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Discussion Starter #1
Well since my brake pad change to where I drop the old ones out and put the new ones in, something has came to mind and noted here. I need to grease some items up there. After I use the brakes, it sounds like the pads are not going properly back into the float mode. Also sounds like they are touching the rotors ever so lightly until they go back into the float mode. So members brought it up on here that I need to grease some items. I am trying to find a simple way of removing the left caliper (most say this one is the one to do if nothing else) and do what is needed. Also I want to clean inside the calipers. Is that possible without taking the caliper apart? I think it would be, but wants to ask. I have Fred's Videos, but do not want to get into taking the front tire off of the wing. I know Fred had some website that had some pictures and such onit, but I have since lost that bookmark. If anyone can give me some insight to this, I would appreciate it.
 

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Steve, you really need a shop manual. You really don't need to disassemble the caliper or even fully remove it. The pin you removed to drop the pads is the one that needs to be lightly coated with silicone grease. Take care not to get the lube on the rotor or pads. The caliper pucks will not be fully retracted when the pads drop out, before forcing them in flush with the caliper inner faces, it is a good idea to use brake cleaner and a small "tooth brush" to clean them. The pucks are lubed by brake fluid from the inside, but no need to take chances in forcing grime and dirt in past the outer seals. The upper "dog ears" of the pads slip up into a flat spring loaded slot. When properly placed, you can fel the spring "give" as you press the pads upward, a sure sign you have them placed. The lubed pin will then slide right on in to peg the pads in place. I typically place one pad at a time and slide the pin part way in to hold the first as i align the second and then press the pin home and tighten it.

The brake caliper pucks can be gently pushed in flush with the inner walls of the calipers with a special brake tool, the flat handle of the common oil filter wrench Hal sells or even with a wooden paint stirring paddle -- just a steady light twist will sink them after they are clean. In use, the brake caliper pucks do not self retract to any significant degree. They just sort of float over the rotors at near zero clearance by design, so you may hear some "swoosh" at times -- if your swoosh is excessive you may have mis-assembled something or have a bent rotor retainer or warped rotor. In your pad assembly, get the OE type pad shims back in the proper places only. After the wheel/rotor/tire assembly is placed, be sure to folow the whole procedure to properly adjust and seat the wheel for clearance between the rotor and inner caliper bracket on the left side. That procedure may be in your MOM as well as the Shop Manual. Clean the rotors too as a last step. Last tip; if you have added brake fluid to your reservoir, make sure there is room in the reservoir to receive the additional fluid that will back into it as you set the caliper pucks flush with the inner caliper faces.

prs
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have the shop and cd manual also. I did not break out the shop manual, but looked at the cd and just seemed to be more involved than people say here. I just looked into the shop manual and dont look that hard. I do need to grease the pivot bearings and such. I just will not disconnect the brake lines. Now here the the dumb question of the day, I see them refer to some bolts as oil bolts. What exactly does that mean, an oil bolt?

Any other tips someone wants to add?
 

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Well the front is done. Now the rear is a different story. It looks like the rear wheel have to come off tomorrow to make things right back there. I did l a caliper pin and reinstalled it. Now things just dont seem right. Rear rotor is WAY too tight for the wheel to spin and this is without the pads. So Something is not right in paradise.

Any clues or suggestions. And yes I do have the manual.
 

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front caliper

I'm gonna' guess at the term oil bolts but I believe they would be talking about the hollow bolts that attach the brake lines to the calipers and transfer brake fluid through said lines. Never heard them called oil bolts and to continue with another theme these too have crush washers that are important to replace after a few times of use.---Jeff
 

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SC Steve said:
Well the front is done. Now the rear is a different story. It looks like the rear wheel have to come off tomorrow to make things right back there. I did l a caliper pin and reinstalled it. Now things just dont seem right. Rear rotor is WAY too tight for the wheel to spin and this is without the pads. So Something is not right in paradise.

Any clues or suggestions. And yes I do have the manual.
Don't really know what you're up to. LOL... Have you been playing with the front calipers without the rear pads being installed? If so, you forced the pistons out of the rear caliper.
 

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The manual says to put a bit of silicone grease on the O ring on the end of the caliper pin just to keep the O ring in good shape. However, this is in no way the cause of pads sticking.

What I demonstrate applying grease to, is the SLIDES that the caliper floats on. These slides are what allows the caliper to center itself on the rotor as the pads wear. The caliper has to be able to float to center. I recommend you use a high temp silicone based grease made for brakes, since the slides have rubber boots on them, and regular grease will break down the rubber.

In order to access the slides, you will have to remove the caliper from the wheel and pull the halves apart enough to access the large bore pins that the two halves slide on. You may be able to lift up the boot a bit and work grease down under it onto the pin. Smear grease on the pins, and push it back together and make sure the rubber boots are back in place.

WHATEVER YOU DO, DON'T GET GREASE ON THE ROTORS OR PADS!! Carefully clean off any grease residue when you are done, and only get the grease on the slide pins, and NO WHERE ELSE.

http://www.pbase.com/fredharmon/brakepads





On the below photo of the right front caliper, if you look close, you can see one slide pin is attached to the outboard half of the caliper, and the other is attached to the inboard half still on the bike (you can see the end of it facing you).



 

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Discussion Starter #8
Red said:
SC Steve said:
Well the front is done. Now the rear is a different story. It looks like the rear wheel have to come off tomorrow to make things right back there. I did l a caliper pin and reinstalled it. Now things just dont seem right. Rear rotor is WAY too tight for the wheel to spin and this is without the pads. So Something is not right in paradise.

Any clues or suggestions. And yes I do have the manual.
Don't really know what you're up to. LOL... Have you been playing with the front calipers without the rear pads being installed? If so, you forced the pistons out of the rear caliper.
no I didnt. But that is a good question though. I think it is something not lining up with the capiler and the caliper bracket once I look closer at the assembly in the manual 15-a-35.

I am going to take the rear wheel off tomorrow. I have never done this, but has seen it done and looks simple enough. Then I think I will be able to get the caliper off and see what is going on. It is close and tight fit. I thought the caliper would fall off and out. But no luck. I was going to clean the caliper pistons and such like I did in the front. 5 minute job going to take all day.

Thanks to both of you for the replies. But the thing that still bothers me is when I went to drop the new brake pads out, I had a very difficult time in getting them to do so. This is making me thing somehting may be wrong on the inside that I need to see.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Fred H. said:
One of the things I cover on my new 2 disc DVD update is removing the rear caliper and lubricating the pins on it. You might want to take a look at it if you have it.
Most definitely Fred..... I was thinking of getting them before, but now I need to order. I have not used the videos like I should, but they are very informative.

Any they are special or anything by chance? I think you did have a sale on them at the end of last year.

I found the problem to my rear wheel not wanting to move. Once I removed the wheel and took the caliper off, I noticed the pad retainer not in the correct spot. So I took care of that and restalled the pads. Then put it all back on the rotor. I did a rear good cleaning and polish while the wheel was off of the bike, so that is my one time in 50k miles. :) :) I was chicken before about removing the rear or front tire. and now I am just chicken on the front.

Thanks Fred for all information and such you do for us wingers. I know it has helped alot of us saved a bunch of $$$$.
 
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