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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Forgive me if this subjec has been brought up before. Just found out I am diabetic and I'm kind of wondering how this could effect my riding in the future. Any one out there who is - and how are you coping, or adjusting?

thanks
 

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Type I or type II? Don't let either keep you from enjoying the sport. Dibetes can be managed and you can still lead a great life. Just take control and listen to your Doc. I've been dealing with it for over 20 years. I try not to let it get in the way, we still do long distance touring and are planning several more trips this next summer. Take Care George
 

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I'm a Type 2 diabetic and it hasn't affected me much. I just have to remember to take my meds and watch my diet (hah!). What has bothered me are dizzy spells that so far no one has been able to diagnose the source of the problem. They come on unexpectedly and last about four hours. So far, I haven't been on the bike when that happens. I think they may be diet related, but can't get any of the doctors to agree with me.

Anyway, back on subject. Biggest thing to help get my diabetes under control was to lose weight. When first diagnosed, I weighed 288 lbs. Now I'm down to a svelt 228, feel much better and my numbers are usually well in the range where they should be. Seems they keep dropping those numbers, though. When I was first diagnosed, the numbers were 115-125, then down to 110-120, then 100-110 and now they're 90-105. Seems like a doctors conspiracy to me.

Mesquite Bob
 

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If you just found out, that means you probably are a recent Type II, which is usually easy to treat and if you take care of youself, it should not be a problem. Proper diet and hydration would be important, as avoidance of injuries (wear proper protective gear).

You didn't say to what degree your diabetes has progressed, but if you don't take care, it will contrinue to do so.

My wife developed type I when she was ten years old and is now 48. She is quite brittle and is on the pump. So the effects of diabetes are taking a toll on her. I won't go into specifics, but it's not diatebes that kills. It's all the side effects. She's scared to death that I might develop it, since it runs in my family, so every once in a while she pokes me. So far, so good. I'm in the 95=105 glucose range.

So, depending on your age and condition, to answer your question, it probably will not effect your ability to ride. It's not the end of the world. Take care of yourself and learn all you can about the disease. Don't just rely on what your doctor tells you. If my wife would have done that, she'd probably be dead by now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, I'm type II. My fasting glucose was 298. I am on metformin right now, and it's playing havoc with my body. I've been on the drugs since this Tuesday, so this is all very new to me. It's affecting my vision, and I keep making trips to the bathroom - all very fun - not. I have yet to get the dietician speech and the speech on how to test my glucose all by my lonesome. I appreciate your comments - I was worried when and if I DO get this under control there is risk of being HYPO-glycemic, thereby running into risk of dizziness, passing out. Not good on a motorcycle!
 

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indicolts said:
Forgive me if this subjec has been brought up before. Just found out I am diabetic and I'm kind of wondering how this could effect my riding in the future. Any one out there who is - and how are you coping, or adjusting?

thanks
I think severity is the main factor. Even in worst case, if your sugar is regulated there should be no issues. In your case, give yourself a little time to adjust to your medication so there are no surprises.

FWIW, I am type 2. I take a pill in the morning and forget it. Early on, the pill could lower my sugar excessively if I didn't eat soon. This was an easy one to solve.
 

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Diabites

Metformin will not cause your blood sugar to go too low. It does not make your pancreas produce insulin (sp). It helps to keep your blood sugar from spiking. Weight and diet control produce the best results. I have gone from 245 down to 190 and with diet the blood sugar has gone from the high 300s to a 100/110 range. It just takes a mindset to do what you have to do. With good control you will live a normal life. Not to be morbid but control it or find a good surgon. They usually start with your feet.
 

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I've had Type I Diabetes for 40 years now, and have been riding for 4 years. Keep your diabetes under control, and you can do just about anything you want. If I feel a little "funny", I will do a quick glucose test to find out for sure. I also keep some snacks with me.
 

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I'm type 2 , I have had it about 3yrs' take your meds. and do not forget to eat some thing every couple hours just a little snack will keep you in good shape My forgetter works great I still want to go untill i'm bouncing off the wall but my wife keeps track of my snack times when we are riding
 

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I have been a Type I diabetic for 50 years. I live in northern Pennsylvania and, except for ice on the road, will ride my motorcycle every day for work. I always carry a tester and snacks with me to help me stay in control. Get a good doctor and take care of yourself and you can kep riding.

God bless,

Mark
 

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Indicolts,

Like Robby said, metformin (by itself) will not cause hypoglycemia. It causes the liver to produce less sugar. Usually a person is begun on a low dose and then titrated up (if necessary) until the desired blood glucose levels are achieved. This also lessens the incidence of GI upset (taking the medication with food will also help with this).
Another person had mentioned that their blood glucose level was running about 90-110. This would be an excellent range for a person with diabetes but would suggest that they were pre-diabetic if not diagnosed with diabetes.
I do telephonic health education with diabetics (and other chronic disease states) as part of my job. Wish all of you the best with controlling the diabetes. Controlling the diabetes instead of having it control you is the goal.

