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Subject: FW: FW: SR-71 Slide Show & Narrative - Worth Viewing



Fred this is the SR71 slide show I spoke about several weeks ago jay jay enjoy


In 1968 (1967?) a SR-71 made an emergency landing at Grand Forks AFB and was "parked" between two B-52 hangers close to the N/S road that paralleled the base runway. The aircraft was completely visible to anyone using the road. Immediately after landing, GFAFB security established machine gun "nests" close to the plane. The two man crew could not exit the plane until a C-130 arrived from Edwards AFB with the ground support equipment and aircraft technicians to evacuate the crew and "fix" whatever the problem(s) were. Of course, everyone on the base came to see the 71 and security had to control traffic. After the "fixes" were accomplished (two days?), the 71 exited the base heading north. A few minutes later it returned a t a very low altitude at tremendous speed in a fly by. It was awesome and was probably witnessed by about everyone on the base.

Eye candy for people who like airplanes

Grab your beverage and relax for a few minutes of awesome beauty. The SR-71 was the creation of Kelly Johnson, Lockheed, Eisenhower and the Air Force. It was envisioned in the '50s, first flew in the early '60s, retired in the '80s, briefly brought back in the '90s.

In all, 13 units of the single seat A-12 were built, and 32 of the Pilot + Recon two seat SR-71 units were built. Five A-12 were lost, one is stored. Twelve two seaters were lost. The remaining 27 are on display around the USA . The closest is at Atwater, the old Castle AFBmuseum at Merced with 50 other classic warplanes. You probably have a better opportunity of viewing the one in San Dieg o. Ask me and I'll tell you where the others are. NY, OR, OH, DC, etc. I can find most answers to most questions. Just ask. Start
with the 2000+ mph, the 80,000 feet + altitude. More if you wish.

So enjoy. One more thing. The author of the captions to the picture in this video made one misstatement, due to youth. The U-2 Recon aircraft was created in 1955, flew operationally in 1956. Kelly thought the USSR would shoot it down in 18 months. Lucky us, it flew until Gary Powers was downed on 1 May 1960.
But Kelly Johnson already had the go-ahead from Ike for the A-12. It first flew in 1962, JFK kept the manufacture of it active. No one told LBJ, 'cause everyone knew he would spill the secret. He wasn't told til the week after JFK left us. And sure enough, LBJ gave out the secret in a matter of months.

Anyhow, the most interesting, most exciting five years of my life were spent in the program, as a KC-135 refueling pilot. Where the Blackbird went, we went. You will see several refuelings in the following.
Enjoy.

Click here to view the slideshow:





http://www.greatdanepromilitary.com/SR-71/index.htm










 

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For anyone that wants to see this plane up close and go for a nice ride in the process it at the air museum in Mcminnville, Or. right next to the Spruce Goose.
 

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That was GREAT !!!!!!!

Thanks,
 

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Just to keep this motorcycle related, I presume you rode your wing up to the fence to see the bird?:yes:
 

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When I was stationed at MCAS Futenma, Okinawa, Japan... practically right next door to Kadena AFB, where the SR-71 "Habu" (as they called it there) was kept... I used to head over to Kadena every now & then to watch fly the pattern.

In the Tower and Radar Rooms over at Futenma... we always knew when the SR-71 was about to take-off. First, all of our normal IFR departures would be ground-stopped for a "priority mission". Then, a flight of two fighters would take off (either F-16's or F-15's, or F-4's)... followed immediately by a tanker (either a KC-135 or KC-10)... and finally about 5 minutes later, the SR-71.

If it was a cloudy day, anyone else who lived nearby also knew when the 'Habu' took-off... because you could hear the roar from it's engines on departure at least 5 miles away. (sound echos off of clouds)

When it returned, it would always fly a few touch & go's in the pattern before making a full-stop landing... and we'd watch it fly, either from the catwalk of Kadena's tower, or out by the fence at the approach end of the runway. I was told by some fellow USAF controllers that the reason it did this was so the skin of the aircraft would cool at a somewhat even pace after it's fast, steep descent from altitude... thus keeping it from buckling & weakening... but I've never been able to confirm that independently.

I do know the plane was made in such a way as to allow for the aircraft's skin to expand & contract... as it's a know fact the plane leaked like a sieve while taxiing prior to take off. When the aircraft's skin would heat up in flight from friction, the joints would expand & seal. This was one reason why the aircraft had to make an immediate airborne re-fueling after take-off. The fuel loss from the leaks and the engine burn to around 40,000 feet used up most of what it had aboard when it left the hanger.
 

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Thanks for the reminder. I was in Air Force ROTC the first time I saw the Blackbird. I wanted so badly to be a pilot of an SR-71. This was 1969 and Vietnam era and the Blackbird was perfect. Flew too high for ground to air missiles and too fast for air to air missiles. It seemed the perfect way NOT to get my a$$ shot off. Alas, it was not to be. But I remember watching classified films of it in action. The most impressive thing I ever saw was a low level pass when the pilot stood it on its tail and it was gone straight up out of sight before you could blink. Perhaps the most beautiful plane ever built.
 

