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I was about an hour away from my house when i picked up a screw somewhere in a metzeler ME880 on my vtx years ago. Next day went to change the oil and saw the screw. I checked the air pressure and it was around 20psi? Don't remember the amount. Pulled it out and immediately lost the air in the tire. I had ride on sealant in there. i think it saved me (and I was riding 2up with my girlfriend. i think the ride on is a great product (it balances too), but I have not put it in the GW yet.
 

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I was about an hour away from my house when i picked up a screw somewhere in a metzeler ME880 on my vtx years ago. Next day went to change the oil and saw the screw. I checked the air pressure and it was around 20psi? Don't remember the amount. Pulled it out and immediately lost the air in the tire. I had ride on sealant in there. i think it saved me (and I was riding 2up with my girlfriend. i think the ride on is a great product (it balances too), but I have not put it in the GW yet.
Ride-On goes into the trash with the Mushroom Plugs. Junk, don't put it in your wheel. You won't be able to plug a tire with it in, and it has caused corrosion inside rims so bad that it destroyed the wheel.
 

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2016 F6b Deluxe Traxxion Mega Henrys Final Drive
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Not an expert on this subject thank goodness but I really like the dyna plug for a roadside repair. The feature is the small size, don’t require reimming out. Their literature claims 90% of tire punctures are small enough that their plugs work. Easy to get into the tire. I had a flat on my Toyota Avalon, one plug and it’s fixed, been 3 months. My truck tire had a screw in it yesterday, it took 2 dynaplugs and is sealed. So easy and no reamming it out.Expensive but very compact kit. I also carry a slime rope plug kit if it’s a bigger puncture.
 

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Wow. I only read good things on it. But I'll take your word for it.

Automotive tire Gas Auto part Motor vehicle Automotive wheel system
 

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I've been using Ride On in all my bikes for 20 years, including my wing. Never had a problem with corrosion. The longest I've had any bike is about 10 years so I can't say what might happen over 15-20 years. I did have one TPMS module fail on a BMW.
Here's my latest story;
Last July I picked up a drywall screw in a newish rear tire somewhere in Idaho. I unscrewed it from the tire and lost less that a single PSI of air. I just replaced that tire this month after putting another 9,000+ miles on it.
I swear by the stuff. But I'm just one guy and my experience is anecdotal...
(I also carry a rope plug kit & mini compressor just in case)
 

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If you use a sticky rope, be sure to push it in far enough. I've patched mine only to walk out an hour later to find the tire flat and the rope sticking out of the hole a lot longer than it was inserted.
 

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Wow! That rim looks bad. My 2 cents: I don't think it's from the ride on. I used it on my "x" for 2 or 3 sets of tires (all Metzler). The rims were spoked cause I had the "s" model. Then I bought a set of cast rims off ebay, cleaned them up real good and "made it" into an "r" model. I never saw any corrosion. The one time I had the screw could have been one of those instances where you can still drive with an object in the tire and it doesn't go completely flat. But, idk I thought it worked and did what it was supposed to. I also ditched the weights and it rode glass smooth. Maybe, what was posted in that corrosion thread can happen from ride on, but I never experienced it. There were a lot of positive posts too. I also don't notice any corrosion from my air compressor. I can FEEL the moisture coming out of it too. The ride on is supposed to have corrosion inhibitors in it. But, what do I know. Someone should test it. I would be skeptical to base decisions on a couple of posts about corrosion cause ride on is used. Maybe coincidence?.....
 

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Isnt that what is happening when you are riding down the road? the road has small rocks, debris, etc. that are pushing against the tire/plug
I suppose in a perfect world, it might, MIGHT be possible for a rock or any other type of debris, that would be the same EXACT SIZE as the plug, to line up EXACTLY RIGHT with the plug and at whatever speed, 10, 20, 60, 80 mph, TRY and push that plug back in while the tire is rotating at whatever rpms at whatever speed. And it would have what, maybe 1/100th of a second, at whatever pressure, to ATTEMPT to push that plug in.


No, I'm not buying that test, not at all. There were large companies (tire repair shops) trucking companies, and a lot more, that used those mushroom plugs with air guns to install them for years and years and had pretty much zero failures. As stated earlier, Fortnine's a pretty good guy, does pretty good evaluations, does decent reports and is somewhat accurate in his declarations.

With the introduction of Discount Tire, Evans Tire, Big-O Tire, and many more, over the years, the mushroom or Umbrella style plugs have pretty much fallen by the wayside. Primarily because as ploy to win over business, these companies have vowed to repair flats at no cost. And that means a complete tire and wheel removal, breakdown of the tire, internally patch the tire, re-install and re-balance, all for free.

The rope plugs are the dominating DIY and trail repairs with other forms still available. Of course, if you have a motorcycle with TUBES in the tires, well then you don't have a whole lot of choice other than a total breakdown on the trail (or possibly on the side of a paved road) and do a patch job on the tube. Hense, this is why I took 3 days to completely convert my tube type wheels/tires on my '18 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports DCT to TUBLESS rims.