Ed W.
 

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diabetes

Well congratulations and welcome to an exclusive club! There are approximately 1 million Type 1 diabetics and 17.5 Type 2 diabetes in the US.

By the generous donations of millions of dollars and intensive R&D diabetics now can look forward to a long life with the disease. Although there is no cure as of now there have been some major movements towards that goal.

Right now there is a pump like device that will test your glucose level every 5 seconds---only those 18 yrs or older can get it. It is not widely available yet.

Now to your situation: Please please please don't become complacent when your blood glucose levels and other side effects of diabetes become 'normal'. Please test yourself regularly---before & after meals and before bedtime. Many diabetics stop regularly testing because they "feel fine". This is a misnomer and can cause long term complications.

You may want to check your glucose level before riding, then 1 hour after you start riding particularly if the weather is too hot or cold and also if you have any symptoms of illness.

Just for additonal information a person with diabetes can't possess a CDL license.

You have a lot of good life in front of you just don't become complacent about the disease. Ask your doctor about alternative testing sites (the finger tips are the usual spot but you can test elsewhere if you are aware of the differences)

Please contact your local ADA office or the JDRF. The ADA is more geared to both types of diabetes and education whereas the JDRF is more geared to the cure. (Generally speaking --- don't flame me.)

The urination you are experiencing is a 'sign' of diabetes. Your body is riding itself of the excess ketones in your system. There are test strips to let you know the amount of ketones in your urine. The Bayer brand is call ketostix and available at wal-mart. You may also get larger ketones when an illness is starting and sometimes if your blood sugar gets too high. It is something to be concerned about if it is high too long but can be rectified by lowering your blood sugar level and by drinking more water and urinating!!!---FUN

Over the next several days you may want to 'google' diabetes and learn all you can to empower yourself and take control of it. Remeber--You can control your diabetes -- kind of like driving a car --- you are the captain but don't pay attention and it can kill---not meaning to scare you or hurt you but to let you know you can live.

My daughter has been diabetic since she was 10 months old and is now 11.5 years old.

The reading of your blood glucose level is important to help you keep your blood sugar levels in the 'normal persons' level. That is somewhere in the range of 90-105. It is not an arbitrary number to say the least. But keeping your blood sugar in this range will help you on your HBA1C level. This is a test given every 3 months to test your glucose levels. Here is a link to quickly explain it: http://www.diabetestoolbox.com/HbA1c.asp

Don't know if your weight is control but this can be a big boon to assisting you in controlling the disease. Also, eating healthly...

If you are stressed with your new diagnosis that is okay--we understand--my daughter went from 6 shots a day at 10 months old to using the pump. You can do it!

DON'T RELY ON HOW YOU FEEL TO DETERMINE YOUR BLOOD SUGAR LEVELS. YOUR BODY WILL BECOME ACCUSTOMED TO THE ABNORMALLY HIGH OR LOW READING AND THIS COULD BE DANGEROUS.

If you have any questions or need some additonal help let me know. No question is stupid--especially right now!
 

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Welcome to the club!

Type II here. I went through the "How to be Diabetic" class and found it very helpful. I highly recommend it.

It doesn't affect my riding. Actually it doesn't affect me at all. I don't pig out on M&Ms anymore but that's about it.
 

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Bob, my boss had dizzy spells. He went to a hearing specialist. He was told that he had rocks in his head. :lol: sounds kinda funny, but he said there was some little rock like crystals in the inner ear that hang on to some little hair like thingies. If you get a bump on the head they can come loose. He went to this guy for treatment and they hung him not quite up side down for a few visits and now he does not have dizzy spells. Helped him. Thats just what he told me. Good luck and ride safe.
Joe
 

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:shock: Indicolts.....I am diabetic 2 and it really hasn't effected my ability to ride. generally mine runs in the higher rather than lower readings,mine were 300 +- then when my Doctor put me on metformin or forosimide,I am now with the weight down a bit and taking the meds as prescribed I run generally 110-130 and this seems to be the best area for my weight and structure...although as far as riding type two should not affect one from riding.Just know that if you start getting dizzy,ie: indicates that your count will be in the lower range and can be taken care of just by eating somthing to bring the count back into range...This only takes me about twenty min to change the count in the better range.
Mind you I am not an expert in this and was quite shocked to find out that I was diabetic in the first place....for I never prior to knowing ever experienced any simtoms of the diabetic state,one way or the other.

Also seems that even now I don't feel any of the symtoms of it still.never got dizzy,never broke into swets,and never had blurred vision so I never thought anything of it untill my blood checks came back from the labs and told me a different story??

