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A few days ago I posted on the Rides and Trips forum a notice of a planned BBG and a link to my SPOT tracker. I actually did get to make the ride, so I'm posting a report here.


I made my Bun Burner Gold ride Saturday, riding over 1500 miles in less than 24 hours. It worked out almost exactly as planned. I towed my Tailwind trailer behind my Goldwing, carrying lots of ice water, food I could eat while riding, and a few things I hoped I wouldn’t use such as a sleeping bag, tire repair kits, and a phase-change cooling vest that I acquired from my buddy TexWalter. Thanks, Walt. It really came in handy.


I left my house headed for Woodville a little after midnight Saturday morning. I first went to the Sheriff’s office to get my starting witness documents signed, turned on the SPOT tracker, and then gassed up to get the official starting time-stamped receipt. The official starting time was 1:03 AM.


I had set the trip timing based on riding in deer-infested West Texas in daylight hours. It worked well, as I got out of San Antonio at 6:00 AM, just as skies were beginning to lighten. It was full daylight by the time I stopped for fuel in Kerrville at 6:40 AM. The Goldwing’s on-board ambient temperature readout was 77º F. and riding was enjoyable.


Temperature had climbed to 102º F by 10:30 AM just west of Fort Stockton and I was drinking lots of water. I enjoyed seeing the huge wind turbines beginning at mile marker 307, just a little west of Sheffield, all the way to mile marker 283. This is 24 miles of wall-to-wall windmills. I wouldn’t be surprised to know that wind farm has over 1000 windmills. I also enjoy the rugged, desolate scenery in West Texas. I miss my mesquite trees. I know many here detest Interstate 10, saying it is the most boring road around. Well, I ALWAYS enjoy I-10, but then I just enjoy riding.


I made it to the halfway point at Fort Hancock at 12:51 PM, or 11 hours 48 minutes and 818 miles for an average of 69.3 mph including fuel stops. Temperature was still holding at 102º F., but I was feeling great. That changed fairly soon, as the sun began beating down on the hot asphalt, which radiated the heat back to me. By the time I got to Balmorhea at about 2:45PM the temperature of the air above the road was 113º F. I knew I better do something to keep my core temperature down. Hydration alone is not enough at those temperatures.


I originally hadn’t wanted to take the time to put on the phase-change vest, but the time had come. I had the gel packets in the ice chest, and I put them in the vest, then put on a heavy textile jacket over the vest. The heavy jacket sounds counter-intuitive in hot weather, but it allows the 65º F. gel packs to do their job and keep the wearer cool. The only downside is that it takes a few extra minutes to shed the jackets and change the gel packs when they expire after a couple of hours. On a timed ride every minute counts. If the wheels aren’t rolling you’re losing time.


This phase-change technology isn't Bubba-approved, but it beats nothing. One of these days (if I can ever lose weight and get back to my fighting shape) I will get the proper LD Comfort and Moto-Port gear and do it right. In the meantime, the phase-change technology works for me because I always have my Tailwind trailer and an ice chest to keep the gel-packets charged.

I stopped in Fort Stockton for fuel and to finish cooling off. I soaked my helmet with ice water, and changed out the gel packs with a fresh set from the ice chest. I rested in the air conditioner for about 20 minutes, until I started feeling better. Time to start making tracks.


Next fuel stop was in Ozona at 5:15 PM. The temperature had dropped to about 100º F, and I was feeling good enough to put the cooling vest and the heavy jacket back in the trailer, and don my mesh jacket instead. I made it through San Antonio a little after 8:00 PM, and the temperature was down to the high 80’s. Life is good.


I fueled up at Columbus at 10:15 PM. Knowing this was last stop till finish I began feeling much better. It would be over in about 2.5 hours. I was pretty sure I would not make it back to Woodville by 1:00 AM, but I knew I could make to Livingston and still have over 1500 miles.


By the way, I still hate the scary Houston traffic even at 11:30 PM. I also saw a group of about 20 crotch rocket riders on Loop 610 acting like they were in a hurry to become organ donors, weaving in and around the cars at over 100 mph.


