AND at the same time. More speed equals less time in the area.

When they come at you from your side, there are not many opportunities in such a short amount of time.

I was once following a 18 wheeler, and a deer came running towards the road. The deer tried to jump the trailer. He bounced off the trailer after hitting it about midway up. Surprisingly he got back up and continued to cross the road. It looked like a cartoon.

This is what has worked for me. YMMV


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When a deer in crossing the road in front of me, and I don鈥檛 have time to stop, I will speed up and always pass behind it. They don鈥檛 have good traction to do a u-turn on a paved road.

As for speeding up it helps because, a collision only can occur when you and the deer are in the same place AND at the same time. More speed equals less time in the area.

When they come at you from your side, there are not many opportunities in such a short amount of time.

I was once following a 18 wheeler, and a deer came running towards the road. The deer tried to jump the trailer. He bounced off the trailer after hitting it about midway up. Surprisingly he got back up and continued to cross the road. It looked like a cartoon.

This is what has worked for me. YMMV


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Though somewhat counter-intuitive, that strikes me as an intersting take and good advice. It's similar to my reaction when another vehicle is vectoring on a path that will intercept me: sometimes speeding up is the best way out. But I've had a lifetime to train for that. Training mutes the effects of panic by providing us with programmed alternatives. I don't know how I'd train for this in a deer-specific scenario because it doesn't happen enough, and without situation-specific training, my brain no longer works quickly enough (if it ever did), to rationally parse the various choices. I hope I never have to have that confirmed.
 
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Though somewhat counter-intuitive, that strikes me as an intersting take and, in some circumstances, good advice. It's similar to my reaction when another vehicle is vectoring on a path that will intercept me: sometimes speeding up is the best way out. But I've had a lifetime to train for that. Training mutes the effects of panic by providing us with pre-programmed alternatives; I don't know how I'd train for this in a deer-specific scenario because it doesn't happen enough, and without situation-specific training, my brain no longer works quickly enough (if it ever did), to rationally parse the various choices. I hope I never have to have that confirmed.
I have been riding 55 years in the northeast. Unfortunately too many deer encounters, but I have been lucky. I consider deer a very high threat. Never hit one yet on a bike.

In Iowa there are parts of the road where they have electric eyes and flashing lights to warn you there have been deer detected.

In some parts of the country there are 10 foot high fences on both sides of the interstate to keep deer off the road. This works, but when you first see these fences, and when these fences end, be especially vigilant as once the deer gets into this corridor they will go back and forth until they get hit.

In high deer areas and at dusk and dawn, I will often follow a 18 wheelers as I have found deer can see and hear them better than most vehicles on the road

YMMV


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I won't ride on 2 lane rural roads after 5 pm. If I get caught out after 5 I will try to take an interstate or other busy road. Nothing is foolproof, but I feel like this is a pretty good compromise.
 

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I've done the loud speakers thing more than once when night riding west of Cedar City Ut coming from Panaca NV at night. Sometimes I think deer and elk vacation there. Not much traffic on that ol 2 lane so I also honk my horn every few min.
They do!!
 

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I know it happens all over, but here in Texas we鈥檝e had 2 deer impact fatalities in the last week. One a BMW rider, who I assume was wearing gear based only on the BMW stereotype. The other was a Harley rider that I assume was not wearing gear based on the Harley stereotype.

Either way, both guys were on fairly large motorcycles, and both sadly died.
I am typically ATGATTed up but I wonder what the circumstances were for each of these poor guys. Would I have faired any better in a similar impact?

We have a lot of deer in Texas, and I scan the side of the road as much as in front of me when riding when they are likely to be moving. Anyone have experience or advice on avoiding a collision with a deer?
I use those small whistles at the front of the bike and cars, it is supposed to scare them away. not sure if it works, but in 30 years of riding in Australia, I never hit a kangaroo or anything else, maybe just luck but for the cost of $10 I use them.
 

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I use those small whistles at the front of the bike and cars, it is supposed to scare them away. not sure if it works, but in 30 years of riding in Australia, I never hit a kangaroo or anything else, maybe just luck but for the cost of $10 I use them.
As mentioned earlier, they do not work for deer (which can't hear frequencies out of human range like dogs can). Seldom are the whistles mounted in the airflow to even produce any unheard sound. Roos may have different hearing range than deer, I have no idea nor worry about that species.
 

