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Thank you Honda TPMS for alerting me to the nail in rear tire. Limped home. Broke out the tools I carry only on bike - Safety Seal plug kit / Stop Go Mini compressor / SOG multi-tool with handy needle nose plier capability. Going cross country in October and thought this would be great non-stress training opportunity. Had a heck of a time getting the patch cord into hole. After many cuss words and re-watching safety seal install video, finally got her installed correctly. The mini compressor did it's job (loud and took several minutes) getting her up to about 30 psi. Lessons (1) Buy the Safety Seal smaller patch cords. I just had the regular cords that came with the kit. Took forever to ream the small hole large enough to insert regular (wider) cord. (2) Stick your ream tool in hole and put some air in the tire before attempting patch insert. Was getting way to much tire flex when attempting to install with mostly flat tire. Planning a long trip and never patched a tire? Suggest you practice prior. Now only decision is replace relatively new tire now, or be cheap and wait till trip. The patch is holding perfectly so gonna cheap it out till October.
 

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Always had great luck and a quick fix with the Stop and Go mushroom plugs.
The 3 that I did all held fine for the life of those tires.
Never had much luck, and always struggled with the gummie string type of plugs.
Jefro.
Every tire I've used a Stop N Go mushroom plug has failed catastrophically when the head is sheared off the mushroom plug and then the entire plug is spit out. They do not vulcanize to the tire and are only held in by the mushroom head. Furthermore, they tell you to put oil on the plug to insert it which seems crazy to me.

I've never had a sticky rope plug fail me, and I've plugged litterally dozens of tires. I'll never use a Stop N Go mushroom plug again. They belong in the trash.
 

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I don’t carry a battery powered drill, but I do carry a 1/4” twist drill bit and a pair of vice grips for reaming out the hole for a sticky rope plug. I also carry a pair of electrician’s side cutters. They work great for grabbing onto a nail or screw to remove it from the tire.
 

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2018 Honda Goldwing Tour DCT Airbag
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Well,
I've used both the mushroom and ropes and I've never, ever had any issues with either one. I still have ultra large industrial mushroom plugs and a sizeable air powered gun to install them and some smaller ones with a small air powered gun for them. Of course I don't carry them on the bike or the air guns to run them. I just carry the rope plugs with applicable tools. Yep, they can get a bit nasty to install, depending on each tire etc. You're gonna find pros and cons of both and folks that are happy with either one. You're never gonna please all the people, all the time, ain't gonna happen.

If ropes are your pleasure, then carry that kind of kit. If the mushrooms work for ya, well, it's not rocket science. As long as you can get back on the road and enjoy riding.
Scott
 

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FWIW: Don’t panic when you pick up a nail(OR screw). Chances are pretty good it will seal around the nail and let you drive hundreds of miles. PROVIDED the tire holds air! I once drove several thousand miles with a large double-headed construction nail in a brand new Metzler rear. Only needed air periodically and got me home.

Another tip, if your rear tire is completely flat there’s no way one person can get it on the center-stand. If possible, air it up and deploy the center-stand for repairs.
 

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Every tire I've used a Stop N Go mushroom plug has failed catastrophically when the head is sheared off the mushroom plug and then the entire plug is spit out. They do not vulcanize to the tire and are only held in by the mushroom head. Furthermore, they tell you to put oil on the plug to insert it which seems crazy to me.

I've never had a sticky rope plug fail me, and I've plugged litterally dozens of tires. I'll never use a Stop N Go mushroom plug again. They belong in the trash.
I'm sorry for your experience with the Stop N Go mushroom plugs. I have used them more than 6 times over the years and never had any problems with them. Something must be wrong with your installation of the plugs.
 

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Last year in early September I had my first nail in rear tire maybe 10 miles from home. I managed to pull over in a parking lot and air it up with my compressor enough to get to my garage. I only had about 4000 miles on the tire and had a Utah/ Colorado trip planned for late September (Rockies Gold). I didn’t want to chance any mishaps since I was planning to pull my trailer so I went ahead and replaced the tire. I had no issues during my trip other than my wife’s Spyder laying down on us and having to ship it back to Amarillo for warranty repairs. This means I now was pulling a trailer that was severely overloaded 2 up on my Goldwing. It handled as expected and we managed the rest of the trip. (I was glad I was not riding on a plugged tire). Picked up the Spyder on the way home and have had no issues since. I ordered a new set of Stones during the holiday sales to have on hand. Replaced the front tire in April.
Fast forward to last weekend…. Finally had a chance to ride and found another nail in rear tire. 7200 miles on this one. I went ahead and replaced the rear with the new one due to mileage. Now I should be back on the replace both when 1 is needed schedule. I typically replace both at same time with the front left with some tread on it. I don’t mind this knowing that the rear will go first. The Stones have been my best bet on this 2018 so I will stay with what has worked for me.
I have the sticky rope plug kit on my bike at all times (never been used) but don’t mind replacing the plugs and glue if I never use them every couple years.
I have to plan my rides around my work schedule so I will do whatever makes me feel secure when plugging tires.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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2018 Honda Goldwing Tour DCT Airbag
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I usually go along with most of Fortenines demos and videos. But, the "test" he performs on testing each one of those type repairs, to me, is quite stupid. I mean, who in their right mind would intentionally TRY and push a repaired plug, ANY TYPE PLUG back into a tire, just to prove some sort of point? I'm not here to argue which tire repair appliance is best. I've used them all and they all work. I carry the rope style in all three bikes and have a compressor for refill, in each bike. Use what you feel is best for you.
Scott

P.S. As a testament to the rope style, here's FOURTEEN PLUGS in our Jeep sidewall that actually worked and held air for 3 weeks 'till the tire could be replaced.
Scott

Tire Wheel Car Automotive tire Motor vehicle
 

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I usually go along with most of Fortenines demos and videos. But, the "test" he performs on testing each one of those type repairs, to me, is quite stupid. I mean, who in their right mind would intentionally TRY and push a repaired plug, ANY TYPE PLUG back into a tire, just to prove some sort of point? I'm not here to argue which tire repair appliance is best. I've used them all and they all work. I carry the rope style in all three bikes and have a compressor for refill, in each bike. Use what you feel is best for you.
Scott
My point exactly, why would he try to push the plug in from the outside and then call that a failure. No real chance anything could that in the real world.
 

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I usually go along with most of Fortenines demos and videos. But, the "test" he performs on testing each one of those type repairs, to me, is quite stupid. I mean, who in their right mind would intentionally TRY and push a repaired plug, ANY TYPE PLUG back into a tire, just to prove some sort of point? I'm not here to argue which tire repair appliance is best. I've used them all and they all work. I carry the rope style in all three bikes and have a compressor for refill, in each bike. Use what you feel is best for you.
Scott
Isnt that what is happening when you are riding down the road? the road has small rocks, debris, etc. that are pushing against the tire/plug
 
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