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Still getting my ducks in a row for my first wing and have some questions on fog lights...

1. Looks like Honda now sells a different version than in past years, the current ones are LED: any experience with these, are they better or worse?

2. How are the fog lights switched on/off? I don't see any switches that come with the kit.

3. Most wings I see don't have them, any reason?
 

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Rando,

Glad to hear you are still in the market. I still say be like a Nike shoe and "just do it", but I'm very good at spending other people's money, so...

There are indeed 2 versions of the Hondaline fogs. Regular halogen is STILL available and probably will be forever, and the new LED technology. I haven't seen a pair myself, but I'll give you the heresay that they are indeed brighter than the halogen ones and have a whiter light and a better coverage. They are almost twice as expensive though. I am going to be getting a pair, because I think the LED color will more closely match the HID conversion I'm going to be undertaking this season.

The fog lights are on a relay and are operated by pushbutton switch. If you get the Hondaline fogs, which is what we're talking about, and you get a NIB (new in box) kit, then you will get an included pushbutton switch to put on your left console right under your hazard light pushbutton. It is the same construction as your hazard button, but it has a fog light icon on them. (Can a friendly Winger please post a picture?) You can turn them off altogether, or if you engage the button, they will come on until you have the high beams on I believe, where a relay will cut them out. Most places only LEGALLY allow you to have 4 forward facing driving/fog lights, which is the reason for the relay. I don't know if this relay is defeatable or not, I have done no research on the matter.

As far as why you won't see them on many wings is that they don't come as a factory option, and most people agree that the Hondaline ones are outrageously expensive (as are most Hondaline items) and there are much cheaper options like the Show Chrome, Kuryakyn, eBay special, or hand crafted options. Most of the time, people don't get them because they would rather spend the money on shiney parts. From personal experience, I haven't gotten them yet because I didn't have the money to and there were other upgrades that I felt were more useful. But now that I have a job again, they are near the top of the list, right behind the LED trunk and saddlebag trim lights and the HID conversion.

Hope this helps. Oh, and... GO GET THE WING.

:nojoke:ing around. :lol:
 

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I live near you and i do not really see the need for them. Granted they light up the road more but at 70 miles an hour your not going to see the deer any sooner. spend the money on something else
 

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I live near you and i do not really see the need for them. Granted they light up the road more but at 70 miles an hour your not going to see the deer any sooner. spend the money on something else

I don't think the primary use is for fog, but for the other guys to see you better.
 

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Still getting my ducks in a row for my first wing and have some questions on fog lights...

1. Looks like Honda now sells a different version than in past years, the current ones are LED: any experience with these, are they better or worse?

2. How are the fog lights switched on/off? I don't see any switches that come with the kit.

3. Most wings I see don't have them, any reason?
I had the LED ones installed when I purchased my bike. Along with a backrest and highway pegs.. have not regretted any of them.. will be heading to Corpus Christi from Houston on May 8th and heading back on the 9th.. looking forward to the run.. Those lights really are bright and people do see ya very well..

Tommy aka Fluffy
 

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They may call them "fog lights" but they are not. They are "running lights" and I have them to make me more visible to other drivers and riders.

I highly recommend them for that purpose. They do light up the road better when the low beams are on, but do nothing to help with FOG.

As for seeing deer better, nothing helps. Don't ride at dusk or dawn if you are afraid of deer stepping out in front of you.
 

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I had platinum series from electrical connections on my 03 and I'll get another set for my 08. They are great.
 

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I agree with the posters who recommend the driving lights. A bike with only one light (headlight) is one dimensional and difficult for other drivers to judge your distance. Adding the driving (fog) lights creates a light triangle, making it easier for others to see you and judge your distance. If you ever get out in the boondocks, such as a two lane blactop in middle of nowhere Georgia, you'll quickly learn how inadequate the headlights are. You'll think you've gone blind. I added the PIA 1100X driving lights for just such situations. You can see for miles ahead with those babies.
 

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I agree with the posters who recommend the driving lights. A bike with only one light (headlight) is one dimensional and difficult for other drivers to judge your distance. Adding the driving (fog) lights creates a light triangle, making it easier for others to see you and judge your distance. If you ever get out in the boondocks, such as a two lane blactop in middle of nowhere Georgia, you'll quickly learn how inadequate the headlights are. You'll think you've gone blind. I added the PIA 1100X driving lights for just such situations. You can see for miles ahead with those babies.

