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My first bike was a 1964 Honda CB 160. Honda said, “You meet the nicest people on a Honda”. Damm they were right. It was the end of spring semester at Michigan State and I needed a summer job. I could work for the State going around to small airports taking surveys of small plane arrivals (needed a car). Or, my Uncle could get me a job in Aurora, Ill. at All Steel Equipment making office furniture (didn’t need a car). I purchased a new CB 160 for $625.00 and took the job in Aurora. It was the best $625 I ever spent in my life. I had more fun on that bike. It was my street bike, my dirt bike, my everything bike.

Now I have a 04 Goldwing. Then you could buy long neck Buds for $3.95 a case and they came in a waxed box with two flaps on the top, with two bungee cords it made a perfect top case.

Aurora is 40 miles west of Chicago and one weekend I party in Chicago on State Street, Rush Street, and Lake Shore Drive. The next weekend I’d head home to party. Home was 2.5 miles south of a small town in western Michigan called Custer. There are more living things in my computer case than there were people in Custer, but it was the greatest place in the world to grow up as kid. I worked the swing shift in Aurora and Friday night my Bud box was pack, bungeed on my bike, and ready to go. Midnight I’d hit the road for Milwaukee and take the ferry across to Ludington ($6.00 for me and my bike round trip). I never heard of NASCAR then but I sure learned how to draft big rigs. The best my 160 would do with the Bud bag was 55 maybe 60 with a tail wind. When a rig would pass my I’d cut in behind them and hope for the best. If they were going too fast you would loose them before you caught the draft. Once you caught the draft you could feel yourself being sucked in. The engine would be screaming and you would hear it slowing down to a purr. You were like in your own little eggshell. There was no wind and all you heard was the sound of tires on the road. You could move around in the draft and feel the edges. It would be late at night and not much traffic and I’d poke my head every once in a while to see what was up ahead and let the driver know I was there. Most of the drivers were nice and would tap their brakes well in advance to let me know they were slowing down. The thing to do was catch the fastest rig. You had to do it in stages. If you were drafting a rig at 65 MPH and one came by at 75MPH it was an iffy situation. Once you pulled out you caught the turbulence between the trucks and it would slow you down. If the rig you were trying to draft was going too fast you could not catch his draft and you’d loose both of them and have to start over. Like trying to catch a wave surfing, you’re right at the crest paddling like hell, are you going to make it, are you going to make it, ah you did. You could feel the wind at your back, come on baby suck me in, you can do it. I made it, now I’m doing 75. I always waved to the driver I was just drifting and thanked him as I went by. Now is there any driver doing 80+, come on by, I’m waiting. Thinking about it now I was nuts, but then I was 20 and having the time of my life.
 

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DANGEROUS STUPID UNSAFE CRAZY WHAT WERE YOU THINKING..... :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: ...










keeps you dry in the rain too!!!!!!!! :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:


chuck



once!! I just did it once...maybe...D%$#% I wish I was young & dumb AGAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


1970 CB350.......D%$#$ I wish I would have kept that bike!!!!!!!!!!
 

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used to do that on my BRAND NEW 1972 CB750 ...
I think it was around $1,295.00?

Never gave a thought about "overloading" it.
Heck, if the rims were not yet touching the pavment, it was good to go!
(did not have any wobbles)

Did 10,000 miles in one summer, two up ... camping trip.
... BIG homemade saddlebags (still have those), bigger than my 1800
... and a rack on the back with a cooler and the camping gear.
One lap around the whole perimeter of U.S. of A.

Replaced 1 rear tire and 1 chain at about 7K miles.
Did not HAVE to, but the chain was half-stretched and the tire was getting thin.

I recall the whole trip cost me less than $600.

EVERYBODY waved back then.

amazing we're all still here
:roll:

Dennis
 

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I did the same thing back in the 60's when I had a Harley "165" .. a few times I drafted a Greyhound bus.... once coming back from Pensacola
to New Orleans... when I arrived in New Orleans my face was black from the soot from the diesel engine..
Yeah.. amazing I am still here to tell the story..

cosmic
 

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draft

HONDA 175CB :22yikes:

There are too many things that I wouldn't do now that I did back in the 70's. But it was fun!
 

