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Brand new rear BS tire picks up deck screw so used dynaplug to plug tire. I had difficult time loading the sticky rope into the applicator and once in, after inserting the dynaplug into screw hole and pulling out, the metal point from the sticky thread broke off inside the tire as the remaining rope was 'stuck' inside the delivery tool. I ended up using sticky rope to seal the tire but am concerned if the remaining pointed metal dynaplug tip will cause any type of damage floating around inside the tire. Not really looking to have to remove tire, break bead and fetch it if it is a non issue. Feedback welcome.
 

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Even though I do not "think" the plug head would do any harm, I would break down the tire assembly and retrieve it. It would bug me knowing it was in there rattling about. Monkey Grip makes a more slim sticky rope plug for the smaller perfs.

prs
 

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I would only use a plug to get me to a shop. Then either replace the tire or have it properly patched from the inside. So if it where me I'd pull the tire and remove the tip and have a proper patch put on the inside.
If the bike has tpms chances are good that broken tip will damage the sensor.
 

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Okay, before the hysteria about the tip sets in, some common sense backed up by engineering testing is in order.

1. The tip will cause no damage.

2. Let me repeat myself, the tip will cause no damage.

Okay, now for the engineering part of it. We do testing for the majority of the OEMs, including failure analysis (anyone remember the Firestone fiasco?) One of the things we have tested is durability of the TPMS systems. Besides the fact the TPMS is on the inside of the tire next to the rim, and the dynabeads, or little bits of casting rubber, or the tip of a dynaplug is on the outside of the tire, the mass involved cannot nor will not be able to do any damage to the TPMS. Nor will it cause any damage to the tire.

And in fact, when you do remove the tire after a long and successful life, you'll find the tip is now but a little ball of brass. Plus, do you really think the tip would stay attached to the sticky rope after many thousands of miles? And that the manufacturer wouldn't have tested that small fact before putting it on the market?

Now as to why the plug stayed inside of the tool, possibly the tip connection was damaged by excessive flexing during the rolling before insertion into the tool, or perhaps just a bad crimp job. Either way, it happened, that's why there's a pipe cleaner included in the kit to get the plug and residue out of the tool. So reload and replug the tire.

I've used dynaplugs many times - and had good success. I like the fact it does a small hole without needing to ream the tire to make the hole big enough for a sticky rope (which I've also used many times). Sorry you've had a bad experience.

And I do not have any vested interest in one style of plug over another, although I'm not a big fan of the rubber umbrella ones. Haven't had good luck with those.

But to sum it up - you risk more damage to the tire dismounting it to remove an inconsequential item than you ever will by leaving it in the tire. Think of it as an extra dynabead.

I now return you to your regulary scheduled programming, and refer you to items one and two above.
 

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I've had them break off and roll around inside my tires as well. I like the DynaPlug overall, but this is one of its weaknesses. I've ridden tires with the tip rolling around inside it for many thousands of miles, even with TPMS sensors in my wheels, and it hasn't caused me any problems. But still, I'd rather they not fall off to begin with. I think the movement of the belts pinch them off in the same way they do the heads of rubber mushroom plugs.
 

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Okay, before the hysteria about the tip sets in, some common sense backed up by engineering testing is in order.

1. The tip will cause no damage.

2. Let me repeat myself, the tip will cause no damage.

Okay, now for the engineering part of it. We do testing for the majority of the OEMs, including failure analysis (anyone remember the Firestone fiasco?) One of the things we have tested is durability of the TPMS systems. Besides the fact the TPMS is on the inside of the tire next to the rim, and the dynabeads, or little bits of casting rubber, or the tip of a dynaplug is on the outside of the tire, the mass involved cannot nor will not be able to do any damage to the TPMS. Nor will it cause any damage to the tire.

And in fact, when you do remove the tire after a long and successful life, you'll find the tip is now but a little ball of brass. Plus, do you really think the tip would stay attached to the sticky rope after many thousands of miles? And that the manufacturer wouldn't have tested that small fact before putting it on the market?

Now as to why the plug stayed inside of the tool, possibly the tip connection was damaged by excessive flexing during the rolling before insertion into the tool, or perhaps just a bad crimp job. Either way, it happened, that's why there's a pipe cleaner included in the kit to get the plug and residue out of the tool. So reload and replug the tire.

I've used dynaplugs many times - and had good success. I like the fact it does a small hole without needing to ream the tire to make the hole big enough for a sticky rope (which I've also used many times). Sorry you've had a bad experience.

