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I evidentally don't know how to find squat on this site. I know it's easy, I just have problems cause I'm ignorant.
I want to disable the antidive. There are a thousand ways and writeups on this site and I can't find any.
CAn anyone give me a few links to disabling antidive?
Thanks guys and sorry. I can learn, I guess I just never explored it.
Ray
 

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I evidentally don't know how to find squat on this site. I know it's easy, I just have problems cause I'm ignorant.
I want to disable the antidive. There are a thousand ways and writeups on this site and I can't find any.
CAn anyone give me a few links to disabling antidive?
Thanks guys and sorry. I can learn, I guess I just never explored it.
Ray
Good thread Ray. :thumbup:
I am wanting to disable my antidive also. Still got the air filter to be replaced.:eek:
Thanks Rocky and Scratch.
 

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My disabling only cost a nickle.

Sent via Tapatalk
 

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While we are at it, apologies for asking, but can someone just tell me in simple terms why I might want to disable the anti-dive feature.

I have found that the front of my bike seems to hit what seem to be relatively minor road imperfections with a pretty hard bang and it has been this way since new.

Is this what disabling the anti-dive might improve for me? If so, I woill certainly look into it more.

As there any significant down side to disabling it? Assumedly it is there to meet a perceived need?!

Brian
 

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The antidive (AD) is disabled by some of us because it tends to stick and give a harsh ride on even fairly smooth roads. It also prevents dive when the rear brake is appled and when the front secondary master is activated; that was Honda's intent, but it is not desirable when braking as going into a sharp curve at speed or trail braking in a curve unless you just think plowing into the mountain side or over the edge is fun. But, I do not think it is good to nix the AD unless you beef-up the fork springs first.

prs
 
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Defendantly disable the AD - you will only notice a more consistent ride without the odd harsh ride your probably getting now. There are no negative side effect at all so please don't worry about that.
 

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Defendantly disable the AD - you will only notice a more consistent ride without the odd harsh ride your probably getting now. There are no negative side effect at all so please don't worry about that.
Appreciate the comments from yourself and others - do you still have teh stock springs?

In any event, the Mrs & I are off this coming weekend on a short 7 day tour of some Civil War sites around Richmond Va., so I don't think I'll mess with anything at least until we come back home, - it would be just my luck to screw something up!

Brian.

PS - do I need a US nickel or will a Canadian one work?! They' re pretty much at par now.
 
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Yes it doesn't matter what you have for springs as they are all about the same. No need to alter the suspension in any way other than the AD fix.

You can spend as little as a nickel or $3000 but the end results will be about the same.
 

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Quoted for editing my responses TO ROADKILL:

While we are at it, apologies for asking, but can someone just tell me in simple terms why I might want to disable the anti-dive feature. You probably wouldn't want to if you're still running with stock front springs in the fork legs that are too soft to begin with. The anti-dive hydraulically locks the left fork leg via the linked braking to to prevent, well, front end dive.

I have found that the front of my bike seems to hit what seem to be relatively minor road imperfections with a pretty hard bang and it has been this way since new. Stock frt springs are soft and barely support the weight of the cycle when new. What you're hearing and feeling is most likely the fork legs bottoming out. They will bottom even easier when you get some age and miles on the springs. Mine did!

Is this what disabling the anti-dive might improve for me? If so, I woill certainly look into it more. The only advange I can see you might gain if you're still running with the stock front springs is somewhat less harshness when braking to a stop on a bumpy surface. Provided it's not so rough that the fork legs are also bottoming. Also the bike won't brake "flat" any longer, you will have at least some front end dive, maybe more than you'd like or feel comfortable with.

As there any significant down side to disabling it? Assumedly it is there to meet a perceived need?! Some (if not many) Winger's will disable the anti-dive when they upgrade the front fork springs or install a kit. With a good set of aftermarket springs and or a kit the anti-dive just isn't necessary at that point and many realize better handling and cornering because the anti-dive isn't locking up the fork when braking any longer. I've disabled mine after rebuilding the fork legs and upgrading to Progressive Suspension springs. The springs themselves prevent excessive front end dive when braking and I like the improved ride and cornering control on the brakes with the anti-dive disabled. Also my 03 handled somewhat squirrelly out on the slab at around 70 mph and higher until I rebuilt the fork legs and installed the Progressive springs. It's reported the springs give back an inch of travel, which I think helped correct a steering geometry issue I had resulting from my sagged and worn out springs.

However, there are many reports of sticking anti-dive actuators and/or sticking plungers in the left lower fork leg. You will find this topic within this forum if you search through the posts. Also, some riders have shimmed the anti-dive actuator to delay the anti-dive from coming on during lighter braking to avoid early lock up and retain some suspension travel until hard braking is applied. Before anything else, I'd recommend your making sure that your anti-dive isn't sticking first before you consider disabling or modifying it. Especially again if you still have the stock front springs in your fork legs. A stuck or lazy anti-dive will result in a harsh ride from the front end because it would be affecting the suspension travel.
 

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Yes it doesn't matter what you have for springs as they are all about the same. No need to alter the suspension in any way other than the AD fix.

You can spend as little as a nickel or $3000 but the end results will be about the same.
well that did not work for me . even with race tech 1.0 rate springs , it would bottom out bad on downhill rides :eek:4:. how would it be on stock springs . it worked well with 1.2 springs :thumbup:
 
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generally speaking anti-dive valves are a good thing however on the 1800 the problem is the valve will stick shut (all 1800's) so the forks are essentially locked and no action is allowed. On many of the older motorcycles dive was a problem with braking however the 1800 had no problem with that and the anti dive is really not required to start with.
So if you disable the unit you will experience the great ride this machine was designed to deliver with no front end dive nor handling difficulties.

