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Neighbor friend is a new trike owner. He wants to know what front tire works best on a trike with easy steer and independent rear suspension.

stan
 

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OEM works just fine...........I usually get 18 to 20k out of mine. It's 90% proper balancing and the rest is tire pressure and suspension alignment.
 

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Most trikes run either an MPA -Michelin pilot Activ, Bridgestone BT45 Battleaxe, or Metzlers ( sorry cant remember the Metzler number). These are all bias ply rear street tires . You'll get over 20,000 miles out of these tires and being bias ply the steering will be easier also.The stock front radial on a wing works fine on 2 wheels but usually on a trike you'll get 7-9000 miles before its gone. If you use search you''ll find an abundance of info on these tires in the trike forum section.
 

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I have used the MPA and the BT45 for well over 35K on each. The MPA appears to cup a bit fast and develops a "buzz" in the handlebars as a result, but lasts. I am finishing out an MPA now on the trike and have a BT45 waiting. Can not go wrong with either.
:thumbup:
 

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OEM works just fine...........I usually get 18 to 20k out of mine. It's 90% proper balancing and the rest is tire pressure and suspension alignment.
Please share w/us what you mean by and how to align the suspension:?:
To the OP, having very good service from a Stone BT45 reverse mounted on my Hannigan IRS w/rake kit @ 41PSI.
 

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Please share w/us what you mean by and how to align the suspension:?:
To the OP, having very good service from a Stone BT45 reverse mounted on my Hannigan IRS w/rake kit @ 41PSI.

Not "how to align" ..... that's the job of the manufacturer and the guy who puts your trike kit on to insure it runs straight down the road. A trike that even slightly dogtracks is pushing sideways against the front tire, also if you have a new triple tree system and the forks were not put back in at the same height you have a out of balance front end. What some here don't realize is that even your rear tires will wear out your front tire if they are:
A. Not properly balanced
B. The pressure is over or under inflated 41 is optimum
C. Or uneven from side to side the exception is Han. which requires 2lbs more on the diff. side.

If one or both side mirrors vibrate something is out of balance on the Trike.

I see wheels up there has gotten lots of miles out of his front tires. How many miles do you have on your Motor Trike trike total and are the rear tires still the original ones?


Btw cupping is not a charatristic of any tire it is not properly balancing them or under inflation that causes it. All these beads and fluids used to balance are junk.
 

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Front Tire

I have run Avon Venom tires for a while and had great luck with them. They are a bit more expensive, but I think they are well worth it.
I have an 02 Hannigan with easy steer and they wear great. :thumbup:

Rosy
From NH
 

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Thanks-I was wondering how I would align "things".
Also "All these beads and fluids used to balance are junk." is not a statement I would make! Been using RideOn for years and it maintains balance perfectly! Also, it has not "attacked my rims" nor has it "gobbed" inside the tire.
 

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Hwy Warrior

I'm hoping to pick up my Hannigan trike this week and am curious about your statement that the differential side needs +2. Is that the drive shaft side?
Thanks.
 

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I'm hoping to pick up my Hannigan trike this week and am curious about your statement that the differential side needs +2. Is that the drive shaft side?
Thanks.
Yes-right side +2 but, having said that, here is my method to determine right amount of air:
Water down a flat paved area(driveway).
Pump the rears up to about 35psi.
Start riding the bike forward/reverse over the wet paved area letting small amounts of air out until you see a full tread width flat tire track left in the wet pavement.
Check the tire pressure in each rear tire.
Repeat this process w/the various way your trike will be loaded and record the pressures for future reference.
That's how I arrived @ 24psi left and 26 right for my 2-up settings.
 

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Was wondering Warrior...do you really run 41 lbs in the rear tires or was that a typo?

What some here don't realize is that even your rear tires will wear out your front tire if they are:
A. Not properly balanced
B. The pressure is over or under inflated 41 is optimum
C. Or uneven from side to side the exception is Han. which requires 2lbs more on the diff. side.

If one or both side mirrors vibrate something is out of balance on the Trike.

I see wheels up there has gotten lots of miles out of his front tires. How many miles do you have on your Motor Trike trike total and are the rear tires still the original ones?


Btw cupping is not a charatristic of any tire it is not properly balancing them or under inflation that causes it. All these beads and fluids used to balance are junk.
 

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I'm hoping to pick up my Hannigan trike this week and am curious about your statement that the differential side needs +2. Is that the drive shaft side?
Thanks.
This is a matter of opinion that has been repeated numerous times on this forum. I think it was originated by someone seeking to compensate for highly crowned roads; and or perhaps for improper alignment.

I had a Hannigan trike and a Roadsmith trike and used the same inflation pressure in both rear tires. I wouldn't recommend differentials of even as little as 2# as it could affect emergency handling, IMO.
 

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This is a matter of opinion that has been repeated numerous times on this forum. I think it was originated by someone seeking to compensate for highly crowned roads; and or perhaps for improper alignment.

I had a Hannigan trike and a Roadsmith trike and used the same inflation pressure in both rear tires. I wouldn't recommend differentials of even as little as 2# as it could affect emergency handling, IMO.
Ben, I also have always used the same air pressure (24 psi) in both rear tires and find that it serves me well. I re-aligned my rears very carefully and since then I've been extremely happy with the performance of my Hannigan. On the interstate I can release the handlebars and it will go straight for a good distance.

To each his own I guess. :thumbup: Doc
 

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I agree with Mick and Wheels.

When I bought my 2008 and it had 2 wheels, OEM Dunlops they only lasted about 8,000 miles. Then I had a Champion solid axle trike kit installed and the dealer, Sloan's of Murfreesboro, Tn., called and said I needed a new front tire. I just said "Go ahead." It came back with a MPA on the front, two Dunlops on the rear two. I put Dyna Beads in all 3, set front air pressure at 41 and rears 18 to 22 pounds. I also have EZ Steer. Front now has over 14,000 on it and doing fine, but like others I got the MPA whine and may try the Battlax next. Of course the rears are only going on 3 yrs old and doing great.
 

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Where to get the tire.

ok I have a question.. where do you all get this Bridgestone BT 45.. I cant find it anywhere around where I live.. and if you order it.. how long does it usually take. Im in Stafford Va...
 

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Several mail order/internet vendors can get the tire to you in short order. So can a motivated local brick and mortar store. Stores like to steer customers to what they have in stock. If they aren't willing to accommodate your preferences, they don't deserve your business, IMO.
 
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