GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well, I've finally began my winter service activities, and am putting Fred's DVD's to use. It took me two hours today to get to the air filter, 'course I'm taking my time, trying to do everything right the first time! I've had the dreaded anti-freeze smell when I first start the bike, so that is my main goal, trying to find all those fittings and get them tightened up. I've moved the bike, all the tools I think I may need, a TV set, DVD player, and a radio over to my mom's house, as she has a heated garage to work in, though a bit small, (only a 1 car), with a wheelchair ramp, but I figure that's still better than in my cold airy garage. I'm also taking lots of pictures to show all my riding buddies that say I'm CRAZY for this undertaking! Next out comes the fuel tank, and hopefully I'll find evidence of the coolant leak and get that fixed. I just hope this all goes back together, and is still rideable with no extra parts left over! Then I get to tell my wife, "See, I ain't some idiot, I CAN take something apart and put it back together! I may be on here askin' a few dumb questions when I get started puttin' her back together, hope ya'll don't mind:oops:!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
273 Posts
Go for it *******!
It was intimating for the first time, but it really is easier than it looked.
I chased the smell of antifreeze for a long time and found that if I used a SMALL pressure/vacuum hand pump attached to the overflow of the right radiator. It has a guage, so I pressurized the system to 10 psi and waited. After about an hour of waiting and watching I was able to find the seepage. If you intend to remove the fuel tank, I hope it was low on fuel. Like in the video, adding oil to the side will help it slip out.
Yes, the first time I removed the tank, I did find some loose clamps there too.
Good luck, don't forget the release cable on the right side pocket.
Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Go for it *******!
It was intimating for the first time, but it really is easier than it looked.
I chased the smell of antifreeze for a long time and found that if I used a SMALL pressure/vacuum hand pump attached to the overflow of the right radiator. It has a guage, so I pressurized the system to 10 psi and waited. After about an hour of waiting and watching I was able to find the seepage. If you intend to remove the fuel tank, I hope it was low on fuel. Like in the video, adding oil to the side will help it slip out.
Yes, the first time I removed the tank, I did find some loose clamps there too.
Good luck, don't forget the release cable on the right side pocket.
Bob
Where does one get these vacuum/pressure hand pumps, does an auto parts store have them. Got me a can of spray silicone for fuel tank removal, hopefully that goes well today! Planning on siphoning all the gas I can before removal. Also, when I start re-assembly, should I put anything on the electrical plugs and connections I've taken apart? I've seen talk on here before of the di-electric, (sp) grease, where to get it if I need to use it? Is it a spray? I've never used it and know nothing about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
928 Posts
*******,
You can get the pumps at most auto parts places or Harbor Freight, you can also get the di-electric grease at most auto parts stores and/or Radio Shack. It is expensive so make sure you take your blood pressure pills before you buy it. Nice part is it will last a long time, a little dab is all you need. Good on ya for using the Fred technique, as soon as it warms a bit here in the cold North going to be doing the same as you. Wrench and Ride Safe.

Crabby Bob :congrats:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I am also planning on doing a lot of the same. Just ordered all fluids, filters and brake pads from our sponsor. I have Freds dvds as well. Who wants anybody else touching their baby? I don't. You plan on taking all the time you need and you don't get paid by the job for a living. Good luck.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
22,070 Posts
Also, when I start re-assembly, should I put anything on the electrical plugs and connections I've taken apart? I've seen talk on here before of the di-electric, (sp) grease, where to get it if I need to use it? Is it a spray? I've never used it and know nothing about it.
DO NOT put dielectric grease on electrical contacts or inside connectors. It will cause you MUCH GRIEF. I would suggest that you just try to keep the connectors clean and put them back together dry, and make sure they get put back in the rubber boots they came out of. The most I would do is maybe wipe off any dust or dirt from the outside of them, being careful not to get it into the connector, and put them back together. I wouldn't even blow them out with compressed air, cause this can force moisture from your air compressor tank into them which will cause corrosion.

Dielectric grease is by nature an insulator, and it will PREVENT electrical contacts from working if it gets inbetween the contacts. It is meant to be used in places where you want to keep out moisture and/or prevent corrosion, but it should NOT be put on the contacts themselves.

I would NOT suggest putting it on any of the electrical connectors on the bike. The only places I use it are on moving parts of switches (like the reverse switch) to keep out moisture and keep them lubed, and in spark plug boots to make them easier to remove next time. I also would suggest using it sparingly when you do. It does work good on rubber components that need some lubrication or protection, and forms a barrier to prevent water intrusion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks a heap Fred, and everyone else for the assistance and opinions. I think I'll just bypass the grease, as I was having absolutely no problems with the bike except for the coolant smell, and guess what, after removing all this stuff, I still hadn't found any evidence of coolant anywhere, so I removed the front lower cowl, still couldn't see any. I then removed the lower side cowls (?), that cover the exhaust headers, and YEE HAW, there it was on the right side, behind the brake pedal and ex. header. Of course I had removed the left one first! I've got other stuff I have to do today, (gotta keep a happy wife!), so back to it later. If I decide to pressure test the system before I put it back together, how long and at what pressure should I keep it on at? On a funny note, I went to the Honda place on my way home to get an air filter, (they charged me 21.89 for it:eek:4:), and the knowledgable guy behind the counter says, "lets see, is that 12 or 1500 CC's", this after I told him it's for an '04 model! He even asked me who's gonna put it in for me. After I told him I am, he says you'll change your mind when you read the book and see what all you gotta take off just to get to it. I asked him, "Do ya want to see the old one? It's out in the truck!" He just said "good luck". Makes me wander if they've ever heard of Fred:bow:! Even though 98% of this didn't have to be done, I'm having a blast. I can't wait 'till someone I know needs help with their's. I'm gonna look like a genius:wrong:!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
I followed Fred's dvds also and they are worth it. My only complaint is at -30 bare feet is not very comfortable!!! :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I followed Fred's dvds also and they are worth it. My only complaint is at -30 bare feet is not very comfortable!!! :lol:
I gotta admit, I haven't watched all the DVDs yet, only the ones pertaining to whatever I'm working on at the time, but I've been lucky enough to have only seen those "knarley" toes one time so far:eek:4:! I've heard a lot about 'em, just ain't seen 'em much yet:eek:!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,254 Posts
Even a ******* can do it
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top