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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I picked up a 2002 GL1800 with only 9,000 miles on it last year. One thing was immediately apparent. The steering and suspension sucked. I take that back. Sucked doesn't even come close to describing how bad it was. After much Googling and watching many videos, I decided that Traxxion Dynamics would be my savior. My initial plan was to drop the bike off at their Woodstock GA facility in March while I was down that way motorcycling with some buddies. Then Covid hit and that plan got cancelled. Fast forward to a few weeks ago and I started tearing it apart myself and ordering parts to do my own Traxxion Mega Monty.

I'll chronicle the transformation in this thread.

The forks came out first and were UPS'd to Traxxion.







Then the parts started showing up.



To get warmed up for the fun stuff, I started off by installing a set of Sentinel LED Fog Lights with DRL and Turn Signal functions. This bike did not have factory fog lights so I had to cut the blanks out of the lower cowl and mount up the lights. The fogs simply plugged into the existing plugs that were taped up to the harness near the lights. I had to run wires up to each mirror to get the DRL and Turn Signals working. The kit comes with a switch that mounts right into the panel where the factory switch would have been. It seems to be a quality kit and I'm happy with the added visibility that these lights provide.





To be continued...
 

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Sometimes that's the best way to get things done. Jump in and DIY. If you have any questions, you can ask 'em here and someone will give you an answer. Maybe not always the smartest answer, but the wealth of knowledge on this board is amazing. Keep us updated!!
 
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Once I got the notice that my forks were on their way back home from Traxxion it was time to start the triple clamp swap. I did my best to photo document the routing of the cables and lines prior to disassembly. I was able to complete this job without removing the top shelter (although it would have probably been easier if I had). I made my own steering stem nut socket using a piece of 1-1/2" pipe. I don't have many pictures of swap but it went something like this.

I unbolted the brake lines that hang from the lower clamp and unbolted the turn signal cancellation parts that run up through the stem. Next I unbolted both handlebars and laid them out of he way. Removing the hex nut o the stem allows you to remove the upper clamp. The lock nut and locking washer come off next. Then the lower stem nut. The lower clamp (with the stem) then drops out. The new billet clamps form Traxxion come with the All Balls tapered roller steering stem bearings. They press the lower bearing in for you at Traxxion. I knocked the old races out of the frame using a round bar. There is a little relief cut in the seat that gives you access to the races. The new tapered races get installed next. This was easily accomplished using a Harbor Freight Bearing and Race Driver set. Then I greased up the bearings and races and put it back together in reverse order. I torqued the nut to 30 ft. lbs. per All Balls recommendation. Then I worked the clamps from side to side and checked to make sure the nut was still torqued to 30 ft. lbs. On goes the lock washer then the locking nut. I think I turned the locking nut 90 degrees past snug and then bent the locking tabs on the washer up into the nut. Top clamp goes on next along with the hex nut. At this point I stuck the forks up into the clamps to align the top clamp with bottom clamp and then torqued the hex nut down. It is a shame, but the beautifully machined billet clamps then get all covered up.

Some down and dirty pics to help me remember routing:







The tool:





The new clamps in their new home:





To be continued...
 

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Wow! Great Job. Wish i had the skills. Sometimes I feel like buying a beater wing just to try and do repairs etc. I'm to scared to try it on my main bike:D
 

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Discussion Starter #6
After getting the triple clamp install wrapped up I reinstalled the forks and torqued them down. Before reinstalling the front wheel I put a new set of All Balls wheel bearings in it. I didn't have a proper puller to get the old double stacked wheel bearings out but found a trick here on GL1800 Riders. I basically stuck two long punches into the bearing I wanted to remove. From the opposite side, I inserted a long chisel between the punches. Tapping the chisel wedged it between the punches. This action created enough friction to allow the bearings to be driven out. I heated the hub slightly with a propane torch to expand it ever so lightly. It worked like a charm and soon I was tapping the new bearings in place. I also mounted and balanced a new Bridgestone Exedra. I have a modified Harbor Freight tire machine and Marc Parnes balancer. I've probably mounted and balanced over 100 tires with this set up.



I didn't take any pics of the tire work but here are some file photos of the machine and balancer. That's a No Mar bar.







Here's the Goldwing with the forks and front wheel reinstalled.You'll also notice that I started fitting the Traxxion Fork Brace and Guards at this point.





And here's the front end all back together with the Fork Brace installed.



Up next, I tear into the rear shock swap.
 

