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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
That would be me. I'm still learning.

80 ft. lbs. of torque for the rear wheel. What is/are the effects if someone tightens those lug nuts too much ??

Thanks,

# 2
 

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That would be me. I'm still learning.

80 ft. lbs. of torque for the rear wheel. What is/are the effects if someone tightens those lug nuts too much ??

Thanks,

# 2
That depends on how much is too much. If you put 90 ft-lbs on them nothing will happen. If you put 500 ft-lbs on them, the lugs will either stretch out, strip or break off. The same is true on the other end. If you put 70 ft-lbs on the lug nuts no one will ever know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That depends on how much is too much. If you put 90 ft-lbs on them nothing will happen. If you put 500 ft-lbs on them, the lugs will either stretch out, strip or break off. The same is true on the other end. If you put 70 ft-lbs on the lug nuts no one will ever know.

Thank you. I kind of expected something like what you've said. Life's experience has shown me that theer is NO WAY some mechanics are torquing the nuts properly. My own expereinces..........
11- 12 bikes..... 1/2 million miles or so...........over 31 years on a bike................. I HAVE NEVER had a mechanic outside of a dealership ask me what the torque values were for ANY bike I've ever owned. There is NO WAY in heck ( couldn't say the 'H' word....MODS ) they either looked it up or just happened to know the correct values. No way.

And, I could be wrong, but I doubt it, I don't believe ALL dealership mechanics are doing ti properly either.

As an aside to this post, I have not done any work on any of my previous bikes except for oil changes, plugs, filters. Easy enough. Now that I know A BIT more and am doing my own work except for 'crazy' stuff that is over my abilities/tools/ etc., it literally scares me when I think of how much can go wrong ( $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ ) if not done properly.

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Ah, but you forget the many folks on this forum who say they've been DIY wrenching for years and have finely honed, sufficiently accurate torquing by feel alone. I would guess many professional technicians would say the same - that they have sufficient practical experience to know by feel the correct torque for various bolt sizes.

Tim
 

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Known some excellent mechanics over the years. Only time I ever saw one of them use a tq wrench was internal block assembly; rod bearings, crank bearings, etc. As one of them told me one time, "A good mechanic don't need no da-- tq wrench."
Just saying . . .
 

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I set my compressor's air to 80psi and hammer it on with impact driver...not really.

I "guess" the correct torque value and call it good. I do use the impact driver though.
 

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I have torque wrenches, 1/2”,3/8”,1/4” drives. Dial, click, bar. I feel that bikes/ airplanes/ submarines/ spaceships/ and such deserve the requested value listed in a shop manual when performing service or repair. Having done so much car work in another life makes me slack off some on car service. I would still torque internal components as requested, but most external items get the ‘feels good’ setting. Oh, did I say that cars suck??? After all those years tormenting my spirit. I just want to get it back on the road. I put an engine in the wife’s Camry in the morning, and took off on the bike by 3ish and made it to dinner with the guys down at the old Davis Rally in New Hampton Iowa. I had to go get the engine in Isanti that morning. I was at the door waiting at 8am when they opened. Not a torque wrench in site for that job. The misses tried to help, but just kept saying, ”how do you know where anything goes, its all just laying in piles on the floor“. I should have thought of the “hold my beer and watch this”. LOL.
 

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I am a retired car dealer and technician and have seen first hand poor dangerous repairs. Have never had any of my 50+ bikes back to a dealer or bike shop. A few times to change the tires after I removed the wheels from the bike. There are good bike techs, but there are a lot of hacks. I do all my own work because I know the correct quality parts are used, and everything is done right with everything torqued to spec. I have brought new bikes home and had to correct techinician screw ups when they did the pre delivery inspection. If a tech screws up your car, you just break down. When he/she screws up your bike you could end up in the hospital, or worse yet a coffin. So get a manual, buy the tools, get a bike lift, and do it yourself. The members here will be happy to help. It is very rewarding and much safer to do your own repairs and maintenance.
 

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I ( can do approx 65%) of the repairs, BUT if special tools are required, to do a job, that I'll only need once to do, in a bike's lifetime, I won't go out and purchase that expensive tool only to have it sitting there in my tool box, never too be used again......................

Ronnie
 

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I'm thinking 80# on a lug nut is some sort of standard. There was a time that I pretty well knew the standard torque values for fasteners up over an inch at maybe three hardness grades. That may be why some mechanics don't refer to a manual every single time they need to torque a fastener. I do own several torque wrenches and I do make use of them but these days I mostly worry with the inch pound values so as to not strip out a fragile 6 or 8 mm going into aluminum.
 

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I have always wondered: Do torque wrenches ever need recalibrating? And if so, how many people have ever had them (re)calibrated? Were they correct to begin with? How does anyone know? Should we just take Harbor Freight's or Sears's word for it that a torque wrench is accurate? I would take Snap-On's word that a torque wrench was at close to correct when new, but will it stay that way over time? I have a couple of torque wrenches that are over 50 years old. Just because they read that a nut's been torqued to 50lbs doesn't mean that that nut is accurately torqued anywhere near 50lbs.(I also have a nuts that are over 50 years old, but that's different.)
 

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I have always wondered: Do torque wrenches ever need recalibrating? And if so, how many people have ever had their torque wrenches (re)calibrated since they bought them? Were they correct to begin with? How does anyone know? Should we just take Harbor Freight's or Sears's word for it that a torque wrench is accurate? I would take Snap-On's word that a torque wrench was at close to correct when new, but will it stay that way over time? I have a couple of torque wrenches that are over 50 years old. Just because they read that a nut's been torqued to 50lbs doesn't mean that that nut is accurately torqued anywhere near 50lbs.(I also have a nuts that are over 50 years old, but that's different.)
There are places that will check them.
 

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There are places that will check them.
Good to know. What I'm wondering is, How many people here ever have had it done? Millions of us have used torque wrenches blithely believing that we're putting our engines together correctly. Most of us assume these wrenches read close to correctly, but I wonder if many of them don't.
 

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We went to a q&a session with the top BMW tech for the whole Southeast. This was about 2006. He said for BMWs, only use SnapOn torque wrenches and if it is cold out, warm them in the oven until they are 70 degrees. He said some sensitive bolts on BMWs would rattle loose with 1/2 in-lb too little and break off with 1/2 in-lb too much. (Maybe it was N-M??? cannot remember).
I know some will disagree, but that is what he said...and he was way up the BMW ladder. Right after that seminar,
one buddy bought a FJR, one a Verses 1000, and I bought an ST1300
 

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I have always wondered: Do torque wrenches ever need recalibrating? And if so, how many people have ever had their torque wrenches (re)calibrated since they bought them? Were they correct to begin with? How does anyone know? Should we just take Harbor Freight's or Sears's word for it that a torque wrench is accurate? I would take Snap-On's word that a torque wrench was at close to correct when new, but will it stay that way over time? I have a couple of torque wrenches that are over 50 years old. Just because they read that a nut's been torqued to 50lbs doesn't mean that that nut is accurately torqued anywhere near 50lbs.(I also have a nuts that are over 50 years old, but that's different.)
I run a calibration lab. We cal a very large quantity of torque wrenches. Most are on a one year interval. I see a lot that are out of tolerance
 

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I run a calibration lab. We cal a very large quantity of torque wrenches. Most are on a one year interval. I see a lot that are out of tolerance
I'm guessing professionals and serious amateurs get that done. I don't personally know anyone who has even thought about it.
 
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It's not hard to calibrate them yourself. I think someone in here put the procedure in the diy section a few years back.
 
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