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THat’s the procedure for those racer gold wings with the high performance race engines in them. I don’t even pre-fill the filter In my old outdated roadcouch. I’d say just make sure that there is oil in it before starting it up.
 

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Y'all are old school. Wide open throttle on a carbureted engine results in air/fuel. On a fuel injection engine, wide open shuts off the fuel injection system to allow for clearing a fuel flooded engine (stuck injector or other issue).

Cranking with starter vs starting engine. Lower rpm with starter, less shear stress on oil lubricated components. HOWEVER, modern oils and engine manufacturing techniques this is a mute point. Racing the engine on initial startup is not good for it, both due to lack of oil pressure and the engine being cold (thermal stresses and clearance issues). But normal starting - not an issue. Enough oil film remains to lubricate the engine. Enough engine testing has been done over the years regarding this.

And I was the senior metrologist for a testing lab - I can attest there is no need to do a "dry crank" before starting the engine.
 

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Y'all are old school. Wide open throttle on a carbureted engine results in air/fuel. On a fuel injection engine, wide open shuts off the fuel injection system to allow for clearing a fuel flooded engine (stuck injector or other issue).

Cranking with starter vs starting engine. Lower rpm with starter, less shear stress on oil lubricated components. HOWEVER, modern oils and engine manufacturing techniques this is a mute point. Racing the engine on initial startup is not good for it, both due to lack of oil pressure and the engine being cold (thermal stresses and clearance issues). But normal starting - not an issue. Enough oil film remains to lubricate the engine. Enough engine testing has been done over the years regarding this.

And I was the senior metrologist for a testing lab - I can attest there is no need to do a "dry crank" before starting the engine.
Exactly.
 

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This is a very interesting post for me cause I always worried about that red (no oil light) light, that came on after I changed my oil/filter.. and I have OCD problems when it comes to oil changes, for those that have read many of my previous, you know that I change oil quite often, and never even close to that 8,000 mile schedule, many times under 2000 miles when I'm planning on a long trip, you can guarantee that I will start out with a fresh oil/filter change....return home. and change it again.... o_O

Ronnie
 

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Very little stress on the moving parts in the engine when using the starter. Probably less than 200 rpm no load versus 1200 rpm.
Also let's the oil fill the filter.
I've done this on every GW I've owned. I think Fred H agreed with this procedure.

There have been quite a few posts about this on the site.

Here's one of them:
Look at this logically. The oil pump is mechanical. 200rpm vs 1200 rpm means that while cranking, the oil pump is pumping 1/6 as much oil per second. You are gaining nothing.
 

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I could see following the WOT procedure if an engine had not been started for something like 5-10 years or so. But that's not the norm. Oil doesn't just mysteriously fall off all the engine parts when you shut it off. It adheres to the engine parts. And it will still be there 6 months later when you pull the bike out in the spring.

Oil will get to the critical engine parts with the same number of revolutions whether cranking or idling, maybe even faster when idling because the pressure will be higher. You could actually be causing damage by cranking it at the low rpm.

I have read about hundreds of rituals on the Internet over the years for both cars and motorcycles. Most of them, like this one, are nothing more than feel good efforts that don't really accomplish anything tangible.

Your engine is not a delicate flower that needs to be coddled like a newborn baby. It doesn't need your intervention. Don't overthink this. Start it up and go, and stop worrying about it.
 

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This is a very interesting post for me cause I always worried about that red (no oil light) light, that came on after I changed my oil/filter.. and I have OCD problems when it comes to oil changes, for those that have read many of my previous, you know that I change oil quite often, and never even close to that 8,000 mile schedule, many times under 2000 miles when I'm planning on a long trip, you can guarantee that I will start out with a fresh oil/filter change....return home. and change it again.... o_O