From some-one who lives in the "boondocks, two lane blacktop middle of Georgia" :lol: I can honestly say, You are exactly right "oldbiker Tom". :agree:I have them, and highly recommend everyone get them installed on you bike, the more lights you have the better some-one can see you!!!!
 

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I don't think the primary use is for fog, but for the other guys to see you better.
Copy That. Triangle lighting coming right at cha'
 

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Due to my work schedule I almost always wind up riding at night and in the early morning. You can never have too much light.

This is my homemade version of driving lights.

They are 55 watt halogens with a 6 inch reflector. I ran heavy wire from the lights to a switch then to relay that is turned off when i shut the bike off so i dont killl the battery. ( a lesson learned the hard way of course).

About $50 for the lights, wire fuses switch and relay.
 

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!st-Hand Exp Honda LED Fog / PIAA Aux Lamps

I have the Hondaline LED "fog" "running" lights. They are indeed whiter, brighter and wider coverage than the Hondaline quartz-halogen fog lights I had on 2 prior GL 1800 GWs.

A NIB kit as stated by another will come with a standard switch inserted into the left side filler panel, adjacently to the right of the 4-way flasher switch (on the '09 model-year) or (wherever - on prior model years). You simply pop out the filler panel at the switch hole and pop the new switch in.

The included relay will shut the fog lights off if-when you turn the stock high beam headlights on. If you want to be able to run both at the same time, Electrical Connections sells a "Big Bike Parts / Hondaline Fog Light Reconfiguration Harness" which includes its own relay and enables you to run fog lamps with high beams on.

I disagree with the poster who said no lights will help spot roadside deer, and agree with the poster who loves his PIAA Powersports 1100X 55-watt quartz-halogen auxiliary driving lights that purportedly per manufacturer have an output equivalent of 85 watts per bulb. (Fuse rating for this is 20 Amps).

If purchased NIB as the kit designed for GL1800, these PIAA lights mount on brackets inside the front fairing open tunnel, beneath the stock headlights, at the outer upper left-right end of the fairing tunnel, generally in line with and just outboard of the front fork tubes.

Others have their own differing Favs for auxiliary running lights, and I admittedly have no prior experience with any other running lights, but I am very pleased with my own PIAAs. Independently adjustable and aimable up-down, right-left, distinctly much whiter light than the stock OEM headlight low-high beams, and these suckers are brighter than the stock OEM HIGH beams are. In a kind of weird way. Not so intensely narrow-beam focused as the stock high beams are. Just broader in overall coverage, obviously aided by aiming, but just a more evenly-distributed curtain of light that extends as least as far as if not farther than the high beams, with an even light distribution from roadbed to treetops. Again, as an admitted Newbie to aux driving lights, I am nevertheless very impressed by the light output from such small, tiny lamps. The wiring harness for these came equipped with an encapsulated-vinyl-rubber on-off switch, with a well-insulated durable lead of enough length to attach to any convenient location of choice. Although black in color to the eye, the PIAA on-off switch has a little LED light that shines through the cover from underneath it - glows green when the aux lights are off, glows red when the aux lights are on, thus "intuitive", and the little LED makes it easy to see and find the switch at whatever location you mounted it (presumably in sight) when riding in dark/night.

New PIAA bulbs seem almost prohibitively expensive at vicinity of $40 @. Have a friend who says he found identical matching equivalent bulbs at some lamp supplier, that were designed for residential track lighting lamps . . . which home-light kits evidently must have their own transformer, because the bulbs were 55W, 12-volt. Friend said they work just fine and cost about $14 @. (Yeah, I've solicted useful-necessary "details" re this from the friend and will advise further upon receipt of his responsive reply).

I've been smacked right in the face by an airborne Bambi at 55 MPH, which is why I bought the PIAAs, and I'll simply say in conjunction with the way I've aimed mine, and the added ample illumination they provide for both roadway as well as shoulders of road, they do give me a tad more peace of mind when riding the rural-country highways.

Even if I can't find cheaper aftermarket bulbs, I won't care "too much". I'll only be using the aux lamps when needed for "wildlife country" so (hopefully) bulb-life longevity won't be too much of an issue. I'll put it this way - whole helluva lot smaller "issue" than what frickin' Bambi did to me, and cost me. OMG. I thought for a while there I was never ever even gonna "be the same" again. Time Heals. Walkin' "Miracle Man" is a Happy Camper indeed. I was touch & go, "lingering on the threshold", so WTF even if I gotta spring for $80 a pop for new bulb set, I don't care. Worth it to me, for this reason: I'll "round up" by 5 MPH to make the Math simpler:

60 MPH = 88 feet per second.
A lousy one-quarter second difference, sooner or later, re the split-second moment in time my path & Bambi's path intersected, would have equated to a separation distance of 22 feet, AKA as a Miss As Good As A Mile.