So now I just follow the Docs rules and take the daily meds as perscribed and feel pritty normal...(That is if I know what normal should be.)

Anyway that isn't whats keeping me from riding,,,I just had back surgery to combat some spinal stenoses...and will soon have a stint inserted into a vessle in my heart, and possibly have a defibulator/pacemaker inserted in my chest somewhere soon.,,

I expect about a 8 week recovery from that before I can even think about riding again. So my Yellow 1800 sits in the garage safe and sound until the day I can fire it up again.

Good luck with what you find and hope you are back riding soon....
 

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My Account:

In a nutshell I "used" to be diabetic. (type II) Yes, I said used to be. I underwent a gastric bypass and the diabetes was in essence eradicated or "wiped out" by the weight loss. Today, I have no evidence of abnormal blood sugar levels whatsoever.

During the time I was diabetic, I got as many different answers as there are possibilities regarding what to do and what not to do. I talked to nutritionalists, dieticians, and physicians. All said different things with regard to food intake, caffeine, etc.

There were a few general guidelines which are important to stress. Healthy, natural foods are best. Vegetables and fruits are important, but with fruits you actually need to be somewhat careful. Grapes, for example are miniature versions of bags of Domino Sugar. Treat them with a watchful eye towards moderation. Caffeine is always something to be wary of. Alcohol is also something to be wary of. Good sleep patterns, and excercise are critical.

With diabetes your blood sugar levels will fluctuate as they do in all human beings. They will spike after eating and will level out after excercising. Sitting for prolonged periods of time will need to be broken up by periods of activity. Not only does activity help blood levels to stabilize, but it is also beneficial for circulation. (Critical to someone with diabetes)

The same guidelines which would make riding safer, (i.e. periods for meals, rest, stretching legs, mental alertness, etc.) will coincidently make your newly diagnosed diabetes easier to manage.

One last comment about your eyes. Diabetes and the effects of it, does affect your vision. The blood vessels within the eyes suffer from the same poor circulation and as a result you may see changes in your vision. Many a person who's managed to approach diabetic conditions without the proper level of care and diligence has lost their sight due to eye complications.

Bottom line: Monitor your health and learn how to be in tune with what your body is telling you. By doing that hopefully you'll "outlive" your diabetes.

God bless you. I hope this in some small way, helps you.

Metric4me
 

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Another person had mentioned that their blood glucose level was running about 90-110. This would be an excellent range for a person with diabetes but would suggest that they were pre-diabetic if not diagnosed with diabetes.
Ed,

I overstated the Glucose a bit. I'm more like +/- 5 points, but I did have an A1C recently and was diagnosed as 'possible' pre-type-1. Of course my wife got all freaked out about it and she checks my glucose levels occasionaly, but they are always in an acceptable range. I once clocked in at around 110, but that was not the norm for me. I'm 6'2" and 240 lbs, so I could spare some weight for sure. I try to walk for exercise when I can. Keeps the BP down also. I need to stay on top of this, since I do have a CDL, and the job provides insurance to take care of my family's needs, especially my wife.
 

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diabetes

Refraining from all future incindiary posts, I'd like to offer my humilty and .02 cents.

My son has been Type I for 15 years. He's 20 now, doesn't ride yet but could. I agree if you keep it controlled there is no limit to what you can do. He is an eagle scout.

You guys with Type I for 30-50 years are quite the legends. The famous Joslin clinic in Massachusetts used to issue medals for that longevity. To be admired for sure.

The history of diabetes treatment is facinating. Under today's laboratory research standards, the insulin discovery by (names escape me) the 2 researchers and the dog would never have been found.

God bless modern treatment. And ketones are indeed something to watch.
 

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indicolts said:
Well, I'm type II. My fasting glucose was 298. I am on metformin right now, and it's playing havoc with my body. I've been on the drugs since this Tuesday, so this is all very new to me. It's affecting my vision, and I keep making trips to the bathroom - all very fun - not. I have yet to get the dietician speech and the speech on how to test my glucose all by my lonesome. I appreciate your comments - I was worried when and if I DO get this under control there is risk of being HYPO-glycemic, thereby running into risk of dizziness, passing out. Not good on a motorcycle!
Sir you have a PM
 

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I'm type 2 have been for quite some time now. when first diagnosed my blood sugar # was 515. I take metformin 2 times a day and I also take avandia 4 miligrams once a day. Like all the above you can control it, but let me tell you, the hardest part is losing the weight and keeping it off. I lost 60# but gained it back. Losing weight is the tuffest thing for me. My blood sugar #'s are always good between 90 & 110 A1C is 6.4 or less.
The weight is killing me. Good luck chin up. You'll manage , it all takes time. Don't get discouraged. Hang in there and enjoy your bike.

My best for you and everyone else in the club. (it sucks) :roll:
 
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