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Discussion Starter #1
I am disassembliing,cleaning, and re-assembling my right side fork with new parts and oil. The bottom hex socket bolt is just spinning the cartridge end and will not loosen further or even re-tighten. I have the fork assembled so that the spring is assisting some in trying to hold the cartridge, but its not near enough. I tried drill spinning a hex key in it, no luck. Anyione got any other good tricks of the trade? Building a jig to compress teh whole shock to get more resistance - take teh fork tube pout and try to foul the cartridge some way?

The left side had a blown seal and the right was OK, but I that was not good enough, I had to tear 'em both apart :roll: . The left one came aprat slick as button.

BTW, a common schedule 40 PVC 1 1/2 plaine pipe joint coupling makes a fine fork seal driver just the way it comes from the plumbing shop.

prs
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Red, that would be an option, except the bolt spins so freely that the drill bit is just gonna spin it instead of cutting it. Its pretty foar down in a blind hole. I have a new bolt and copper seal, so if I can foul the botl head, I am not against drillilng it out.

Slim
 

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Discussion Starter #5
fzj9wq said:
A 3/8" drive impact wrench worked for me.
The kind you strike with a hammer or the high speed air driven type?

prs
 

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I had to drill one of mine. Our local big dealership had the bolt for only one side and thank goodness, it was the side I needed. I thought drilling the bolt was going to be a real b1tch, but the bolt material was not near as hard as I was expecting. My bolt problem was the internal hex got wallered out (is that a word?), so I did not have the problem wth spinning while drilling. Good luck with it.
 

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I ran into this same problem on the right side fork leg on Steve Aylors bike. Honda puts thread lock on those bolts and they can be a bear to get loose.

The bottom plug insert that the bolt threads into in the bottom of the damper cartridge in Steve's bike was turning with the bolt. We worked on it for about half an hour and tried applying heat, and putting pressure on the top of the cartridge to keep it from spinning. Even when we held the cartridge still at the top, the bolt still spun freely, as the plug in the bottom of the cartridge itself just turned.

We kept after it with heat and pressure and eventually it broke free. Once we got it out, I took the C clip off the bottom plug and pulled it out of out of the cartridge and found the threads had a burr on them. I held the plug in a vice and cleaned the threads out and that fixed it.

So I guess my suggestion would be to try mild heat, but don't use a torch as you might ignite the fork oil. Use a heat gun. With the fork cap off, try to wedge a small dowel or something between the inner wall of the damper cartridge and the fork tube (be gently so you don't damage the damper). You might also try moving the position of the damper cartridge around a bit to see if you can get it at an angle that aids in breaking the bolt free. I seem to recall this helped us.

Worse case scenario, take the fork leg off, and take it into your dealer and ask them for help. They may have some tools and tricks that would be helpful.
 

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fork bolt

I experienced the same problem 2 months ago rebuilding mine. I cut a long allen wrench, slipped it into a socket on my 3/8 air impact, triggered the impact several times, torqing the bolt loose. Was wondering if I was going to get it out. Once you get it out, run a tap in the threads and clean the bolt with a die nut. You'll be able to run it in easy by finger and tighten with an allen wrench as intended.
 

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Another vote for an air impact wrench.....it worked for me!
 

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air powered butterfly (above harbor freight tool) worked for me!!!..chuck
 

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fork bolt

Try using a center punch inserted into the head of the bolt. Hit it pretty good a couple of times. Then compress the fork while turning. Since it is already spinning you may still need to use an impact. 9 out of 10 forks we do will come apart without using an impact if this is done first.
 

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What I have done for many years is strip the fork down as much as possible and then push down inside the fork tube with a broom handle while someone else works on the bolt. The broom handle can stop the spinning without damageing anything else.

Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well, I'll give all of this the good ole try. I have a couple of possible tricks up my own sleeve so I will report back.

Strider; I am not sure I follow what your saying; the oil drain plug is the screw tht is stuck in the cartridge bottom -- I have already dumped the oil out of the top, but need (want) to change the slider and guide bushings and seals.

I will compress the fork and/or try other methods to foul the dampening rod and then use impact and mild heat to remove -- don't have an air impact wrench -- maybe its about time I got one.

prs
 

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put the lower fork leg in a vise,pull on the top leg at the same time, loosen the bolt.
it worked for me....
 

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tbyrne said:
put the lower fork leg in a vise,pull on the top leg at the same time, loosen the bolt.
it worked for me....
Ding ding ding! The winner!
:)

Compressing the fork with the spring in it will work for damper rod forks.

There are two types of cartridge forks. Where the topout spring is located dictates whether to push or pull on the fork. The GL fork is an "external top out spring" cartridge.

The bolt in the bottom is NOT a drain bolt.

The part is it screwed into is the "Base Valve Holder" or Compression Valve Holder". If excess loctite has been applied to the bolt, then even air tools won't get it apart.

Downward pressure on the tube actually RELAXES the pressure between the base valve holder and the clip that retains it. You need to INCREASE the pressure to make drag.

So with the fork assembled or not, PULL on the chrome tube while turning by hand, hitting with hand impact, or using air tool.

If that doesn't work, (you need two people for this) Have one person "slide hammer" the fork as if you are trying to separate the two halves while one person is holding the air gun wide open. Each slam will momentarily lock the base valve holder and give the air gun a chance to put a spin on the bolt.

If this doesn't work, you can drill the head off the bolt. PULL on the chrome tube and drill.

If this fails, you will have to get it REALLY hot. We have never seen fork oil catch fire. You need to turn the loctite back into liquid. The fork will be smokin' quite a bit if you have to get to this stage. The back the bolt out.

We haven't met a fork we couldn't get apart!

:D
 
S

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Gee Max what happened to the old days when you just dumped thinner down the fork tube and pumped it a few time to get the gunk out and just refilled... :?:

...everything is so hi-tech these days.. :roll:
 
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