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2007 GL1800. Today, I ran through an empty parking lot to practice some slow speed U-turns and after about 30 seconds the fans kicked on. Ambient temp was 80 degrees and the bike was not running hot. This happened a few days ago when we were waiting to get through a construction zone. Fans came on. Also, when the fans do come on the engine rpms fluctuate a few hundred rpm.

I found a thread from the original owner with the same complaint and he received much good advice but sadly, her never returned to that thread. 9 years later the issue remains. I did check the fluid level on the port on the left side of the engine, but will check the overflow and the radiator cap.

Any other ideas? What would make the engine surge like that?
 

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When you say the bike was not running hot, how do you know, by the temp gauge?

The reason I ask is that if the temp gauge is anything like most car gauges since the early 80's, it's not actually a linear gauge that moves up and down as the temperature moves up and down, it's just a rough indicator that moves up and down in big discrete "steps".

So the temperature of the engine can vary quite a lot within a normal range but the needle on the gauge won't move at all.
 

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When you say the bike was not running hot, how do you know, by the temp gauge?

The reason I ask is that if the temp gauge is anything like most car gauges since the early 80's, it's not actually a linear gauge that moves up and down as the temperature moves up and down, it's just a rough indicator that moves up and down in big discrete "steps".

So the temperature of the engine can vary quite a lot within a normal range but the needle on the gauge won't move at all.
Temp gauge had not moved. I also had only been riding for a few minutes since leaving my last stop. That's all I know. Once I left the parking lot, the fans quit running. I am more concerned about the surging than the fans running.
 

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Idle is controlled by the ECM, fan operation is controlled by the ECM. If you went to Honda, they might sell you an ECM. I’d confirm good grounds throughout the bike before the big money gets involved. Or you have the HD (potato-potato) edition cooling system. Sorry, not on my best behavior today :)
 

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Idle is controlled by the ECM, fan operation is controlled by the ECM. If you went to Honda, they might sell you an ECM. I’d confirm good grounds throughout the bike before the big money gets involved. Or you have the HD (potato-potato) edition cooling system. Sorry, not on my best behavior today :)
I found a ground loop isolated behind the left pocket. What does that do?
 

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Ground loop isolators are for audio. They cancel out alternating current oscillations generated by the charging system. Heard in your headset while riding.
 

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Ground loop isolators are for audio. They cancel out alternating current oscillations generated by the charging system. Heard in your headset while riding.
Thanks!
 

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The battery is new. Alternator is the original as far as I know.
 

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This is my third Goldwing, the other two did not surge when the fans were running.
Fans (especially ones with bad bearings/windings) can place a substantial load on alternator which can pull the engine rpm down.
 
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Discussion Starter #16
Fans (especially ones with bad bearings/windings) can place a substantial load on alternator which can pull the engine rpm down.
Would this be apparent to someone with moderately good hearing?
 

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In certain situations, I've seen my rpms oscillate at an idle. If for whatever reason, the rpms drop a bit too low, the alternator is turned off (or way down). I can verify that with my volt meter. Once the alternator is off, there is less load and the rpms come back up. Which turns the alternator back on. I don't know that I could reproduce this, but I have seen it happen more than once.

This is not severe and I probably wouldn't even notice had I not had a voltmeter. I believe this symptom would be exaggerated if the fans were on. Bottom line is that you may not have a problem at all. This is just my .02 and may be total b/s. :)
 
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