Now as far as springs - this has nothing to do with springs, if your grossly over weight than springs may be required but disabling the AD has nothing to do with that.
 

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Quoted for editing my responses TO ROADKILL:

While we are at it, apologies for asking, but can someone just tell me in simple terms why I might want to disable the anti-dive feature. You probably wouldn't want to if you're still running with stock front springs in the fork legs that are too soft to begin with. The anti-dive hydraulically locks the left fork leg via the linked braking to to prevent, well, front end dive.

I have found that the front of my bike seems to hit what seem to be relatively minor road imperfections with a pretty hard bang and it has been this way since new. Stock frt springs are soft and barely support the weight of the cycle when new. What you're hearing and feeling is most likely the fork legs bottoming out. They will bottom even easier when you get some age and miles on the springs. Mine did!

Is this what disabling the anti-dive might improve for me? If so, I woill certainly look into it more. The only advange I can see you might gain if you're still running with the stock front springs is somewhat less harshness when braking to a stop on a bumpy surface. Provided it's not so rough that the fork legs are also bottoming. Also the bike won't brake "flat" any longer, you will have at least some front end dive, maybe more than you'd like or feel comfortable with.

As there any significant down side to disabling it? Assumedly it is there to meet a perceived need?! Some (if not many) Winger's will disable the anti-dive when they upgrade the front fork springs or install a kit. With a good set of aftermarket springs and or a kit the anti-dive just isn't necessary at that point and many realize better handling and cornering because the anti-dive isn't locking up the fork when braking any longer. I've disabled mine after rebuilding the fork legs and upgrading to Progressive Suspension springs. The springs themselves prevent excessive front end dive when braking and I like the improved ride and cornering control on the brakes with the anti-dive disabled. Also my 03 handled somewhat squirrelly out on the slab at around 70 mph and higher until I rebuilt the fork legs and installed the Progressive springs. It's reported the springs give back an inch of travel, which I think helped correct a steering geometry issue I had resulting from my sagged and worn out springs.

However, there are many reports of sticking anti-dive actuators and/or sticking plungers in the left lower fork leg. You will find this topic within this forum if you search through the posts. Also, some riders have shimmed the anti-dive actuator to delay the anti-dive from coming on during lighter braking to avoid early lock up and retain some suspension travel until hard braking is applied. Before you do anything, I'd recommend your making sure that your anti-dive isn't sticking first before you consider disabling it. Especially again if you still have the stock front springs in your fork legs.
:agree::agree::agree::agree::agree:
 

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generally speaking anti-dive valves are a good thing however on the 1800 the problem is the valve will stick shut (all 1800's) so the forks are essentially locked and no action is allowed. On many of the older motorcycles dive was a problem with braking however the 1800 had no problem with that and the anti dive is really not required to start with.
So if you disable the unit you will experience the great ride this machine was designed to deliver with no front end dive nor handling difficulties.

Now as far as springs - this has nothing to do with springs, if your grossly over weight than springs may be required but disabling the AD has nothing to do with that.
well for any one doing this without a spring change , do this put a zip tie on you fork by the seal , go for a ride , measure how far it gets pushed up . then you know if it bottoms out . i think travel is just over 5 in . so if you go out do a light stop , and you get the zip tie up 5 in , your in trouble :eek:4:, as what would it do on harder braking . or do the zip tie and just sit on it and see what travel is used just sitting on it :22yikes:
 

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generally speaking anti-dive valves are a good thing however on the 1800 the problem is the valve will stick shut (all 1800's) so the forks are essentially locked and no action is allowed. On many of the older motorcycles dive was a problem with braking however the 1800 had no problem with that and the anti dive is really not required to start with.
So if you disable the unit you will experience the great ride this machine was designed to deliver with no front end dive nor handling difficulties.

Now as far as springs - this has nothing to do with springs, if your grossly over weight than springs may be required but disabling the AD has nothing to do with that.
Storm I have no idea what kind of drugs your taking,but you shouldn't take them anymore!!

I've never heard more dribble about the ADV.and saying springs don't matter is pure BS.:eek:4:
 

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well for any one doing this without a spring change , do this put a zip tie on you fork by the seal , go for a ride , measure how far it gets pushed up . then you know if it bottoms out . i think travel is just over 5 in . so if you go out do a light stop , and you get the zip tie up 5 in , your in trouble :eek:4:, as what would it do on harder braking . or do the zip tie and just sit on it and see what travel is used just sitting on it :22yikes:
:agree:
That's a good idea and a very simple test to measure what travel may or may not be present in Roadkill's front suspension. I think he will be surprised to find how little travel is actually there with the stock springs.

And oh by the way, I also installed a Superbrace when I went through my forks just to tie them together. I did have to "shim" it .001" with a strip of aluminum tape to get a good snug fit to the tubes but not so much as to pinch and bind the upper bushings. My thinking is being that Honda only puts a damper in the right leg, the brace helps even the travel of both of the legs as well as eliminating or at least limiting fork flex.
 

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Storm I have no idea what kind of drugs your taking,but you shouldn't take them anymore!!

I've never heard more dribble about the ADV.and saying springs don't matter is pure BS.:eek:4:
Yup I think storm is missing the mechanical theory and relationship between the anti-dive, the fork springs and the overall engineering of the fork assembly. Rocky you'd probably know better than me from what I understand of your background and present work experience, but I thought I read opined here or somewhere else that Honda purposely undersprung the fork for a wider demographic of buyers? And that they designed in the anti-dive for the softer springs to enhance control and prevent bottoming under hard braking?

Pardon me as I'm probably looking into this too deeply so I'll stop but there sure seem to be alot of 1800 owners out there that have verbalized their dislike or concerns about the fork and suspension. And certainly there's a good number of vendors out there with products designed to address it.
 
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