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This is just my thoughts i don't like the way the trike steers and it is raked.I guess i'm just use to 2 wheels
It took me about 1000 miles to stop my very well trained 2 wheel brain from screaming at me "this is all wrong". It was amazingly difficult, although it only took 50 miles, to stop wanting to put my feet down at stops. Long embedded instinct trumped knowledge.

Do I miss the supreme feel of swooshing around a turn, leaned over? Sure. But I wouldn't trade that for the freedom from worry when a bit of sand or water appears on the road. And the ability to do slow speed maneuvering effortlessly. To pull onto a beat up dirt shoulder, or go through a nasty unpaved construction zone, without fear. Not having to hold the darn thing up at stops is a bonus.

On a 900 pound long distance touring bike, an extra wheel may be the hot setup. :)
 

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2011 tri glide

My Brother in law purchased a 2011 Tri Glide in Janurary. I have riden it several times and I agree it is like riding an ATV. You have to fight the steering at low and high speeds. The thing just wears you out. We went to Harley to see if they could rake the front end and I was surprised to fing out it was already raked. He is now looking to also purchase a 2012 Goldwing so we can go on extended trips. I was thing about triking my Goldwing but purchased a Mini Cooper Convert. instead.

Art
 

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My Brother in law purchased a 2011 Tri Glide in Janurary. I have riden it several times and I agree it is like riding an ATV. You have to fight the steering at low and high speeds. The thing just wears you out. We went to Harley to see if they could rake the front end and I was surprised to fing out it was already raked. He is now looking to also purchase a 2012 Goldwing so we can go on extended trips. I was thing about triking my Goldwing but purchased a Mini Cooper Convert. instead.

Art
Glade i'm not the only one that's not to fond of trikes but for the ones that have them i'm glade you like them and that includes the better half she love's hers.
 

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It took me about 1000 miles to stop my very well trained 2 wheel brain from screaming at me "this is all wrong". It was amazingly difficult, although it only took 50 miles, to stop wanting to put my feet down at stops. Long embedded instinct trumped knowledge.

Do I miss the supreme feel of swooshing around a turn, leaned over? Sure. But I wouldn't trade that for the freedom from worry when a bit of sand or water appears on the road. And the ability to do slow speed maneuvering effortlessly. To pull onto a beat up dirt shoulder, or go through a nasty unpaved construction zone, without fear. Not having to hold the darn thing up at stops is a bonus.

On a 900 pound long distance touring bike, an extra wheel may be the hot setup. :)
Be very careful riding a trike through standing water at speed. Most have much wider tires than they need/should have and are prone to hydroplaning.
 

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Be very careful riding a trike through standing water at speed. Most have much wider tires than they need/should have and are prone to hydroplaning.
Most? How about all. I presume it's a styling thing, people wouldn't buy a trike with appropriately sized wheels/tires. These 175/65-15 would have plenty of load capacity, are well rated for resistance to hydroplaning, and would save substantial unsprung weight, improving the ride and handling. You'd have to put more than 20 psi in them, and the trike manufacturer would have to spec gear ratio appropriately.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires...wall=Blackwall&partnum=765HR5AMAXHP&tab=Sizes

I used the word bit of water deliberately. I was thinking of the usual situation out in the arid West, or snowmelt running across the road. I left most of the downpours behind when I moved out here from the East coast.
 

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We agree. Tires with considerably less cross-section width would be better/safer. Hannigan got caught up less in the 'wider is better' hype than others. Mist currently available passenger car tires have more than adequate load capacity. Without looking, I would bet nickel that I could find good narrower tires very close to the diameter of some of the tires being mounted on conversion trikes.

Most? How about all. I presume it's a styling thing, people wouldn't buy a trike with appropriately sized wheels/tires. These 175/65-15 would have plenty of load capacity, are well rated for resistance to hydroplaning, and would save substantial unsprung weight, improving the ride and handling. You'd have to put more than 20 psi in them, and the trike manufacturer would have to spec gear ratio appropriately.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires...wall=Blackwall&partnum=765HR5AMAXHP&tab=Sizes

I used the word bit of water deliberately. I was thinking of the usual situation out in the arid West, or snowmelt running across the road. I left most of the downpours behind when I moved out here from the East coast.
 

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Be very careful riding a trike through standing water at speed. Most have much wider tires than they need/should have and are prone to hydroplaning.
Big time!! I learned real quick to slow down in the rain and watch very carefully for the standing water and running water across a road. Wide tires look good but can be trouble in the rain on these light machines. Here's my DFT before the body install; you can get a good view of the wide 225/50R17's.
 

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Without looking, I would bet nickel that I could find good narrower tires very close to the diameter of some of the tires being mounted on conversion trikes.
It's harder than you think, if you stick to passenger car tires. I had to look hard before coming up with the example I used above of a suitable 175, and it's smaller in diameter than any stock trike tire I know, requiring a change in gearing. I went with the 205/60-16 recommended by DFT, because I was unwilling to accept the gearing of a smaller section width tire.

Go to the website I listed and click the specs tab. Look at the diameter column. You'll see the problem. Hannigan is indeed better than most, using a 185 section. It would be hard to go any smaller, you'd limit the choice of tire.
 
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