I called it quits in Livingston at 12:41 AM with 1,597 miles in 23 hours, 38 minutes. Speed on the return leg was 65.8 mph, or 3.5 mph slower than on first leg. The Goldwing used 47.4 gallons of fuel for an average of 33.68 mpg. The average speed was 66.9 mph for the entire trip including the stops. If the average stop time was 10 minutes that means I was stopped for 110 minutes, making the average running speed 72 mph. I expected more than that. I really planned to do the entire trip in about 23 hours, for I thought I could make better time. However, I saw enough Highway Patrolmen giving out performance awards that I pretty well kept it at the speed limit.


I rode back to the Woodville Sheriff’s office to get my ending witness statements signed, then headed to the house where I had a cold beer and a warm bed waiting. Now I just have to gather all my receipts, and send in all the documents to the Iron Butt Association.


I really enjoyed this ride. This was the first time in over a year that I’ve had the chance to go riding just to ride. When I get on my bike I lose about 25 years and 50 lbs. and I have hair again. However, I don't think I'll ever be tough enough to duplicate Fluke189's report of a BBG 3000 a couple of weeks ago. If someone had told me that I still had to do another 1500 miles that day they would find out why my handle is Glockjock.:wrong:


Glen
 

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Congrats Glockjock. :thumbup:

I checked your Spot yesterday and noticed that you made it with a half hour or so to spare. My hat is of to you for doing it in the TORRID Tejas heat.:bow:


:thumbup:
 

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Congratulations Glen!

Glad things went well for you and you got home safely!:thumbup:

BBG is no simple task!
 

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Congrats!

I'm going to try a BBG next week, and it's not going to be easy... so, I can appreciate what you've accomplished!
 

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Congrats on a job well done and accomplished within the time limit...

Enjoy your down time now....
 

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Congrats!!!:thumbup:
 

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Congrats. A truly impressive ride.
Very good after action report as well.
Thanks for sharing.
 

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Planned well and executed well.

Congratulations.
 

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Glen:

Can you recommend a dealer/site for the cooling vest?

Thanks.
 

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Glad that you through Safe and Sound, Glen.
 

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...On a timed ride every minute counts. If the wheels aren’t rolling you’re losing time.


This phase-change technology isn't Bubba-approved, but it beats nothing. One of these days (if I can ever lose weight and get back to my fighting shape) I will get the proper LD Comfort and Moto-Port gear and do it right. In the meantime, the phase-change technology works for me because I always have my Tailwind trailer and an ice chest to keep the gel-packets charged....
Congrats on a tough ride. Next time just keep going until you hit Tucson, I'll ride the last part with you and there will be no need for the sheriffs office :).

The hassel factor and the short charge life long re-charge is the biggest problem with phase change. With your trailer most of the re-charge problems are taken care of but you still have the hassel and time lost changing 'packs" plus there is that period between the vest keeping you cool and not keeping you cool and stopping to change. If it is really hot and you push it you may overheat your core.

+1 on I-10 through West Texas.

I was through there a couple of weeks ago during the heat of the day with no problems, as I'm sure you know :), I wear only textile outer wear and a LDComfort helmet liner with the magic underwear and I soak liberally and early (went through almost two full bottles of H20 between fueling), usually starting by the mid 80s. It is easier to keep the core cool than it is to cool it off after over heating. BTW, they make LDComfort for fat boys, I'm proof :).
 

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Congrats on the ride. I remember the last 2 hours of the BBG being a tough fight to remain focused. Pulling this off in that kind of heat is impressive. Did a SS1000 attempt a week ago in high temps, which whipped my @ss.
 

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:bow:

Outstanding! Congratulations and thanks for the great writeup.

:yes1:
 

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Way to go Glen :congrats:

I just hope you had an extra set of keys along in case your boot got hungry....:joke:
 

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Congratulations Glen,

I am truly impressed.
Suzy and I just got back from Chattanooga last week. We took our time and were still worn out when we got home!

A very well written account too.

Jerry
 

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Great ride!

Impressive, Great job! Impressive :bow: :congrats:
 
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