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Honda CB160 - I had the same model as my first bike when I was in the Navy in the Norfolk, VA area. I did not draft trucks with it but I did something equally dumb. There was this long 3 mile stretch just before getting to the gate at Damn Neck, VA base. I wanted to know how fast it would go so I laid stomach down on the tank and seat with my legs going straight back so only my helmet and arms caught any wind. I got it to 91mph indicated before the valves floated and one of the pistons came up before the valve got out of the way and bent. I replaced it in the parking lot and had to give it one more go (I was a slow learner back then) because I thought it might top the ton. This time it went up to 94mph before bending two valves. I guess I found the limit of that design without going to stronger valve springs.

It was true that it was a real all purpose machine, light enough to do a little off roading yet it would take you on a trip if you could stand the hours of constant vibration. I once took a two day ride with three other bikers to the Blue Ridge Parkway. Boy, did my butt feel like hamberger after that ride. I could do about 65mph on the flat stuff but they left me in the dust if the road started to climb at all. One friend had a Vincent Black Shadow, another a Honda 305 Dream, and the other a Honda 750 Super Sport. To say I was seriously outclassed is a huge understatement.

I also taught a friend to ride a motorcycle using that bike. We went to an abandoned sand quarry with different levels before ending in a spring fed lake at the lowest. I don't know if my instructions were at fault or he was in idiot, but he managed to drive it into the lake. He bailed just before it ended up nose down with the tail pipes just under water going... blup... blup... blup, as the cylinders with water.
:eek:4:

As we stood on the edge looking at the bubbles, I put my arm gently over his shoulders and then shoved his ass into the water and told him to haul it back out. We removes the spark plugs, drained the water from the points box, pumped it over to get most of the water out of the cylinders, and drained the oil/water out of the crankcase. It was only about 4 miles to base so we pushed it back and then let it air dry for a day. I put in new plugs, oil, and oil filter, and then kicked it over for about an hour before I got it running again. Never did open up the case or cylinders or do any sort of inspection of what damage we might have caused. I changed the oil again after about a week of riding. Other than a little corrosion of the aluminum, it ran just fine. What a great example of why I have owned Honda products for almost my entire riding career.
:clap2: :biker:
 

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My first ride was a Honda 50. I rode it to/from high school almost every day junior and senior year. Northern CA weather permitted year round riding, and at that age one is bullet proof, so 40 degrees was the same as 90 degrees.

With the throttle WFO, it might get all the way up to 40MPH. But, I was always looking for opportunities for a new land speed record on a Honda 50! Occasionally I took a road trip to Oakland. On the way home was a long down hill on the highway. Lay flat on the seat, throttle WFO and see what you get. What did you get? The answer? Bent push rods, of course. No electronic rev limiter needed.

I always carried a spare set of push rods. It only took a few minutes along the side of the road to swap them. Even when I did not have a spare set, I could hammer them straight and round and be on my way.

Life was so simple then!
 

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My first bike was a 64 Honda 150 dream. It was 4 years old and I was 11. After a couple months Dad bought my little brother, 9 at the time a Honda sport 50. Dont remember the year model. We rode those bikes till we finally killed the little 50 on a deserted stretch of road about 15 miles south of town. We took a rope and tied it on behind the 150 and pulled it back home. We never did get around to fixing it. We just kept it tied on behind my ride and we rode everywhere like that. Finally after bout a year the 150 was so worn out it wouldn't start anymore. So it was time to fix them. Last time I remember seeing them they were both in a box out on the front porch.
 

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Drafted a semi across Indiana once. 1962, I was going from Oregon to New York City, returning from leave while in the army, riding a 250 Zundapp. Stayed about 200 feet behind that big truck to avoid the wind that was gusting and making life miserable.

Of all the riding I have done, that was about the dumbest. 3,176 miles on a two cycle bike that was a POS when I left home. Got the first 100 miles, and thought, 'This could be a big mistake.' Got the second 100 miles and decided, 'This IS a big mistake.' Decided to ride it until it would go no further, then grab a bus. That damn bike just kept going...and going...and going.... Finally got out on Long Island to the base, and decided that bike would never see the west coast again. But it made the trip, wore out two tires and two spark plugs. And me.

So, I traded it for an old Ariel. New mistake.
 
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