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I finally found some time to swap out the final drive on my 2010 wing with 142k on the clock. Not that it's gone south but just because I have a new 0 miles 2012 trikeoff final drive sitting on the shelf since 2012 that I got on ebay from honda of Russellville, Arkansas back in 2012. I also picked up a new drive shaft on ebay as well. So the process was pretty easy and went smooth about 2 hours or so. I never hit a snag or busted a knuckle. I checked over the old drive shaft and if I didn't know better, I'd think it was new but I replaced it with the new one anyway. Now I'm waiting on spring to do a shakedown run.


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I see a CT, is that yours ??? The reason I ask is that there is a FB page I hang out on where most run CTs on 5th gens, and collectively they report an unusual amount of final drive failure rate. Over here of coarse there are expected failures, but over there, with a much smaller following, sometimes in a 1 month period there can be 3.
 

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Nice info and pictures thanks I brought a new final drive and a new tail shaft about 10 years ago from the US they are still in my garage cupboard I guess one day i will replace the original drive line system which on my 03 is still going good at around 205K (y)
 

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I see a CT, is that yours ??? The reason I ask is that there is a FB page I hang out on where most run CTs on 5th gens, and collectively they report an unusual amount of final drive failure rate. Over here of coarse there are expected failures, but over there, with a much smaller following, sometimes in a 1 month period there can be 3.
My thoughts are there are more loads added to the final drive with a wider tire.
 

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I see a CT, is that yours ??? The reason I ask is that there is a FB page I hang out on where most run CTs on 5th gens, and collectively they report an unusual amount of final drive failure rate. Over here of coarse there are expected failures, but over there, with a much smaller following, sometimes in a 1 month period there can be 3.
Greg, I'm the original owner and have put 120 thousand miles on her running and CT and now it has142 thousand on her and I've had zero issues with this final drive. I just swapped it with the 0 mile one on the shelf for no reason. I did it just because.

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My thoughts are there are more loads added to the final drive with a wider tire.
There has to be. The angular forces have all changed and been moved farther out. There'd be far more stress on the side bearings.
 

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What actually happens to cause a final drive to fail ? Too much backlash, a bearing failure or ?????
Like all mechanical parts, most fail on a common bell curve. Which means some fail early while others fail late, with most failing right on time in the middle of the curve. Usually they get noisy. Some will fail because a seal leaks. As for what actually causes them to fail, most here, including me, will probably never really know. In almost all cases, they never get taken apart ... just swapped out for a trike take off. Almost all of the ones I've replaced are from noise and will have excessive metal on the drain plug magnet.
 

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Why do final drives go bad is one of the mysteries of the world. I replace more than most people that don't own a repair facility. I have replaced them with as low as 60k on the odo to 180k on the clock. My '01 was still going strong at 154k when I sold it and I let an almost new final drive go with it. My own bike had the final drive start making noise and leaking a little at 65k so I replaced it. I always keep a few on had to replace for people I know and people refered to me. I am holding a final drive for a friend that has a 2005 model that has, last I checked with him over 250k on the clock and he never has changed the oil in the final drive. I been expecting it to go any time but it keeps on going. "Flat earthers" will try and blame it on running CT's but I don't see that as a factor at all. The final that I replaced at 60k had never had a CT on it and by his own admission was a "flat earther" and never would. BTW the bike with over 250k on it runs a 60 series CT because of the higher mileage.
 

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I see a CT, is that yours ??? The reason I ask is that there is a FB page I hang out on where most run CTs on 5th gens, and collectively they report an unusual amount of final drive failure rate. Over here of coarse (sic) there are expected failures, but over there, with a much smaller following, sometimes in a 1 month period there can be 3.
There has to be. The angular forces have all changed and been moved farther out. There'd be far more stress on the side bearings.

Why are you frequenting a facebook page "where most run CTs" contrary to your opinion?

I disagree with your assertion that "There'd be FAR ( emphasis added) more stress." Do you have dynamic load calculations or experimental data to support this? Just based on examination of photographs comparing traditional toroidal MC tire and less toroidal CT, the contact patch, while wider, actually maintains a location relatively similar. Well within the tolerance of a MC tire.
 
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Why are you frequenting a facebook page "where most run CTs" contrary to your opinion?

I disagree with your assertion that "There'd be FAR ( emphasis added) more stress." I
As for FB ... I was invited and chose to accept the invitation. I help riders there too.

As for you disagreeing ... most will know that it is simple physics, and hopefully it is ok if we disagree. Sometimes it takes very little leverage to see a lot of change. A good example are tapered steering head bearings on 5th gen trikes. When easy-steer is added with a 4.5 degree different in the fork rake, new bearings begin to notch out at 12,000 miles. The same bearings without easy-steer and bearing life is at least twice as long.
 
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Anecdotal evidence should lead to a closer look, not sarcasm.

You are right. This is a thread where the OP replaced a ten year old final drive with 142,000 miles no issues whatsoever with a new one. Congratulations on a nicely done afternoon project. This is not the thread to broadcast rhetoric on the evils of darkside tires.
 
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