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I just got my bike back from a major engine rebuild. You might remember my story about a hole that was poked in my crankcase from road debris. No accident happened, I was able to pull over normally.

The repair was very good and the bike is operating optimally.

My question is "Is my bike worth substantially less in resale because of the replaced engine?" There is no way to hide the rebuilt engine from the buyer, because I have to keep a document that states the new Engine VIN number.

Opinions please...
 

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I never bought a bike with a rebuilt engine, BUT a low time/rebuilt engine in an airplane makes it worth top dollar (along with other stuff). The buyer is getting a "newer" motor and should recognize that value. IMHO :D
Now if it just was Illusion Blue instead of yellow...... :wink:
 

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In my opinion, generally yes - with explanation.

There are motorcycles, Harley Davidson for example, in which a buyer would almost expect to find an engine that has been rebuilt due to engine failure or modifications geared toward increasing torque/horsepower in order to achieve an acceptable level of performance.

I don't believe the GoldWing falls into that catagory.

Also, aside from performance modifications, an engine rebuild generally carries the assumption of abuse or neglect causing engine failure. The assumption then follows, even though the engine has been rebuilt, what other components are within an inch of failure.

So generally speaking, I would answer yes.

In your case though, since you have documentation as to why the engine was rebuilt - that you suffered catastrophic damage to the block - you shouldn't see any substantial decrease in resale value. It's certainly good bargaining fodder for a buyer so you may have to wiggle a little bit more than with a stock bike, but not much. You should be fine.

Steve
 

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I had to rebuild the engine (motors are electric :p ) in my GL1200 at about 70,000 miles (long explaination, but not my fault). At 120,000 I sold it for $3500, just last March. I think having the receipts for the engine overhaul helped me get that. IMHO.
 

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I think if you sold now, the rebuilt would be a disadvantage, but down the line with years/miles on it, it would be an asset. Just MHO :D
 

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After you stack some miles on it it will be ok. New like that i would avoid it too. An explanation is needed.
 

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<There are motorcycles, Harley Davidson for example, in which a buyer would almost expect to find an engine that has been rebuilt due to engine failure or modifications geared toward increasing torque/horsepower in order to achieve an acceptable level of performance.

I don't believe the GoldWing falls into that catagory.<

A rose by any color is still a rose. A slam, even carefully worded, is still a slam. "rebuilt due to engine failure" is not a common term in my world, Harley, Honda, you-name-it. And "Acceptable level of performane" is a completely personal criteria. (A Little Bit is good, More is better, and Too Much is just right!)

Last time I was over at my Honda shop, the Service Department was still in operation Full Bore. And they weren't just putting on lights & chrome.

I think any engine mods, optional or required, calls for an explaination to the man with the money, e.g. buyer.

... my 2 cents.
 

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Jim King said:
A rose by any color is still a rose. A slam, even carefully worded, is still a slam.
And a fact, regardless how distasteful to one who would disregard it, is still a fact.

Furthermore, if a man has an enormous nose (i) is it a 'slam' to tell him his nose is enormous, and, (ii) would you assume telling him so would take him by surprise??

Clearly the man may find the fact distasteful and not want to acknowledge it, but that doesn't invalidate the fact.

Lastly, should you find my comment to be rude, remember that my comment was not made in a Harley room - I didn't tell the man that his nose was enormous - it was made in a GoldWing room - I made a comment about the man's nose to a group of people to which it is no secret; a group of people who already know about him.

Jim - That Harley is known for rebuilt or modified engines is as clear as the nose on your face.

"rebuilt due to engine failure" is not a common term in my world, Harley, Honda, you-name-it. And "Acceptable level of performane" is a completely personal criteria. (A Little Bit is good, More is better, and Too Much is just right!)
Not knowing your world I can't comment on what is common there, but I can only assume by your reply that in your world twin-cam cam bearings aren't disintegrating at frightening rates, and this is just the most recent problem. I'll bet Harley owners in the know are frantically trying to book passage. And, I didn't think it necessary to list every conceivable reason for the rebuilding of an engine. What I will point to is the staggering number of used Harley advertisements listing an engine rebuild or engine modifications. Disregard them if you wish - I can only lead the horse to water.

As to what constitutes an acceptable level of performance, I believe there's sufficient evidence to suggest that those who buy Harley Davidsons find that they, stock, do not provide an acceptable level of performance, hence the piles of money spent on performance modifications and obnoxiously loud exhaust pipes. This seems to me to be a clear-cut and irrefutable case of actions speaking louder than words, although this is not a point I was making.

Last time I was over at my Honda shop, the Service Department was still in operation Full Bore. And they weren't just putting on lights & chrome.
The point being? For a large metropolitan area, Los Angeles for example, go back one year and compile data showing the percentage of used Honda motorcycle advertisements listing a rebuilt engine. Then do the same with Harley motorcycle advertisements. Care to continue?

I think any engine mods, optional or required, calls for an explaination to the man with the money, e.g. buyer.
Agreed.

Steve
 

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Aughtsix said:
Jim King said:
A rose by any color is still a rose. A slam, even carefully worded, is still a slam.
>The point being? For a large metropolitan area, Los Angeles for example, go back one year and compile data showing the percentage of used Honda motorcycle advertisements listing a rebuilt engine. Then do the same with Harley motorcycle advertisements. Care to continue? <
[snip]
[Agreed.