I do believe the PIAAs may increase my visual line-of-sight on roadway-shoulders-distance by a heckuva lot more than the equivalent of 22 feet distance and one-quarter-second travel-distance time at 60 MPH, and therein lies the greater sense of comfort, coupled with an enhanced ability for duly-diligent Lookout Ahead down the roadway in front of me. In other words, if it helps me spot a roadside Bambi even just one-quarter second sooner, then that buys me a greater safety margin of 22 feet at 60 MPH. Does that Make Sense to you? It makes Sense to me.

Have not yet had opportunity or roadway conditions to evaluate the effectiveness of the Hondaline LED fog lamps for actual "Fog Conditions" yet. Will post opinions on that after I encounter some real fog. Mounted low, they can't hurt is how I see it in general. I do think one bennie is running them all the time to make oneself more visible to the oncoming cagers will likely be better than with quartz-halogens bulbs due to the longer lifesapn of LEDs in general.

My only dissatisfaction with the Hondaline LED fog lamps is that despite certainty of "correct" install, they do not sit as "foward" into the front lower cowl opening as prior quartz lamps on prior GWs did, and there is a wider circumferential "gap" between outer rim of LED lamps and the holes in the lower cowl panel.

I'm thinking-hoping that installation of lens-protective foglamp covers might reduce that clearance gap space and imrpove "cosmetics" a little bit.

So I'd greatly appreciate any first-hand-user-experience comments or suggestions on the best covers to use for mounting over Hondaline LED fog lamps. I'd be interested in CLEAR covers, moreso than yellow ones, but will gladly consider anyone's thoughts and recommendations either way. Thanks in advance to any Repliers.
 

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Mcrider4eva5491 - do you EVER have a short reply?? I thought the women I date were long winded. ;):p
 

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So I'd greatly appreciate any first-hand-user-experience comments or suggestions on the best covers to use for mounting over Hondaline LED fog lamps. I'd be interested in CLEAR covers, moreso than yellow ones, but will gladly consider anyone's thoughts and recommendations either way. Thanks in advance to any Repliers.
I'm running the Hondaline fog lamp covers on my Hondaline LED lamps.

Installation requires removing the lower cowl and drilling 6 holes to mount the covers which is probably more involved than other covers.

They quickly, easily, and securely attach with 6 hex screws.

They provide execellent protection to the cowl lights and can quicly be removed for cleaning.



 

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I'm Running Showchrome/Big Bike Fog "blue" lights with Hondaline Covers to protect the light and PIAA 1100X driving lights. Also added the Electrical Connection relay for running the Fog lights with Hi or Low beams. The EC relay also takes the electrical load off the Fog Light On/Off switch.



I get very good coverage of the road and surroundings at night... very Noticeable during the day also!
 

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Mcrider4eva5491 - do you EVER have a short reply?? I thought the women I date were long winded. ;):p
Glad we're not dating, LOL. I'm trying to share info that others might find informative or helpful. If you don't find it as such, I'd think it easy enough for you to just scroll on by to the next post in the thread.

The board has a per-post limit. So I presume said limit is what the powers that be consider Acceptable. Apologies if my info-sharing is too offensive to anyone.

But I do think that might be preferable to posting a post, as I often see here, that only generates a gazillion inquiries re unanswered questions prompted by the post itself.

Guess I'll try to keep more Brevity in mind.
Thanks for the admonishment, I ain't above accepting constructive criticism if-when that's what it is. Have a nice day.
 

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Low instead of High

My '04 had the Electrical Connection Basic series on it since 2005 it seems. They are only on with HIGH beam. I would prefer they are on during Low beam. Anyone know how to change them to be on with LOW BEAM, NOT HIGH Beam?
 

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My '04 had the Electrical Connection Basic series on it since 2005 it seems. They are only on with HIGH beam. I would prefer they are on during Low beam. Anyone know how to change them to be on with LOW BEAM, NOT HIGH Beam?

This link is to the fog lights from Big Bike Parts. Click on the installation instructions. Half way through the instructions it talks about a jumper to use to keep the lights on. http://www.bigbikeparts.com/Inventory/Navision/52-604?catalogNo=
 
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