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That was awesome Thanks:yes1::yes1::yes1:
 

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There is also one on display in front of the space museum in Huntsville, Al.
Totally awesome airplane. I was fortunate to be assigned to the U-2's and had an SR 71 make an emergency landing in Utapao, Thailand in the early 70's. It was kept in one of our hangers, and the ****pit locked, even from us U2 guys. Any of you 99 SRS guys looking at this site?
 

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Hey Tom (Radar Contact), I too was stationed at Kadena, from 1970-73. I was a staff sergeant with the 400th MMS. My guys fed the B-52's their steady diet of MK82 and M117 bombs. Yes, I recall how everything stopped when the SR71 (Ol Habu) came out. You had to look quickly. They would come out of their hangar at a pretty fast clip then accelerate to a high speed taxi to the main. I don't recall them ever slowing down, just turning on the runway and shooting the juice to the bird. I'll swear it was a 50 foot blue flame that came out of the twin engines, along with the deafening roar and that rumbling you could feel in your feet. The thing would accelerate at incredible speed and climb out at what looked like a 50 degree angle (if not steeper) and be out of sight in less than 30 seconds.

Hey Wingman, I was statoned at Utapao in 67. What a fantastic place that was.
 

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When I was stationed at MCAS Futenma, Okinawa, Japan... practically right next door to Kadena AFB, where the SR-71 "Habu" (as they called it there) was kept... I used to head over to Kadena every now & then to watch fly the pattern.

In the Tower and Radar Rooms over at Futenma... we always knew when the SR-71 was about to take-off. First, all of our normal IFR departures would be ground-stopped for a "priority mission". Then, a flight of two fighters would take off (either F-16's or F-15's, or F-4's)... followed immediately by a tanker (either a KC-135 or KC-10)... and finally about 5 minutes later, the SR-71.

If it was a cloudy day, anyone else who lived nearby also knew when the 'Habu' took-off... because you could hear the roar from it's engines on departure at least 5 miles away. (sound echos off of clouds)

When it returned, it would always fly a few touch & go's in the pattern before making a full-stop landing... and we'd watch it fly, either from the catwalk of Kadena's tower, or out by the fence at the approach end of the runway. I was told by some fellow USAF controllers that the reason it did this was so the skin of the aircraft would cool at a somewhat even pace after it's fast, steep descent from altitude... thus keeping it from buckling & weakening... but I've never been able to confirm that independently.

I do know the plane was made in such a way as to allow for the aircraft's skin to expand & contract... as it's a know fact the plane leaked like a sieve while taxiing prior to take off. When the aircraft's skin would heat up in flight from friction, the joints would expand & seal. This was one reason why the aircraft had to make an immediate airborne re-fueling after take-off. The fuel loss from the leaks and the engine burn to around 40,000 feet used up most of what it had aboard when it left the hanger.
The SR-71 is truly an amazing aircraft and probably never will be equaled unless one believes that it might have been replaced by "Aurora" but that is only speculation. The SR-71 does like to burn fuel. At mach 3, it burns JP-7 at the rate of 8,000 gallons per hour as the P&W J-58 was the only engine designed to operate continuously at full afterburner. A good book to read about building the U-2, SR-71, and the F-117 is Skunk Works by Ben Rich.
 

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What an awesome reminder of what the American Spirit can accomplish.
 

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I saw it one time on a low level approach in Okinawa and in the middle of the runway he pointed it upward and it looked to me like at 90 degrees to the runway and within seconds he was out of sight. The roar was tremendous. and sight was awesome
 

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heres a complete list of all the survivors and where they are on display

its my brothers web site

http://www.johnweeks.com/sr71/index.html

click on the tail numbers and see an actual photo of that plane

also hundreds of other war birds on his site, just look around


i have seen almost everyone of them, in person
 

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Great film, Makes me want to reenlist back into the USAF. Do they take 52 year old husky men with glasses?. When I was in the USAF (1974th comm. Group), I repaired and aligned satellite encryption systems for Uncle Sam. Sometimes we would intercept the Blackbirds signals and use them to check the tolerances of our repeaters. We were able to accomplish this because the plane would sometimes fly so high and fast that we could use its signals to align many repeaters at once.
The Blackbird was a unique plane, not only did it have a flawless record. It was so ahead of its time combining high tech engineering and pure brute engine power. The plane and its pilots deserve our thanks and respect for keeping us free.
 

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Great show. Thanks for taking the time to share this with all of us.
 

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Have had the honor of visiting the museum in dayton. A lot of great aircraft but the sr71 is certainly an eye catcher. Also seen it in destin fl.

Thanx for the show

good riding
 
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