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Discussion Starter #1
I have been researching threads and accessories looking for the most effective approach to reducing the cold air passing over my hands when I ride. I previously rode a VTX 1300 and the only parts of my body that would get cold were the fingers and hands. Have not found any gloves that are suitable.

I prefer to avoid having to use heated gloves, etc, so am looking for suggestions to try that might help solve my cold hands problem (only while riding my motorcycle tho'). :roll:

If any of you have time to share your experience, please do so. Photos would be very helpful to my understanding of what the ideas look like and how they have to be installed.

Thanks so very much. :)

Todd
 

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Todd,

I went through this for years and years. My hands just don't generate the heat needed no matter how much I insulate.

Got electric gloves several years ago and I don't know how I ever did without them in the colder months.

I know you said you'd rather avoid them, but you should really consider them. Easy to use and make a world of difference. If you're like me anything else you try will be mediocre at best.

Best Regards,
Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Chris, thanks for the suggestions. :D I guess I may have to readjust my thinking. Is the installation of the wiring to use the gloves difficult? I am very non-electrical experienced. Because I want to hook up my gps and some audio headset things, I need to be sure to understand how to do the wiring, receptacles, etc, so I can use all items at the same time.

Really would like to try and do the setup myself and save some bucks, but am not understanding of how to do so. :roll: :oops: Things like relays, 12 volt receptacles, fuse blocks, appropriate size fuses, inline fuses, where to hook it up, impact on wiring system,etc, etc. all seem very confusing. I am willing to read and learn but don't know where/how to begin. :? :? :?

Todd
 

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Todd,

Just come on over one day and we can talk about all this...OHHHHHHH NOOOOOO...I can't talk to you...you use Mobil 1...lol...just kidding...
 

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Beside wind deflectors, there are heated grips and of course the heated gloves. I have tried most of them, and would suggest that the easiest and quickest is the heated grips. Hondas are expensive, but work. You also can use aftermarket, or even adapt ones for ATVs and snowmobiles. Gerbing make a lightweight G3 electric glove, but then you have to put them on, plug them in, etc. They are great if you are hard core about riding in the cool.
 

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cold fingers

Todd when I ride in cold weather (below 35) my fingers also get cold and I too won't go the heated glove route. If I am riding more than 10-15 miles I will often slip the skier's hand warmers in my gloves. I have picked them up by the case at Costco but I'm sure you can find them in a ton of places. They usually last as long as I'm ever going t be out on a winter day (4-5 hours) and I find them more comfy than mittens (my 2nd best solution)
 

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wvnnva said:
Chris, thanks for the suggestions. :D I guess I may have to readjust my thinking. Is the installation of the wiring to use the gloves difficult? I am very non-electrical experienced. Because I want to hook up my gps and some audio headset things, I need to be sure to understand how to do the wiring, receptacles, etc, so I can use all items at the same time.

Really would like to try and do the setup myself and save some bucks, but am not understanding of how to do so. :roll: :oops: Things like relays, 12 volt receptacles, fuse blocks, appropriate size fuses, inline fuses, where to hook it up, impact on wiring system,etc, etc. all seem very confusing. I am willing to read and learn but don't know where/how to begin. :? :? :?

Todd
My current set up is easy as it gets. The connector came with it's own inline fuse and goes to the battery. I have a pigtail that sneaks out between the battery side panel and the seat - look closely in my signature picture and you'll see the wire. I stuff it under the side panel during the summer and let it dangle during the winter - actually I stick it under the side flaps of the seat so it doesnt' really dangle.

My gloves temp control clips onto my belt or the bottom of my jacket and the two plug together. Thats' it. Installation was just attaching the connector to the battery.
 

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Todd:
I've not tried these yet but have been considering it for some time. Hand protectors can be purchased for ATV's that just clip around the ends of the handle bars covering the brake-clutch resorvior, levers and grips. Kind of creates a funnel around your hands. The one's I've seen are very large so you may have to cut them down to a more suitable size but I'm sure they would keep your hands out of the wind and therefor warm. Sorry couldn't find any pics.
 

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I use "Hot Grips" http://www.hotgrips.com/ which have served me well. I thought about electric gloves, but didn't want the hassle with the wires, although I do have the Gerbing electric jacket liner. The Gerbing liner is wired with plug ends at the end of the sleeves so the gloves would just plug in there. My wife has the whole Gerbing suite, Jacket, pants, gloves, and socks. http://www.gerbing.com/

When I researched this for myself, I tried to find riders who have used both (heated grips or gloves). I found riders who went from gloves to the grips, but not the opposite. For me, I figured that there might be times when I left the gloves at home not thinking I would need them and get caught in the cold. But with heated grips, they are always there. I also use winter gloves sold by Hot Grips, that have thinner insulation in the palm, and thicker insulation on the back of the hand & backside of the fingers.

