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Left for Panama City Florida on Tuesday for a job interview and I-10 was littered with road gators and I prayed not to have an encounter with a piece of tire in my travels.
My return trip Wednesday to St. Augustine on I-10 a small piece of tire that was in the road was sent flying in my direction, over the windshield of the Wing and into the lane to my right.
I can also add I didn't get the job.
Watch for the flying ones in your travels. :22yikes:
 

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"firestoning aftermath"

I wish there was a real and provable limit to the number of times a truck tire becomes a retread. Or, better yet, abolish them due to lack of such a limit. Those things do not require being flat to fling tread. I have been behind a rig in process of tossing large chunks. Not fun. When I got in front of it, it was not flat, just loosing the tread. Now, there was something I saw coming home from vacation that would really be an ugly one. One of the double wide non-dually tires dropped a tread. It was laying on the shoulder and partly on edge. Man, that thing was absolutely huge.

I tend to check out truck tires when I go by them. There have been several occasions that I see something not right or just an obvious flat. If I can get them on the CB, I tell them and they slow up a bit and hit the next exit to check it out. Catch a flat early enough and the tire has a chance to stay together. Actually, I have even noticed cars with flats doing 65+. It is a little harder to tell someone about a flat if all you have to communicate is a horn and index finger. That was "Index" finger as a certain other would be just wrong......
 

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Considering that retreads separating have killed a many people in both cages and on bikes, and maimed many more, and causes an untold number of accidents, they ought to be outlawed nationwide.

But the commercial trucking industry and tire manufacturers has some strong lobbyists that that help literally get away with putting those lethal weapons on our roads.

The sad part is, they are all too often not held accountable for the damage they cause to include the tons upon tons of carcasses they leave behind on americas roadways.

I appreciate truckers for what they do for america but some have horrible habits. (As do cages and bikers)
 

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Years ago I had an air brake shoe fly over the pickup truck I was driving. Saw it come out the rear of the 18 wheeler bouncing towards me. Lucky it missed.
Amazing how many rigs get DOT stickers with major violations. :eek:4:
 

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The sad part is, they are all too often not held accountable for the damage they cause to include the tons upon tons of carcasses they leave behind on americas roadways.
Talk to a trucker and they will tell you about the heavy road tax and fuel taxes they pay and how these moneys are urinated by politicians.

The bottom line is - long distance trucking is a waste of energy and a major polutants when compared to containerised rail freight. The US needs to do like Europe - more rail piggy back service and only short range trucking. But....Cat, Navistar, Peterbilt and the Teamsters will continue to have it their wasteful way.

Also...most tires that fail are from the trailer, not the tractor. Some trailers may sit out for 6 months in the sun before they are moved. Retreads don't take well to that. We use retreads in aviation and they do not delaminate like truck tires.

So...just continue to be on the lookout for shreaded truck tires on the road.
 

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Wouldn't it be nice if there was a way to make dissolving tires; i.e. they dissolve after they fall off the truck. Another nice idea would be to have robots going around picking these things up; however, they probably would never be able to keep up.
 

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Train rails do not run to every city, town, rural area, or business where products must be delivered. Without trucks how would products reach all those destinations?

The problem is much worse in some areas because lazy and overpaid state highway departments don't bother removing debris from their highways. The problem is not so much the occasional failed 18 wheel OTR truck tire, but the sheer numbers of trucks on the highways and the total miles they travel. If state highways are not cleaned up regularly, the problem gets out of hand.

It is not only 18 wheel OTR trucks which experience tire failures, an occasional car, privately owned cargo or flatbed trailer, (motorcycle trailer), boat trailer, and RV trailer also leave tire treads on the roadway.

I live along a rural but heavily traveled highway which is a major route between DFW and Lubbock. I see the tire carcasses almost every day. Local TXDOT offices send a light truck out every morning and a crew picks up the roadway debris.
 
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