Ronnie
Get over it!! :D
 

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THat’s the procedure for those racer gold wings with the high performance race engines in them. I don’t even pre-fill the filter In my old outdated roadcouch. I’d say just make sure that there is oil in it before starting it up.
I don't even check that there is oil in it. It doesn't burn any, doesn't drip any....
I obsessed over it on the first Kawasaki Concours. It had a sight glass instead of a dipstick. It would be a different level from day to day depending on the weather or day of the week. It was a "thing" with those and often wondered about on the forum(s). Finally by the time I got the second one I just quit looking. Change it, add the required amount and wait until the next change interval.
Same with the ST1300, never used any and certainly never leaked any. Now on to the Wing. Checked and monitored it a bit when we first got it and now there is no point to it. Change it, ride it until it's time to change it again.
Most newer fuel injected engines don't fire up instantly with a touch of the button. My old carb'ed Concours did but the ST and the Wing both crank for a second or so before igniting. Some engines actually won't start until the ECU "sees" oil pressure.
 

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I was taught to use WOT in two scenarios on a carburated engine: when it was flooded; and after prolonged storage, the logic of the latter being that gas might have evaporated from the float boals. I always thought they were contradictory, and I believe neither would apply to a fuel-injected engine.
 

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Wow,
So much over-worry. Start it, ride it, have fun, shut it off, go to sleep. Repeat the next day.
Scott
 

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It begs to be asked, do the guys that have reached 300K, 500K and more miles on a single Goldwing do this? Is this their secret to longevity? I believe the answer is NO. It is an interesting concept, however I don't believe its justified.
 

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...both crank for a second or so before igniting. Some engines actually won't start until the ECU "sees" oil pressure.
Well, if the manufacturers have built this into the bike, doesn't that tell you a story about the importance of circulating the oil pre starting?
 

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It begs to be asked, do the guys that have reached 300K, 500K and more miles on a single Goldwing do this? ...
I have 470,000km on my GL1000 bought new in 1978. Bike has been stored every year for 6 months. I switched to E10 in 1985, I use on sale oil and brake fluid. The service intervals were so long compared to my previous bikes that I forgot to do everything else. My first coolant change was 1988 because waterpump broke so that's one thing I should have done. I did not use this WOT start procedure but just wondering if I should start now? Oh wait I don't have EFI so ...

G.

PS I am not recommending my terrible maintenance practice and with my new bike I am following the maintenance schedule for the next 40 years so hopefully no waterpump issue.
 

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Is it required? Absolutely not. Is it necessary? Probably not. Do I do it? Yes. When I brought my bike out of Winter storage 2 years ago, and started it up, the bearings rattled like it was going to come apart. It was only for a few seconds, but that few seconds was long enough to flash visions of my new to me Wing setting in the garage with a hole through the engine. Since then, I spend a few unnecessary seconds cranking the engine over to get oil in the nooks and crannys at the end of Winter, and she's never made that sound again. But that's just me. It may not help, but it certainly doesn't hurt.
 

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Well, if the manufacturers have built this into the bike, doesn't that tell you a story about the importance of circulating the oil pre starting?
The manufacturers build it into every fuel injected vehicle. It’s purpose is not for pre-lubing the engine. It’s purpose is to clear excess fuel out of the combustion chamber if you’ve flooded the engine. This can happen if you start the engine with the throttle parttially open, which is a no-no on any fuel injected engine.
 

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This really depends on the oil your are using. All great mechanics know that synthetics are so slick, that the oil film just doesn’t hold like conventionals.






Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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This really depends on the oil your are using. All great mechanics know that synthetics are so slick, that the oil film just doesn’t hold like conventionals.






Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
And you would be wrong, because synthetics are slick, but really shine because they bond to the metal at the molecular level preventing a non lubricated start.
 

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Oil is critical during the running of the engine but why? Because it reduces friction. A cold engine does not have the same friction coefficient as a hot engine. So at startup the moving parts have more tolerance until they begin to get hot and expand. I would not worry about turning an engine over several times to get oil to flow before actual start. I do not know how many times the engine turns over with the starter before actual start but I do know the start is not instantaneous. Although it sometimes seems that it is on my 2005.
 
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