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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm planning to tow my new bagger 500 miles each way on an upcoming trip. Reading the forum indicates not using a cover because it would likely cause damage due to flapping in the wind.

The posts also recommended the trailer have a "stone guard" protecting the front and sides. My trailer is open with 2-feet rails.

Question: Do you recommend using plywood or some other material to box in the bike? If so, should the front be a wedge or square configuration?

I plan to repack/replace wheel bearings, upgrade lights, and paint the trailer.

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Mud flaps on tow vehicle, a bit of plywood up to the rail height in front, nothing else required. Side rails are a waste, items come from front, not at 90* from the side (usually 🙄). Recommend placing in neutral so you don't have load on driveshaft components.
 
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Stone guard or mud flaps. It looks like the trailer has some kind of stone guard in front in the 3rd photo.… probably all you need. I would put a piece of plywood across the front and call it a day.

I love the patina and rust on the trailer. Good looking paint on a work trailer is for sissies. I would never waist my time or money on paint on a utility trailer… at least here in the desert. Service the wheel bearings and tires.
 

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I probably don't need to say this but make sure you check the tongue weight. It's hard to tell from the pictures, but the bike looks to be just barely on the trailer (rear wheel just inches from the end of the trailer). Since the pics don't show the whole thing from the side, it's really hard to tell where the trailer axel is in relation to the load.
 

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Pro tip

Get yourself a cheapish laser temp gun. Monitor the temperature of the hubs by the wheel bearing at rest and gas stops. The temps will get hot if your wheel bearings are failing.
Anything can happen, and usually does. Do your best to minimize the chances.
I always just (cautiously) palm the hub. If it's warm(er) than you are used to it's a sign something is going bad with a hub, bearing or brake (if equipped).
Make sure you have appropriate tongue weight. 10% minimum or you can develope some nasty trailer sway at highway speed.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Stone guard or mud flaps. It looks like the trailer has some kind of stone guard in front in the 3rd photo.… probably all you need. I would put a piece of plywood across the front and call it a day.

I love the patina and rust on the trailer. Good looking paint on a work trailer is for sissies. I would never waist my time or money on paint on a utility trailer… at least here in the desert. Service the wheel bearings and tires.
The trailer has a toolbox on the front.
 

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Meh, stone guard would be nice obviously, the truck will absorb most any debris. Side guards, how much road rash do you have on the side of your car? I suppose a rock can shoot sideways from passerby. An enclosed trailer would be ideal for many reasons, what you have will be fine. Ya might have a little bug splat.
 

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The more "stuff" you add to the trailer, the more likely it is to work loose, break or become detached and damage the bike and / or nearby motorists. If you are really that concerned about damage while trailering, get a proper enclosed trailer.
 

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I also would recommend some kind of stone guard in the front of the trailer. I have an enclosed trailer that I purchased in 2003. It has a stone guard up about two feet and the guard is somewhat pitted after about 60,000 miles. If your are hauling your bike in the north country during the winter months it's possible that it will get covered with road salt. I wouldn't tow my bike under those conditions except in an enclosed trailer.
 

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I'm planning to tow my new bagger 500 miles each way on an upcoming trip. Reading the forum indicates not using a cover because it would likely cause damage due to flapping in the wind.

The posts also recommended the trailer have a "stone guard" protecting the front and sides. My trailer is open with 2-feet rails.

Question: Do you recommend using plywood or some other material to box in the bike? If so, should the front be a wedge or square configuration?

I plan to repack/replace wheel bearings, upgrade lights, and paint the trailer.

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I went to look at a Yamaha Venture a few years ago that had been trailered from Ontario Canada behind a motorhome to Florida and back. The bike had a cover on it as it was January in Ontario. Everywhere the cover had been touching the bike and flapping in the wind the paint was damaged so much so that the bike needed a full paint job, therefore I did not buy the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Plan to put a "stone guard" in front of my trailer. The top of the rails is 24". The first pole from the left is 30" (6" above rail). The second pole is 42" (18" above rail). The tape line marks 48" (24" above rail).

The width is 63". The thought is to purchase a sheet of treated plywood and affix it across the front only. The question is how high to make the wall: 24", 30", 42", 48", or some other height?

I appreciate any help you can provide.

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No real need to go any higher than the frame you have on the trailer now. You are just making a larger sail to give you wind resistance and lower gas milage. Other than bugs, any road debris will be hitting low on the trailer. No need for side panels.

I have used my snowmobile trailer to haul my bikes when I have moved. At least 7,000 miles and no damage to the bikes with the lower shield. When I used it for snowmobiles in the winter, the slush was always on the lower section of the shield.

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