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Discussion Starter #1
I have used the search, and it has come up empty... I just want to know why Hal and other vendors are unable to provide value based Extended warranties here in FL. It seems that we are the only state he is unable to deal and I find that hard to believe. It would seem if he is able to charge us sales tax because of a warehouse, he should also be able to sell the warranty.

I am looking for the real reason and not speculation. i want to know whos desk i need to cross...
 
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If you change your mind and decide you'd like to have some speculation after all, I'd be only too happy to help.
 

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I believe the answer is that Florida views warranty contracts as insurance, and that insurance policies cannot be discounted in Florida. I would check with the Florida Department of Insurance in Tallahassee.

I think the specific answer lies in http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/ind ... ch0634.htm

I'll try to review this and post my comments.

ProBono
 

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Ken is right according to what Hal and others have posted here.
It is viewed as insurance and Florida will not allow discounts on insurance.

'Course you would think Ken would get it right.
 

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They are correct. We gave it a try when we bought our VFRs last week, and got the same answer. If you're in FL, you're stuck with buying the warranty from a Florida dealer, with no discounts...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok, being the type of person that finds the hole to walk through, what address does he need? What is I have moved to say Virginia? I do still have a VA license....
The next question is who in Florida is selling close to Hals prices?
 

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Rinkopr said:
Ok, being the type of person that finds the hole to walk through, what address does he need? What is I have moved to say Virginia? I do still have a VA license....
The next question is who in Florida is selling close to Hals prices?
You have to be smarter than the system! Is the bike registered in Va? If it's registered anywhere beside here it would be a cakewalk.

Nobody in Fl is selling close to Hal's price. Not that I've seen over the years.

Sorry, but some of the above might just be SPECULATION....... LMAO!!!!
 

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radbikers said:
They are correct. We gave it a try when we bought our VFRs last week, and got the same answer. If you're in FL, you're stuck with buying the warranty from a Florida dealer, with no discounts...
FYI.....
To sell you the warranty at a discount all you had to do was have them back the price of the bike down, say $250 each, then show full retail for the warranties! Guess you didn't try that. :(
 

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We'd already hammered them down on the price of the bikes...got a real good deal on them.
 

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radbikers said:
We'd already hammered them down on the price of the bikes...got a real good deal on them.
What I just mentioned doesn't have a thing to do with the price of the bikes or the profit on those bikes. Just the price you paid for the warranties.
 
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Please look for text in RED:

Are Extended Warranties for You?


Written by Kate McLeod



Shopping Advice
Maintaining the Bells and Whistles: How Much Will Technology Cost You?
Repairs and Your Insurance Agency
Are Extended Warranties for You?
Luckily for consumers, most vehicles and their electronic systems are very well built today. If any electronic system fails under warranty — and they do from time to time — they are replaced by the dealer. Warranties are getting longer, sometimes covering up to five years, and everyone has car insurance that covers most damage caused by accidents. But there may be a big deductible, and if the claim is big enough, you can be certain your rates are going to escalate.
Car buyers aren’t going to forego sexy options because they might get slammed with a $6,000 repair bill sometime in the distant future — no one buys cars that way. But knowing there’s a risk for sticker shock on a repair helps evaluate the true cost to own and operate a vehicle.


Related Story:
Making Sense of Vehicle Warranties
Once your vehicle’s warranty expires, it pays to consider buying additional coverage, often referred to as an extended warranty. Extended warranties work like other warranties, with different levels that can cover electrical, mechanical or computer systems. When you purchase a car, you can usually get the extended contract at a discount, or you can purchase it anytime thereafter at a higher cost.

There is a legal difference between a warranty and what is commonly called an extended warranty. A true warranty is included in the price of the product and must by law be provided at no additional cost. An extended warranty is really a vehicle service contract sold either by the original manufacturer, dealership or a third party at an extra cost. This contract operates like an insurance policy.

“We recommend checking our reliability ratings on your vehicle before you purchase a vehicle service contract,” said David Champion, director of the Auto Test Department at Consumer Reports. “If you’re buying a vehicle with above-average reliability, you could put the money you would spend on an extended warranty into a CD. If something happens, you have the money there to pay for repairs, and if it’s left over you have a nice little down payment for your next car. If a car has average or below-average reliability and you’re going to keep it, it is going to be worth it to buy a vehicle service contract.”

Another way to check reliability is through manufacturers’ technical service bulletins, available either through manufacturers' websites, or through links from the National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration’s website. This helps you keep tabs on model recalls and defects.

Next you should estimate how long you plan to keep the car. The average length of ownership is now 5.2 years, according to the Power Information Network. It might not pay to purchase an extended warranty that could cost anywhere from $1,500 to $2,000 if you’re thinking of trading in, though some of these warranties are transferable to a new owner. This would be valuable to you if you choose to sell your vehicle privately. If you are going to trade in with a dealer, check the contract to see if you are eligible for a pro rata refund if you turn the car in before the contract expires.