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Great job and thanks for all the pics, very interested in the rear shock swap. That is my only question when I do mine. I can handle the forks but want to know what is involved in doing the rear shock.
 

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Was there something wrong with the original 9,000 mile front wheel bearings ?
 

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Then you will want the Helibars, like I did when I did mine. You will be amazed at the new bike you end up with.
 

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Just curious, when you disassembled, was the the steering stem nut loose? Mine was finger tight and I was told this is a common discovery.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It was pretty loose. A few taps with a hammer and screwdriver was all it took to loosen it. It might have been finger tight but I didn't check it prior to going after it with the hammer and screwdriver.

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Discussion Starter #14
With the front all done, I turned my attention to the rear shock. Off come the seat and top shelter. Out came the battery and tray. Off came the right saddlebag. You have to remove the lower portion of the trunk (topcase) to get the saddlebag off. You also have to unplug the wiring harness and disconnect the latch release cable. Off came the rear wheel. Next I disconnected the fuel lines and electrical connections to the tank.Out came the full gas tank. Don't be a dumbass like me. Drain the tank before wrestling it out of its resting place. Lookie there! The rear shock in all its filthy glory. Next I unplugged and unbolted the electric preload adjuster unit from the right side of the frame. I supported the shock linkage with a little scissors jack, removed the lower and upper shock bolts, and lifted the shock and preload (still connected to the shock via the oil line) adjuster out of that Hell-hole.

The tank before extraction.



The preload adjuster in position before removing it.





Make sure you note the clocking of the preload slave on the shock so you can put it back in the correct position on the new shock.

Here some pics I took to remind me how it needs to look when reassembled.





The old shock and adjuster unit.



The Honda shock and the new Taxxion shock. Look at the size of that spring! They set it up for my big ass (They don't call me Ape for nothing). Also take note of the black marker filling in the clip groove near the bottom of the Traxxion shock. Traxxion will mark which groove the want you to reinstall the clip in once you remount the cleaned and bled slave to the shock.



Another pic to ensure I clocked the slave correctly once putting it on the new shock.



Traxxion spring compressor tool. Don't skimp here. Just buy one for $45.



I knocked off for the night at this point.

Here is how it looked at this point.





Up next: Getting the shock and preload unit ready for re-installation.
 

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You're probably right. It's only money. Right?
And when you are out on the road, that cost is irrelevant. In your pic’s it looks like the old line for the preloader is still on after bleeding it? Traxxion sells the stainless steel line for it. Put it on mine, because it IS only money.;)
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited by Moderator)
On to the new shock and preload assembly tear down and bleed.

I grabbed a Traxxion spring compressor when I bought my Mega Monty parts. It makes child's play out of removing the preload slave.



Here's the slave cylinder on the bench. Take note of the clocking of the line before you remove it.





From here I just followed Traxxion's written instructions and youtube video to blow the slave apart, reset the master, and bleed the system.



In process.



The finished product complete with new Traxxion steel braided line ready to go back on the bike.



From here is was just a matter a meticulously reinstalling the shock, adjuster, bag, lower trunk piece, battery tray and battery. It is a god idea to test run the preload adjuster before reinstalling the gas tank. It worked fine so I drained the gas tank and wiggled the tank back into position. This took some time until I figured out a good angle that allowed the tank to drop back in. Take your time and be careful not to damage the big harness plugs that the front mounts on the tank have to clear.

Suspension Done!

Up next, the "More".
 

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Discussion Starter #20
With the suspension work done I turned my attention to some other maintenance. The top shelter is off so I might as well change the air filter. It seems daunting at first but by slowly and methodically unplugging the ECM and cruise module and a few other plugs you can dig the airbox cover out of its hiding place. Don't try to disconnect the cable on the cruise control actuator. It will move out of the way with that cable connected.The air ducts on either side of the air box pop right out once you remove a single screw on each one. I also removed the air channels on both sides of the steering stem t make more room. Take pics and notes so you can remember the routing of cables and how everything plugs back in. Once you have finally uncovered the airbox simply back out the screws that secure the lid to the box. These don't have to come all the way out. Just back them out until the threads disengage. Lift the lid off to access the filter. I expected to find a mouse nest in the air box and I was not disappointed. I suspect this nest was in there when I bought the bike last year. The airbox was packed.I cleaned it all up, installed the new filter, and buttoned everything back up in reverse order.

A view of top of the airbox before moving the components out of the way.



Nice.





New filter installed.



Here it is after the top shelter was put back on.



Coming up: More Maintenance
 
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