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After attending a basic motorcycle riders class I am conflicted about this friction zone mode. If I understand it correctly, you drag the rear brake, slip the clutch and give it some throttle. That is contrary to any clutch operation I have done in the past which is never slip the clutch. A burnt clutch is expensive to replace.
So what say ye? Do you all practice and use the friction zone? If so, how long does your clutch last? Does this old dog need to learn a new trick?
 

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unless you are doing extensive slow speed maneuvers you won't be slipping it long... and if you weren't actually slipping clutches before you had extremely jerky starts... more than likely you've been slipping the clutch the starting out on any manual transmission vehicle you've driven and not realized it... I kinda had the same thing happen to me about counter steering... never realized I was doing it... 'course I started riding with almost zero instruction on how to ride a motorcycle (not something I recommend)



I slip the clutch doing the maneuvers in the video below... been doing it for about 15 years and have not burned out a clutch... that video was taken in August of 2019 on my bought new 2014 Goldwing... no clutch replacement and the only hesitation to hopping on it and going cross country with my wife and a trailer on would be "do I have fresh tires?"


 

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After attending a basic motorcycle riders class I am conflicted about this friction zone mode. If I understand it correctly, you drag the rear brake, slip the clutch and give it some throttle. That is contrary to any clutch operation I have done in the past which is never slip the clutch. A burnt clutch is expensive to replace.
So what say ye? Do you all practice and use the friction zone? If so, how long does your clutch last? Does this old dog need to learn a new trick?

If you're on a wing, then you can't "Drag the rear brake" anyhow, as there ain't one... since it's a Linked (front/rear) brake system.


Besides, for a "Basic" Rider, there's Far far more important things to learn than how to "Go Fast Through Corners", which I presume is the goal of teaching this topic. Like, "Look for traffic"... would be a more important topic.


Motorcycle clutches don't wear out like those on cars do... you'll be hard pressed to ever wear out your clutch, short of using the bike for drag racing, or extended parade-riding
 
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If you're on a wing, then you can't "Drag the rear brake" anyhow, as there ain't one... since it's a Linked (front/rear) brake system.
yeeehhhh that's true but not... you can drag the rear brake... but your gonna get a bit of front brake in there as well... but it will be mostly rear brake..
 

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I slip the clutch and drag the rear brake all the time in slow speed maneuvers. I practice with my wife on back. I've never had a clutch issue and my last wing had 165K miles when I sold it.

I've never noticed an issue with the linked brakes at slow speed. If the front brake was activating it was ever so slightly and never affected any maneuvers.
@Rosknight, I should be doing more of THAT! :wink2:
 

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Slipping the clutch and riding the rear brake is basically to stabilize the drive train so there is no slop and allows you to feather the power as needed. You are only doing this for a very short time and only during low speed maneuvers so no more of a clutch issue than starting off.
 

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technoholic, just in case you are new to Goldwings, the clutch is what is known as a "wet clutch." The clutch and gears are lubricated with the engine oil. That doesn't make sense, right? Slipping the clutch is permissible, unlike the clutch on your grandpa's '63 Chevy. Practice that friction zone without worry.
 

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Rosk,
Nice riding maneuvers..........:wink2:


I'm impressed totally! I never tried that type of riding, (actually worried that I'd not do so good of a job) Thumbs up!!

Ronnie
 
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Discussion Starter #11
technoholic, just in case you are new to Goldwings, the clutch is what is known as a "wet clutch." The clutch and gears are lubricated with the engine oil. That doesn't make sense, right? Slipping the clutch is permissible, unlike the clutch on your grandpa's '63 Chevy. Practice that friction zone without worry.

Thanks for that! For some reason I was under the misconception it was a dry clutch. A wet clutch would be a lot better suited to friction zone usage. Thanks for bringing me up to date!
 

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In the motorcycle training class I took they taught us that the “friction zone” relating to the clutch was the area in the clutch lever travel where the clutch just starts to engage, moving the bike forward under its own power.