If you choose to sign a contract for either warranty, the Federal Trade Commission advises the consumer to follow all manufacturer recommendations for routine maintenance, such as oil changes, and to keep detailed records of maintenance, including receipts. Failure to follow manufacturer recommendations may void the contract or give a service contract provider a way out. “Fine print is the killer with extended warranties,” said Champion. “The biggest issue is what they claim is normal wear and tear.”


View the Cost of Repair slideshow >
The price of the contract is set by the dealer, the cost of which varies according to the vehicle model and make. “We provide the dealers with a suggested selling price in all states except Florida, where the price is mandated,” said John A. Gressa, director of marketing and development for the GM Protection Plan. “But in most cases the dealer offers the product at a price they want.”

You can buy a factory warranty at any dealership, so shop around on the Internet to find the best price and ask your dealer to match it. Even if you buy the contract from an out-of-state dealer, your dealer will honor a manufacturer-backed contract. When you negotiate with your dealer, be sure to clarify who is backing the service contract — the manufacturer, the dealer or an independent company.

Consumer advocates are wary of third-party contracts. “Basically, don’t go with an independent, because they tend to be difficult to claim from,” Champion said. “We prefer the ones that are backed by manufacturers. At least you can go into the dealer and talk to a representative of the company and say, ‘This is backed by you, and you need to honor it.’ If you go the third-party route, you probably won’t be able to get hold of a person and wring their neck.”

OEM vehicle service contracts don’t require you to pay up front and wait for reimbursement, which can happen with third-party contracts. Up front, third-party warranties may seem cheaper, but they are riskier and less convenient. If you choose to buy an extended warranty from a third party, make sure they have a minimum “A” rating with Standard & Poor’s, which provides independent credit ratings and risk evaluations at no cost, if the information is available.

Many states subject service contract providers to insurance regulations that require the provider to maintain an adequate financial reserve to pay claims and base their contract fees on expected claims. Confirm the solvency of the contract provider with your state insurance commission. “You do have recourse through your state attorney general’s office, the Better Business Bureau or small claims court, but it is a lot of effort,” said Champion.

Also, check to see if there are restrictions on where you can go for repairs and if you need prior authorization. Be sure to find out how long it takes to get that authorization and if you can get it outside of normal business hours. Warranties issued by manufacturers will generally allow you to repair your vehicle at any authorized dealer. Often, extended warranties only allow you repairs at your local dealer or in a specific geographic area — inconvenient, to say the least, if you break down on vacation or miles from home.

“We’ve structured our program to contribute to the ownership experience for the customer,” said Gressa. “We’re going to do everything we can to satisfy that customer. When a customer goes into one of our dealerships, we can verify that there’s a service contract within two minutes and we submit all our claims through our system. The customer comes back, picks up the vehicle and that’s it, unless they have a contract that has a deductible of $100 or $200. We’re looking for ways to satisfy the customer rather than looking for ways not to satisfy the claim.”

Published on 7/26/06 Forbes
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Hal, That is exactly what I was looking for. So now the question is who mandates the price?
 

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Rinkopr said:
... So now the question is who mandates the price?
Why care who mandates the price in Florida?

Perhaps your question should be: Where (outside of Florida) can you get an extended warranty for the best price.

Now go back and read his post again. :wink:

You can buy a factory warranty at any dealership, so shop around on the Internet to find the best price ....
 
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All Boots No Saddle said:
Rinkopr said:
... So now the question is who mandates the price?
Why care who mandates the price in Florida?

Perhaps your question should be: Where (outside of Florida) can you get an extended warranty for the best price.

Now go back and read his post again. :wink:

You can buy a factory warranty at any dealership, so shop around on the Internet to find the best price ....
A Florida resident can not buy the extended warranty from a non-Florida dealer. Honda will not process the paperwork.
 

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Hal @ Honda Direct Line said:
You can buy a factory warranty at any dealership, so shop around on the Internet to find the best price .... Even if you buy the contract from an out-of-state dealer, your dealer will honor a manufacturer-backed contract.
A Florida resident can not buy the extended warranty from a non-Florida dealer. Honda will not process the paperwork.
Hmmm... Okay... I guess I read the text you posted differently.
 

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Hal @ Honda Direct Line said:
[quote="All Boots No Saddle":3ov7y4va]
Rinkopr said:
... So now the question is who mandates the price?
Why care who mandates the price in Florida?

Perhaps your question should be: Where (outside of Florida) can you get an extended warranty for the best price.

Now go back and read his post again. :wink:

You can buy a factory warranty at any dealership, so shop around on the Internet to find the best price ....
A Florida resident can not buy the extended warranty from a non-Florida dealer. Honda will not process the paperwork.[/quote:3ov7y4va]

When I bought my '02 new from Lawrenceville Honda I was able to buy the extended warranty at the time of sale. The dealer is in GA and I live in FL. Maybe I was only able to do it because it was with a new purchase. Anyway Honda did process the paperwork then.
 
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The only loophole that I am aware of is if you are physically at another dealer when you buy the warranty. But don't quote me on that as things change.
 
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