And I do not have any vested interest in one style of plug over another, although I'm not a big fan of the rubber umbrella ones. Haven't had good luck with those.

But to sum it up - you risk more damage to the tire dismounting it to remove an inconsequential item than you ever will by leaving it in the tire. Think of it as an extra dynabead.

I now return you to your regulary scheduled programming, and refer you to items one and two above.
A MOST EXCELLENT RESPONSE! Hopefully the hysteria will be quelled.
prs

Fred, my experiences with the mushroom plugs being pinched in half have occurred in heavier pick-up truck tires that have substantial belts, including steel belts. Our cycle tires, at least the ones I have taken the trouble to section, have no steel belts and the cording layers are pretty thin and flimsy, yet the result is apparently the same as you have reported. The flex of the tire carcass seems to be enough to shear those little buggers. The tough fiber and live rubber of the sticky rope pugs not only survive that very well, but apparently become part and parcel of the original tire rubber; a feat even the most expertly cold patch can not achieve unless there is something out there I have missed. I have not used the dyna plugs because I am well supplied with the smaller variety of sticky ropes as well as the more typical fat sticky ropes; do the dyna plugs have a fiber "foundation" too?

prs
 

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A MOST EXCELLENT RESPONSE! Hopefully the hysteria will be quelled.
prs

Fred, my experiences with the mushroom plugs being pinched in half have occurred in heavier pick-up truck tires that have substantial belts, including steel belts. Our cycle tires, at least the ones I have taken the trouble to section, have no steel belts and the cording layers are pretty thin and flimsy, yet the result is apparently the same as you have reported. The flex of the tire carcass seems to be enough to shear those little buggers. The tough fiber and live rubber of the sticky rope pugs not only survive that very well, but apparently become part and parcel of the original tire rubber; a feat even the most expertly cold patch can not achieve unless there is something out there I have missed. I have not used the dyna plugs because I am well supplied with the smaller variety of sticky ropes as well as the more typical fat sticky ropes; do the dyna plugs have a fiber "foundation" too?

prs
Well sir - I thank you for the compliment. :bow: I'm not Fred, but the answer to the dynaplug question is yes it is a fibrous tarry-rubbery plug that becomes one with the tire. Also known as a permanent repair for the ones I've used. And I'm glad to see I wasn't the only one to have problems with those umbrella-mushroom type plugs.
 

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I don't think it's rolling around except at really low speeds, it's being pushed to the outside and just going around and around with the tire. Biggest concern would be the plugged tire, I'm cautious about that....
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Brand new rear BS tire picks up deck screw so used dynaplug to plug tire. I had difficult time loading the sticky rope into the applicator and once in, after inserting the dynaplug into screw hole and pulling out, the metal point from the sticky thread broke off inside the tire as the remaining rope was 'stuck' inside the delivery tool. I ended up using sticky rope to seal the tire but am concerned if the remaining pointed metal dynaplug tip will cause any type of damage floating around inside the tire. Not really looking to have to remove tire, break bead and fetch it if it is a non issue. Feedback welcome.


Thanks everyone for the responses. While I don't have TMPS with my 2005 model, I was curious about that tiny tip remaining in the tire cavity but also felt it would really only bang around a bit at slow speed. I must have employed poor technique with the Dynaplug loading and overworked the plug trying to get it into the dispensing tube; thereby leaving the tidbit behind upon extraction. Not to start a debate regarding plugged tires practice but I have no heartburn over riding with a plugged tire and have done so in the past. Only thing noted was the plug can start to leak as tire wear appraches wear bars. Again, tks all.
 

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Oh NO ! The tip will throw off all of the tire balance. Interesting topic, now if my dynaplug ever breaks, I will not worry either. :thumbup:
 

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ssncob....I just purchased the DynaPlug kit last week before embarking on a 4 day trip and didn't have to use it yet but I was just wondering if their is something to look for or do to prevent this from happening. I have never used this particular plugging tool before.
TIA
 

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Tire plugger in tire

Having run a tire shop for 20 years I can guarantee you the piece floating inside the car will cause you problems. It will slowly grind down the inner liner of the tire and eventually the tire will start leaking. I would break the tire down and attempt to use an extendable magnet to grab the piece.
 

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I don't think the little head is magnetic. Not sure, but from pics I have seen, I thought the tips were brass. Probably have to brake tire all the way off the rim if not comfortable with it in there.