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Just wondering if anyone that hit a deer had an airbag on his Goldwing and did it work to prevent injury from front end crash with animal in the road?
I was wondering that myself. I suspected that the airbag would not have deployed in my case because the forks appear fine. But I'm not sure what really triggers the airbag.
 

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Five years ago I hit a deer just west of Richmond, Virginia, on a two-lane road. Riding with a passenger, and had just set cruise to 60mph when a doe darted out from the left and all I remember was a blur of deer legs and the impact with the front wheel. Probably what saved us was that I didn't see the doe coming so I didn't try to avoid and swerve. I did react after the strike and even went on the should a bit; it was a miracle we didn't drop the bike but managed to stay upright and come to a stop. The front fender flew off in the impact, and there was cosmetic damage to the underside of the front fairing around the lights, but the bike still operated just fine; in fact, the mechanics later verified no structural damage, just plastic fairings. I almost gave up motorcycling but am glad I've stayed with it now. I did a lot of research and basically came to a few conclusions: first, those tiny "deer whistles" have no verified confirmation in any research study that they work; in fact, one study said deer hear sounds in the same range as we humans, so if you can't hear it, neither can they. Second, bright lights can dazzle deer and make them freeze, so be judicious using them. Third, deer are a hazard any time of the year, not just in rutting season or hunting season (although my deer strike occurred during both in late November). Fourth, don't drop your guard even if out in the country on a back road. Finally, if you see a deer (or three) hanging out nearby, lay on that magnificent Gold Wing HORN that sounds like a Mack Truck! This will likely be most effective, although one never knows which way a deer will dart for sure. I basically concluded they are as dumb as squirrels! Be safe everyone! OH, one last conclusion: The Gold Wing is a wonderful motorcycle, and its mass certainly helped in this collision; had I been on a lighter bike, I likely would've gone down.
 

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Five years ago I hit a deer just west of Richmond, Virginia, on a two-lane road. Riding with a passenger, and had just set cruise to 60mph when a doe darted out from the left and all I remember was a blur of deer legs and the impact with the front wheel. Probably what saved us was that I didn't see the doe coming so I didn't try to avoid and swerve. I did react after the strike and even went on the should a bit; it was a miracle we didn't drop the bike but managed to stay upright and come to a stop. The front fender flew off in the impact, and there was cosmetic damage to the underside of the front fairing around the lights, but the bike still operated just fine; in fact, the mechanics later verified no structural damage, just plastic fairings. I almost gave up motorcycling but am glad I've stayed with it now. I did a lot of research and basically came to a few conclusions: first, those tiny "deer whistles" have no verified confirmation in any research study that they work; in fact, one study said deer hear sounds in the same range as we humans, so if you can't hear it, neither can they. Second, bright lights can dazzle deer and make them freeze, so be judicious using them. Third, deer are a hazard any time of the year, not just in rutting season or hunting season (although my deer strike occurred during both in late November). Fourth, don't drop your guard even if out in the country on a back road. Finally, if you see a deer (or three) hanging out nearby, lay on that magnificent Gold Wing HORN that sounds like a Mack Truck! This will likely be most effective, although one never knows which way a deer will dart for sure. I basically concluded they are as dumb as squirrels! Be safe everyone! OH, one last conclusion: The Gold Wing is a wonderful motorcycle, and its mass certainly helped in this collision; had I been on a lighter bike, I likely would've gone down.
I agree. Your conclusions about deer hearing are correct and as I mentioned in an earlier post, MN DNR study gave the same results about deer hearing frequency and the State Patrol study had the same result as to the effectiveness of "whistles", they simply don't work.
Slower speeds give us more time to react and look over the roadside or possibly lessen the impact in a collision. Be on guard every instant.
Deer get very confused when out of their element. Try to get up close to them in their environment t and they turn into very wily critters, their sense of smell is incredible. Properly harvested and prepared they are delicious!
 

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Fresh off a two-day ride through n/w CO and Medicine Bow NF and Snowy Range WY. One of the 7 in our group was by himself about 30 minutes behind the other 6 in our group, who were riding in a close "formation" (sounds like we have to fly in "formation" to protect ourselves against "the enemy"!). He was riding about 20 mph above the speed limit, which was probably 45-50 mph in this area, I don't know exactly. He came around a corner, spotted the assailant, hit the brakes, reducing his speed to about 40-45 mph at the point of impact, who in a split second had jumped into his path. He went sliding and tumbling, and broke his collarbone and three ribs. He's a very highly skilled rider, who never makes mistakes, but I have no doubt the excess speed enabled this to happen. Even with all of his skill and experience, he couldn't manage the situation from the speed he was riding. Excess reaction time and braking distance from the speed = accident, vs. a close call.