Steve
Sorry Steve - no, I don't agree. I don't agree that loads of
Harleys are modified because they're broke. I modified mine
the day I bought it because I could, and I wanted something
different. Same with my Wing - started changing it 10 miles
after I bought it. And am still changing it. I'll be changing it
when I sell it. That'll be the case with every bike and
automobile that I've ever owned or will own. Hopefully,
that doesn't make them inferior.

What you won't find though, is me on a Harley board
quoting "facts" about Honda recalls, etc. If you want to
know what the “facts” are, get on the TC88 board - they’ve
got all the recalls, all the numbers, etc. info there from H-D.
No hearsay, no survey, no newspaper listing numbers.

What you will find is hundreds - make that thousands, of
guys that aren’t afraid of ripping a brand new motor apart to
try this or try that. I’ve hung out at the shops enough to see
guys make a mod, dyno it, and take it apart to move the
power curve up or down 500 rpm. They’re not doing that
because they don’t have adequate horsepower. They do it
because they love their machine, and they love working on
them. Harley’s are like ‘55 Chevy’s - you CAN beef them
up if you want. Or you can run them stock. Your choice.

I love my Wing. I'll modify it. Why? Because I can if I want
to. It's paid for and it's there for my enjoyment, be it hang
lights on it, make it faster, or make it loud.

Sorry to hack you off - but I can’t (won't) stand back and accept
misinformation.. I don’t have a big nose :). But if you know
of anyone letting a set of Alley Kats go cheap - let me know.

... and that's all I'm going to say about that. {Forrest Gump}
 

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Aughtsix said:
Jim King said:
A rose by any color is still a rose. A slam, even carefully worded, is still a slam.
>The point being? For a large metropolitan area, Los Angeles for example, go back one year and compile data showing the percentage of used Honda motorcycle advertisements listing a rebuilt engine. Then do the same with Harley motorcycle advertisements. Care to continue? <
[snip]
[Agreed.

Steve
Sorry Steve - no, I don't agree. I don't agree that loads of
Harleys are modified because they're broke. I modified mine
the day I bought it because I could, and I wanted something
different. Same with my Wing - started changing it 10 miles
after I bought it. And am still changing it. I'll be changing it
when I sell it. That'll be the case with every bike and
automobile that I've ever owned or will own. Hopefully,
that doesn't make them inferior.

What you won't find though, is me on a Harley board
quoting "facts" about Honda recalls, etc. If you want to
know what the “facts” are, get on the TC88 board - they’ve
got all the recalls, all the numbers, etc. info there from H-D.
No hearsay, no survey, no newspaper listing numbers.

What you will find is hundreds - make that thousands, of
guys that aren’t afraid of ripping a brand new motor apart to
try this or try that. I’ve hung out at the shops enough to see
guys make a mod, dyno it, and take it apart to move the
power curve up or down 500 rpm. They’re not doing that
because they don’t have adequate horsepower. They do it
because they love their machine, and they love working on
them. Harley’s are like ‘55 Chevy’s - you CAN beef them
up if you want. Or you can run them stock. Your choice.

I love my Wing. I'll modify it. Why? Because I can if I want
to. It's paid for and it's there for my enjoyment, be it hang
lights on it, make it faster, or make it loud.

Sorry to hack you off - but I can’t (won't) stand back and accept
misinformation.. I don’t have a big nose :). But if you know
of anyone letting a set of Alley Kats go cheap - let me know.

... and that's all I'm going to say about that. {Forrest Gump}
 

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When I was a kid, I remember going with my folks to see a magician. This guy did his act - all cheap tricks and such - but there was this whispy smoke constantly rising from the floor. Then at the end of the show this big cloud of smoke poofed up and, when it cleared, he was gone.

When your act isn't very good, a little smoke helps. When you just want to disappear, a lot of smoke is better.

Jim, without respect to this hijack, the subject of the thread is, specifically, whether or not Chipmunky's having had his engine rebuilt with a replacement block would diminish the resale value of his bike and secondarily, would having a rebuilt engine diminish the resale value of a GoldWing generally. My comment, irrespective your defensiveness toward it and apparent rejection of it, is valid as one would not expect to see a GoldWing with a rebuilt engine. My challenge to you to compile and compare data regarding the percentage of rebuilt engines in advertisements for Hondas and Harleys is equally valid as this would provide objective rather than subjective data. Your emotionalism certainly isn't unexpected, but it's not a useful basis for argument.

What you won't find though, is me on a Harley board
quoting "facts" about Honda recalls, etc.
Offered as an example - Jim, here you're just simply lashing out. I didn't write one word about Harley recalls.

...but I can’t (won't) stand back and accept misinformation...[clip]...If you want to know what the “facts” are, get on the TC88 board - they’ve got all the recalls, all the numbers, etc. info there from H-D.
Jim, do you notice any internal inconsistency in the above quote? If not you may well be the only one. And, while trying to maintain any level of credibility, how can you include the information from one website as evidence in support of your position while rejecting information from another? You certainly can't cite owner bias as a cause without negating your own argument.

No hearsay, no survey, no newspaper listing numbers.
No concrete, objective data, just subjective fluff and heresay. Interesting.

Steve
 
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