Of course, you could install both. The gloves probably do provide more even overall heat, especially to the back of the hand
 

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Latex Gloves

Here is a trick that I've used for years. I keep several pairs of latex gloves on all my bikes (Use to have to get them from hospitals but now you can get them at home depot to wear when working on the bike). If you slip these on, then a pair of gloves, it doesnt' matter how thin the gloves are, you hands will stay warm. This is especially helpful in a rain storm. I ride here in Texas and thus mostly have light weight summer gloves. Made the mistake of thinking that the weather on the Parkway would be nice in May. It was raining and 40 degrees and me with only light weight gloves in the trunk. But the latex gloves did the trick, rest of me was cold as all get out but the hands were warm!
 

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Re: Latex Gloves

bnickle said:
Here is a trick that I've used for years. I keep several pairs of latex gloves on all my bikes (Use to have to get them from hospitals but now you can get them at home depot to wear when working on the bike). If you slip these on, then a pair of gloves, it doesnt' matter how thin the gloves are, you hands will stay warm. This is especially helpful in a rain storm. I ride here in Texas and thus mostly have light weight summer gloves. Made the mistake of thinking that the weather on the Parkway would be nice in May. It was raining and 40 degrees and me with only light weight gloves in the trunk. But the latex gloves did the trick, rest of me was cold as all get out but the hands were warm!
Actually, latex gloves make my hands sweat. I use silk glove liners... like you can get a ski shops or sporting goods stores. Love 'em.

.
 

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FINGERS AND HANDS GET COLD--REMEDY

If you don't want to resort to heated gloves, you may want to give some thought to getting a pair of gloves that I just purchased--If you have a Tractor Supply Co in your area, go look at the Berne Waterproof glove which is a GLV32--It is black, textile with thinsulate and is completely waterproof and has a very large gauntlet which will fit over your jacket sleeve with no problem--another rider put me on to this and it is by far the best, warmest, dryest glove I have ever had--the cost is almost unbelievable-Since I don't have any Tractor Supplys around I had to order-cost of the glove was a whopping 11.13 but the shipping was 13.00!! Still a great purchase-Can't buy direct from Berne but you can see on line at www.berneapparel.com--if interested, and if no Tractor Supply close, I will tell you where you can order [email protected]
 

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Here is an old solution that someone seems to still be making, "Hippo Hands". I believe it was Craig Vetter that invented these back in the 70's.

You can still get a form of them at:

http://www.hippohands.com/



 

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Hippo Hands do work, we used them on our police bikes and I have used them with prior bikes. Hands remain dry and only need to wear light weight gloves with them. The main problem with them is bulk for storing. If you will need them for the entire ride, good. But a lot times I find myself in and out of cold or warmer weather and would like to remove them at times.
 

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I've had the regular Gerbing heated glove (Classic) for a couple of years, but really didn't like wearing them (unlike my other Gerbing gear, which I enjoy ) unless it got really cold and/or rainy since they were a real effort to put on and deal with plus the wires. Last night I picked up a set of the new Gerbing G3 gloves and it's easy to see (IMO) that Gerbing really got the glove right with this new model. It's much much more user friendly, slimmer profile, and easy to deal with heated glove than their Classic model. I'm going to enjoy wearing these new gloves since are far easier to put on and take off when they are needed, less balky, plus they are waterproof like the other Gerbing glove.

I still might install a heated grip since there isn't too many more things to get anyway, but there are certainly times where a heated glove was the only way to be comfortable on my rides.

DaleC
 

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Todd, You get a lot of opinions and here's mine. I live and ride in Montana and travel into Canada and Alaska. I use the electrical connection heated grips (www.electricalconnections.com) and snowmobile gloves for really bad days. The electrical grips were easy to install and work well. Most of the time with thin riding gloves the low setting is adequate. Below 30 degrees I do like the snowmobile gloves with the large cuffs, more for the air control on my forearms than for my fingers and hands.

happy and warm riding, Jim
 

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OK, Paul, what part of sunny CA was this? (and there sure is something in a name...... :lol: :lol: )
 

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Baker mirror wings, insulated leather gloves and silk glove liners work for me. Of course, I don't ride in anything colder than about 35 degrees.
 

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If you are now riding a Wing and don't already have them, start with the Baker Built mirror mounted hand wings.

Till I rode my new bike, without the hand wings I had forgotten just how much cold air passes under those mirrors onto the hands. Anything else you do will be much less effective without those hand wings.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
FIrst, I want to apologize for not acknowledging the replies of all of you who shared your ideas. I am embarassed for allowing it to slip by me. :oops: :oops: :oops:

Not, THANKS THANKS and THANKS to each of you for your wonderful suggestions. I have not finalized what I want to do yet, but the weather has changed and my hands are talking to me. Ouch :roll: For example, today I rode 90 miles and the temp wasn't too bad, in the low 50's. However, I was using some thermal gloves I ordered from ProLine and the hands got a bit cold. Once it gets colder I WILL have to use better protection. :roll:

I am going to go ahead and order the mirror wings tho'. I like the shape of the Tulsa brand, but like the Baker versatility for cold or warm weather. This one may require flipping of the old coin to decide.

Again, thanks so much for all the great posts. :D

Todd
 
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