I took a peek into my kit today and noticed I had two different models of small diameter sticky rope type plugs, both marketed under the Victor trade mark; previously I said they were Monkey Grip branded, but probably still made by same company.

prs
 

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Having run a tire shop for 20 years I can guarantee you the piece floating inside the car will cause you problems. It will slowly grind down the inner liner of the tire and eventually the tire will start leaking. I would break the tire down and attempt to use an extendable magnet to grab the piece.
Having worked in a garage for many years, and now doing testing for the OEM's and Tier One suppliers - I have to respectfully disagree with your statement. Here's the reasons.

First - the mass of the tip is insignificant, it's on the order less than a couple of grams. (Dynabeads are 3 ounces = 85 grams. Tip is at max maybe 2 grams. So tip is 2% of the amount of dynabeads that are used - end result - ZERO effect. Note: Dynabeads are ceramic, tip is brass. Ceramic is considerably harder than brass.

Second - to have an abrasive effect the tip would have to have large relative movement between the tip and the tire. As the tire is rotating, the tip will travel to the centrifugal balance point just like dynabeads and then have little to no relative movement occuring.

Third - the tip is relatively smooth, with no sharp or rough edges to provide a scrubbing action.

Fourth - the outside of the tire is in constant friction with the road surface, which is whole lot more abrasive than the little Dyanplug tip could ever hope to be. Don't see the tires suddenly disintegrating from all that friction. (and yes, the outside is a bit harder compound but the point is made).

Fifth - tip is brass, non-magnetic.

And as I mentioned earlier - you risk way more damage to the tire bead by pulling the tire to remove a tiny tip than the damage the tip will ever cause.
 

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ssncob....I just purchased the DynaPlug kit last week before embarking on a 4 day trip and didn't have to use it yet but I was just wondering if their is something to look for or do to prevent this from happening. I have never used this particular plugging tool before.TIA
The only time I've had problems with the dyanplug is when I tried to shove it in at the wrong angle. Not aligned with the angle of the hole - have your tool ready to use and when you remove the nail, look at the angle it came out at and immediately push the dynaplug in at the same angle.

Prior to inserting the plug into the tool, they recommend rolling it in your fingers to compress it slightly to slide into the tool. I compress it slightly more than needed so it will slide easily back out of the tool once inserted. I try not to over-flex up by the tip to lessen the possibility of weakening the tip joint area. While holding the plug, I gently pull on the tip to ensure it's on tight enough to hold the plug in place after insertion, then stick it into the tool.

Sounds like a lot of steps, really isn't. It's actually kind of automatic for me. Rotate tire to get nail at a position I can easily remove. Grad the Dyanplug tool and get a plug out. Roll it a couple of times to make it skinnier, mild tug on the end and insert in tool. Grab nail with pliers, wiggle it out, shove dyanplug in fully, pull tool out, cut off excess plug sticking out and good to go. Put more air in tire, and drive off monitoring the TPMS for a bit to ensure sealing. Dyanplug says you can use up to three plugs in one hole. Most I've done is two (first plug had some leakage), more than that it's big enough hole to use a sticky rope.

There have been a couple of repairs I've done where there was still a bit of air leakage around the plug after insertion (I wipe some spit on the area to check). But was very minor, so aired the tire and rode a bit then checked. The rolling and flexing of the tire allowed the plug to fully conform and seal the hole. Rode the tire till it was time to replace due to wear.
 

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I've repaired several tires now with the Dynaplug, and the tip came off inside the tire on about half of them and rolled around inside the tire for the rest of it's life until it wore out and I changed it. I just pulled an old one off my spare rim about 2 weeks ago that had the tip of a Dynaplug inside it. It seems like the brass tip is not attached all that well to the end of the string plug, and I think the movement of the tire carcass shears/saws/pinches them off. I've seen the same thing happen to the heads of rubber mushroom plugs. It hasn't seemed to cause any problems, but I do wish the head of it wouldn't come off so easily. I've actually broken the head off a couple Dynaplugs while trying to insert them into the tool.

The up-side is that I've not found anything better for plugging small holes. The slim profile of the Dynaplug tool and Dynaplug itself means the repair is minimally invasive on the tire carcass, and so it doesn't stretch out the hole and make it worse. It is also about the easiest tire repair tool to use, and you can even plug a tire that still has air in it and just ride off, and you don't have to mess with glue.



 
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