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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Going from Atlanta to Birmingham on I-20 for MotoAmerica last weekend. Had the wife on the back with as much luggage as a Wing can hold. Speed limit is 70, traffic is running 80, and I like to run a bit above traffic.
When I pull off the exit for Barber, I feel that horrible wiggle that says "you have a flat". There was absolutely no indication that there was a problem until I got down under 10mph. The tire was so hot it was about to melt.
I pulled into the gas station across the street only to discover my valve stem was broke off. How did this happen just going down the road? So now I am in a pickle.

We hop back on the bike and make the super slow 2 mile trip to the track, where I explain to the lady at the gate that I need to get to the pits where I can get some buddies to help. She says I can go in, but not the bike. Huh? Do you understand I have a flat tire and need to go in get it fixed? Yes sir, you can go in, but not the bike.

I did not have the wrench for the axle, so I go in, take the tram to the pit, borrow a wrench, take the tram back to the bike, pull the wheel off, tram back to the pit. Dunlop race services was incredible. Popped the tire off and installed a super high-zoot chrome racing valve stem, put the tire back on, and balanced it to a gnats-arse. It was a bit of a pain for them, as they are set up for 17" wheels, but they made it work. Good thing the tire was "good enough" to get me home, as there was not an 18" tire within miles. So now I tram back to the bike, put the wheel back on, tram back to the pit to return tools, and tram back to the bike.

What did I learn? I'm not sure. I will carry a wrench for the axle from now on, but that wouldn't help in most situations, although it would have in this one. I suppose I learned that I will not use rubber valve stems again.
I also learned that a flat front, as was the flat rear I had years ago, is not noticeable in a straight line at speed.
If my exit had been a turn, things may have been a lot worse.
 

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Quite an experience. Thanks for sharing. I think you should send a can of SPAM to the security Lady at the gate!:wink2:


I'm sure it could have been possible to get you a pass.


Corventure Dave
 

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Does your bike have a TPMS on it? If not that would be another lesson learned :wink2:

Glad that you both came away without being hurt and you were able to get the problem resolved.
 
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What year & how many miles on the wing? Are they OEM valve stems? If so the OEM valve stems are notorious for breaking at the rubber most Wing riders have replaced them with the metal ones like the ones the racers used on yours, front & rear!! RIDE SAFE!!!!
 

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On a motorcycle show early this year I bought Sykik TPMS for my bike and now I can keep an eye on my tire pressure while riding (and before ride, of course).

Easy installation, simple product, nothing fancy but does the job well so far. They are available online, around $50-$60 price range. There are better ones but this one does the job for me.


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On a motorcycle show early this year I bought Sykik TPMS for my bike and now I can keep an eye on my tire pressure while riding (and before ride, of course).

Easy installation, simple product, nothing fancy but does the job well so far. They are available online, around $50-$60 price range. There are better ones but this one does the job for me.


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Interesting. Where did you mount the monitor?
Thanks
 

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Interesting. Where did you mount the monitor?

Thanks
On my Helibars. The guy who sold me the unit said a lot of riders would stick a velcro on the back of it and mount it that way.

You charge that unit with a regular mini usb charger (like for older Android phone). But it keeps it's charge for a long time...

....and I just noticed my tires are low haha...Let me pump them up.


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I use FOBO's TPMS on my '14 Valkyrie. This is the first version, which works fine and simply Bluetooths to my phone, which is already on the handlebar for GPS use. Doesn't require a separate monitor to clutter things up. It does, however, recommend they by used with metal stems as the forces of the tire's RPMs can bend a rubber one. Or break an older rubber one. They, FOBO, now have a version 2.0, apparently, that uses a smaller (less diameter and less mass) sensor on each stem to help prevent the type of damage I've described. Wish I'd had these things decades ago!
 

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I use FOBO's TPMS on my '14 Valkyrie. This is the first version, which works fine and simply Bluetooths to my phone, which is already on the handlebar for GPS use. Doesn't require a separate monitor to clutter things up. It does, however, recommend they by used with metal stems as the forces of the tire's RPMs can bend a rubber one. Or break an older rubber one. They, FOBO, now have a version 2.0, apparently, that uses a smaller (less diameter and less mass) sensor on each stem to help prevent the type of damage I've described. Wish I'd had these things decades ago!
I installed 'T' valve stems on mine, so already plumbed for TPMS. I would not run those 'L' shaped, rubber valve stems on anything. They were on the bike when I first bought it, and among the first things to get canned.
 

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I installed 'T' valve stems on mine, so already plumbed for TPMS. I would not run those 'L' shaped, rubber valve stems on anything. They were on the bike when I first bought it, and among the first things to get canned.
That is the way to go. With straight-up stems, metal or not, if the sensor says you are a few PSI low, you have to take off the sensor to fill it up. Not convenient.
 

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On a motorcycle show early this year I bought Sykik TPMS for my bike and now I can keep an eye on my tire pressure while riding (and before ride, of course).

Easy installation, simple product, nothing fancy but does the job well so far. They are available online, around $50-$60 price range. There are better ones but this one does the job for me.


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I checked their web site, they didn't say anything about adding extra sensors, like for my trailer. Can you?
 
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I checked their web site, they didn't say anything about adding extra sensors, like for my trailer. Can you?
Hmmmm......I didn't ask when I was buying it since I didn't need it. Based on the look of the screen I would say that you can't add any extras since it shows only front and rear sensor reading.

I believe they do have units for cars (4 sensors)....but I'm not sure would that work for the bike (front+rear) plus trailer (side-by-side wheels).



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Discussion Starter #16

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My opinion TPMS are nice when they work properly but just read the board there are waaaaay to many failures, so far no TPMS system on any vehicle I own.
 

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I get my tires changed at Cycle Gear. Within the last two years they have implemented a policy wherein they change the valve stem every time, no questions asked, no refusal.
In theory, good idea. In practice, I think they got a bad batch, because I had two (maybe three) in a short period (on different bikes) that didn't leak "before" but steadily lost pressure "after" tire change (yeah, I have four bikes, so I go through some tires).

As an aside, my 08 GL1800 had the same thing--tire pressure held fine in the garage and pressure was fine on preflight, but 90 degree valve stem on front tire was apparently tired, and centrifugal force caused it to flex that little bit, opening a split on the freeway. Happened over the course of a 70-mile ride (35 out, 35 back).

Unlike yours, I was aware of it, because the front end/steering started feeling "heavier" on the return trip. I suspected I knew what was going on, slowed down, it continued to get worse, so l pulled over, pressed on the front tire, and I could feel some give. Best guess is it was down to 20 psi or so. I found a gas station with air (increasingly rare these days), pumped it waaaaay up (got all of my 50 cents worth LOL) and rode home slowly.

Then started having trouble with the Cycle Gear stems. Man, the GL steers like a wheelbarrow full of wet mud with low pressure in the front tire. :)
 

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Valve stems need to be replaced with every tire change.:smile2:
I do not agree with you here at all.

Maybe I'd agree with you if have angled rubber valves without support but I you shouldn't run those anyway.

A straight rubber valve should last 5 years pretty easily and metal valve stems will last 100K miles.
 
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