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Discussion Starter #1
would like to just add front Traxion springs to my 07.
(just the front springs .... FOR NOW.... :lol: ).

The bike is only two months old with about 3200 miles so I don't think I need to change the fork oil yet.

Questions:
Do I have to remove the forks from the bike?
If I lower the forks after I add the springs will that keep my bike stock height?
(I've just lowered the seat a bit so I DON'T want to raise the bike at all).

any other "how to" tips or "gotchas" to be concerned about?

Thanks,
Dennis
 

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No, you don't need to remove the forks for spring install.

If you have a short inseam, you might rethink aftermarket springs. It's been my experience they will increase the ride height a great deal. Max can probably tell you by exactly how much.

What's wrong with the OEM springs at 3,000 miles?

Good Luck.....
 

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Red said:
What's wrong with the OEM springs at 3,000 miles?
.....
The are .70kg/mm. That is a proper spring rate for a 100cc streetbike.

They weren't good with zero miles, never mind 3,000.

BTW, they don't "change" per se. They were just wrong in the first place.

:)
 

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It is possible to change the springs on the bike. Lots of people do.

But we don't do it that way, mainly because it can be quite messy, and you run the risk of scratching tupperware, and it's inconvenient to work around the dash.

We just take the forks off. Even if you didn't know what you were doing, it shouldn't take more than 30 minutes. We can take the forks off and on a Goldwing in under 30 minutes with hand tools.

You don't have to take anything apart on the dash. The plastic dust covers over the fork tops you can just bend up out of the way. They bend straight up and will lay back down when you are done, don't worry.

The oil in the left fork will already be dirty. The right will be OK.

:wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Max McAllister said:
It is possible to change the springs on the bike. Lots of people do.

But we don't do it that way, mainly because it can be quite messy, and you run the risk of scratching tupperware, and it's inconvenient to work around the dash.

We just take the forks off. Even if you didn't know what you were doing, it shouldn't take more than 30 minutes. We can take the forks off and on a Goldwing in under 30 minutes with hand tools.

You don't have to take anything apart on the dash. The plastic dust covers over the fork tops you can just bend up out of the way. They bend straight up and will lay back down when you are done, don't worry.

The oil in the left fork will already be dirty. The right will be OK.

:wink:
Max,
thanks for that info ...

what about the ride height ...?

Thanks,
Dennis
 

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ooops, sorry.

The front of the bike will sit over an inch higher. Most people lower the front of the bike 10mm to help compensate for the geometry change.

On a "spring only" setup, you can easily lower it another 10mm if you want, with no worry of interference. (Our AK-20s our lowered another 10mm internally.)

But that is at the front of the fairing. Your seat height will not change much at all.
 

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skip h said:
Max,
Why not set the forks up 1" if it raises up the front by 1"??
1. The fork legs could bang into the lower triple clamp.

2. That would dramatically alter the steering geometry at the point where the bike bottoms out.

The 1" comes from not having the bike sit so far down on the springs that can't hold it up.
:)
 

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Ron Leonard said:
[quote="Max McAllister":37yhpo5k]The oil in the left fork will already be dirty. The right will be OK.
Max, what weight oil do you recommend with a fork spring change?[/quote:37yhpo5k]


Bit of debate about that, here is the detailed version:

Antidive functioning: Left fork, thinnest oil you can find. 3WT shock oil.

Antidive disabled: It doesn't matter, whatever you have in the other leg.

Right leg hot climates: 20 wt

Right leg normal climates: 15wt

Right leg cold climates:5-10wt depending on just how cold and how long it's cold!

Note that unfortunately, as you go up in viscosity, the fork will be more controlled, but less compliant over sharp bumps. This is because the double damped right cartridge can't handle sharp bumps.
 
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