I wear an Alpinestars airbag jacket and wonder if that would have prevented the injuries. I also wonder if traveling in a group like the 6 of us were reduces the likelihood of a deer jumping into the midst of us, vs. riding solo like he was. Anyone have experience with that? Anyway, it made me go back an re-visit how reaction time and stopping distance quadruple with doubling of speed, and to leave even more margin for error than I currently do.

His BMW XR1000 was totaled.
 

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Fresh off a two-day ride through n/w CO and Medicine Bow NF and Snowy Range WY. One of the 7 in our group was by himself about 30 minutes behind the other 6 in our group, who were riding in a close "formation" (sounds like we have to fly in "formation" to protect ourselves against "the enemy"!). He was riding about 20 mph above the speed limit, which was probably 45-50 mph in this area, I don't know exactly. He came around a corner, spotted the assailant, hit the brakes, reducing his speed to about 40-45 mph at the point of impact, who in a split second had jumped into his path. He went sliding and tumbling, and broke his collarbone and three ribs. He's a very highly skilled rider, who never makes mistakes, but I have no doubt the excess speed enabled this to happen. Even with all of his skill and experience, he couldn't manage the situation from the speed he was riding. Excess reaction time and braking distance from the speed = accident, vs. a close call.

I wear an Alpinestars airbag jacket and wonder if that would have prevented the injuries. I also wonder if traveling in a group like the 6 of us were reduces the likelihood of a deer jumping into the midst of us, vs. riding solo like he was. Anyone have experience with that? Anyway, it made me go back an re-visit how reaction time and stopping distance quadruple with doubling of speed, and to leave even more margin for error than I currently do.

His BMW XR1000 was totaled.
Ouch!! Condolences to him.
The roadside view there gives quite a bit of viewing distance before the woods begin. So many of my routes have thick woods right up to the road shoulder that greatly requires attention and (at least from me) lower speeds to scope out what may be ready to bound out w/o any warning.
I usually ride where traffic is virtually not much (if any) issue. Deer are my greatest danger concern.
 

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" Wonder if traveling in a group helps?" I doubt it has a major effect. Have seen several videos where the 3-4-5 th rider has been "attacked" by a deer. I think they just get confused and try to run from the threat. Or sometimes they are already in flight mode and the road and bike are just in their way. I have been lucky and not had a collision but sure had some "pucker" moments. I believe the late Tom Finch hit 9 of them in his career. :eek:
 

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" Wonder if traveling in a group helps?" I doubt it has a major effect. Have seen several videos where the 3-4-5 th rider has been "attacked" by a deer. I think they just get confused and try to run from the threat. Or sometimes they are already in flight mode and the road and bike are just in their way. I have been lucky and not had a collision but sure had some "pucker" moments. I believe the late Tom Finch hit 9 of them in his career. :eek:
I don't know how often it happens, but there have been domino accidents where a deer has brought down a group's first or second rider and others went down behind.

Deer have the most rudimentary of brains. Evolutionarily they are meals-on-the-hoof for mountain lions, little more than walking plants that make cows look like Einsteins. Running tnto them, though an unintended consequence, is a problem of our own making: Deer populations have soared as humans have culled deer's natural predators.

Because deer are basicaly four-legged twitchy-nerve stems, they can't, don't, and won't react predictably; as a result, the things we try to do as individuals--deer whistles, bright lights, blasting Metallica-- are self-soothing futility; all those things--especially the Metallica--are as likely to attract them as repel them.

We should face it squarely: As individuals, there is nothing to do. Only regular and systematic culls of deer populations will keep us safer. There will be an outcry about cruelty to Bambi--justified because deer are gentle and lovely creatures--but our current method of culling--individual riders and drivers hitting individual deer--is also cruel, and the human costs are both incalculable and tolerable.
 
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Deer have been crazy in this area lately, they'll run you over when they can.
REMEMBER to search behind the ones that you see, and make a right-of-way for the greater threats.
 
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