-John
 

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unless you are doing extensive slow speed maneuvers you won't be slipping it long... and if you weren't actually slipping clutches before you had extremely jerky starts... more than likely you've been slipping the clutch the starting out on any manual transmission vehicle you've driven and not realized it... I kinda had the same thing happen to me about counter steering... never realized I was doing it... 'course I started riding with almost zero instruction on how to ride a motorcycle (not something I recommend)



I slip the clutch doing the maneuvers in the video below... been doing it for about 15 years and have not burned out a clutch... that video was taken in August of 2019 on my bought new 2014 Goldwing... no clutch replacement and the only hesitation to hopping on it and going cross country with my wife and a trailer on would be "do I have fresh tires?"


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9UiwYrOksA&t=3s

Great job on those low speed maneuvers. That is the skill I need to acquire and now that I know the Wing is a wet clutch things look a lot better.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
So thanks to all for the friction zone education! The bottom line is this old dog does need to learn some new tricks. Now to find an empty parking lot.
 

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I'm amazed at how many people who have been riding motorcycles for years don't know how to ride slowly without duck walking their bikes.


A lot of old riders need to go take a basic riders course.
 

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@technoholic, glad to hear you have an open mind on this. A few things to keep straight as you explore:

1) Use the friction zone for smooth power delivery at low speeds. Typically for limited space maneuvers. It is not just not bad, it is an ESSENTIAL BASIC SKILL. I know I can hear my father's voice saying "don't ride the clutch" about half the time I do it, but he didn't ride motorcycles.

2) Keep the rear brake separate. Friction zone is all and only about clutch/throttle. Set the throttle at some revs above idle (2000, 2500, 3000, whatever) and leave it there. Modulate speed/power with SLIGHT clutch movements in the small zone between fully engaged and fully disengaged. If you're properly in the friction zone and you rev the engine, it won't jerk the bike.

3) With the Goldwing, you're probably better off in 2nd rather than 1st for your friction zone stuff. Plenty of torque, and a bit smoother.

4) Throwing in some rear brake is fine if you want to slow down a bit. It's also recommended for some maneuvers (e.g. google Ride Like a Pro with Jerry Palladino) for what it does to loading the suspension. So it may be an additive part of what you do, but it's not a part of the friction zone.
 

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That ‘friction zone’ slow speed stuff goes out the window with the DCT. I took the A.R.C. (Advanced Riders Course) on my 2018 DCT Tour recently. It was a big learning curve from when I did the course on my older ‘manual’ GL1800. Good balance & weight shifting become more important than ever!
 

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If you're on a wing, then you can't "Drag the rear brake" anyhow, as there ain't one... since it's a Linked (front/rear) brake system.


Besides, for a "Basic" Rider, there's Far far more important things to learn than how to "Go Fast Through Corners", which I presume is the goal of teaching this topic. Like, "Look for traffic"... would be a more important topic.


Motorcycle clutches don't wear out like those on cars do... you'll be hard pressed to ever wear out your clutch, short of using the bike for drag racing, or extended parade-riding

The "Linked brake system" doesn't kick in until around 20 mph, I don't think. Slow speed handling is done at about 10 mph, so linked brakes don't have an effect on slow speed riding.



But you can burn up a clutch doing too much feathering of the clutch, for too long a period of time. Space out the slow speed skills by doing a "breeze out", which Jerry Paladino calls it. That's riding around the parking lot at about 25 mph in 2nd and 3rd gear for a while. You can also burn p a clutch by using too much throttle accompanied by too much rear brake...at the same time...for extended periods of slow speed practicing. This is common at Police rodeos where they are performing at "extremes".
 

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You won't hurt the clutch. I still race harescrambles in the super senior division. Coming in on 90s and sharper corners, I am on on the rear brake a gear high slipping the clutch at very high rpm and then spooling out and my clutch still lasts 4 years or so. Regular slipping of the GW in slwo speed manuvers is nothing.

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 

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The "Linked brake system" doesn't kick in until around 20 mph, I don't think...

My linked brakes work at any speed, even Zero mph... I can have the bike up in the air, atop a stand, and the linked brakes work.
 
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