That was done in Oct of last year and I've not lost one single pound of air since I installed two new tires on those converted rims. But, in the event I get a nail or screw, I can easily plug that tire on the trail or the road vs removing the tire/wheel, breaking it all down, finding the hole, repairing it with a patch, then re-installing said tire (that can be one serious pain in the a$$ out on the trail or road) , re-inflating and re-seating the bead(s) (which also can be a pain in the a$$ if your little compressor is on the weak side).
Scott
 
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I suppose in a perfect world, it might, MIGHT be possible for a rock or any other type of debris, that would be the same EXACT SIZE as the plug, to line up EXACTLY RIGHT with the plug and at whatever speed, 10, 20, 60, 80 mph, TRY and push that plug back in while the tire is rotating at whatever rpms at whatever speed.
I can tell you from real world experience, I've had three different StopNGo Mushroom plugs spit out of three different tires. All three of them left the mushroom head inside the tire carcass after the belts in the tire sheared the head off.
 

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Every tire I've used a Stop N Go mushroom plug has failed catastrophically when the head is sheared off the mushroom plug and then the entire plug is spit out. They do not vulcanize to the tire and are only held in by the mushroom head. Furthermore, they tell you to put oil on the plug to insert it which seems crazy to me.

I've never had a sticky rope plug fail me, and I've plugged litterally dozens of tires. I'll never use a Stop N Go mushroom plug again. They belong in the trash.
I have a mushroom plug kit in the garage I used once at the house with success several years ago on our truck. Tried one other time on the side of the road in our car and just couldn't get it in there is was so hard to do laying down at the angle, ended up using rope plug and all was fine. The last time I tried the mushroom plug we picked up a small angled piece of metal, I guess because the hole was sort of oblong the mushroom plug had a slow leak. Used a rope plug and it is still holding fine. Not bothering with the mushroom plugs anymore, the kit just sits on the shelf now. Not saying they are junk, just not bothering with them.
 

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Thank you Honda TPMS for alerting me to the nail in rear tire. Limped home. Broke out the tools I carry only on bike - Safety Seal plug kit / Stop Go Mini compressor / SOG multi-tool with handy needle nose plier capability. Going cross country in October and thought this would be great non-stress training opportunity. Had a heck of a time getting the patch cord into hole. After many cuss words and re-watching safety seal install video, finally got her installed correctly. The mini compressor did it's job (loud and took several minutes) getting her up to about 30 psi. Lessons (1) Buy the Safety Seal smaller patch cords. I just had the regular cords that came with the kit. Took forever to ream the small hole large enough to insert regular (wider) cord. (2) Stick your ream tool in hole and put some air in the tire before attempting patch insert. Was getting way to much tire flex when attempting to install with mostly flat tire. Planning a long trip and never patched a tire? Suggest you practice prior. Now only decision is replace relatively new tire now, or be cheap and wait till trip. The patch is holding perfectly so gonna cheap it out till October.
[/QUOTE
 

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I was in Indy for the 2012 moto gp Sunday Monday can out from my hotel and noticed the rear of the bike was a little low maybe 10-15 psi. Found a nail in the center and the gas station was about 100yds away 👍. Rode there got the rope plug set on the handle tool, glue applied, aired up the rear tire to around 40 psi, plugged out nail, and installed rope plug. 10 mins at the most fixed. Rode back home (SE PA) after the race and no problem with the plug. And actually rode that rear tire for another 2 yrs. Been a mechanic for 32yrs and never had a rope plug fail me.
 
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I also bought a mushroom plug kit several years ago. After a couple of unsuccessful attempts to repair flats I determined it was a complete waste of money. Sticky rope plugs have never failed me.
 

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Sticky ropes with solvent cement and well rasped hope. No RideOn or other goop like Slime.

prs
 
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Another tip, if your rear tire is completely flat there’s no way one person can get it on the center-stand. If possible, air it up and deploy the center-stand for repairs.
Way! But, it ain't easy. Leaving a gas station along a 4 lane road I picked up a sharp hollow tube with a flange-ike projection. It may have been a spike from a police spike strip, I dunno for sure. Left a big hole in the rear tire. I did not get far and had to pull off along a rock highwall with the bike on a slight front end down hill attitude. I got my compressor and plug kit out and ready. Could not air the tire up, it leaked faster than the compressor could pump. So I pushed the bike up-right, stood on center stand and gave it a good tug to stand it and NOTHING budged. I tried several times and almost got it. Then, somewhat P-O'd with the situation and all the traffic whizzing by I gave it my best plus effort and SUCCESS. I centerstanded a 2002 Gold Wing with totally flat rear tire and against a slight slope at that. My hands hurt, my back hurt, and my foot hurt from the stress. It took several large sticky ropes to plug that perfectly round cored-out 1/4" hole, but it made the 10 miles or so home without loss of air. I usually trust the sticky rope repairs to go ahead and wear the tire out, but not that one. I am thinner now, but weighed about 230+ # at the time. I wonder just how much weight that was I lifted...

prs
 

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Not an expert on this subject thank goodness but I really like the dyna plug for a roadside repair. The feature is the small size, don’t require reimming out. Their literature claims 90% of tire punctures are small enough that their plugs work. Easy to get into the tire. I had a flat on my Toyota Avalon, one plug and it’s fixed, been 3 months. My truck tire had a screw in it yesterday, it took 2 dynaplugs and is sealed. So easy and no reamming it out.Expensive but very compact kit. I also carry a slime rope plug kit if it’s a bigger puncture.
I've used DynaPlugs twice and can attest that they work. I rode a rear tire about 2000 miles with one with no issues.
 

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I've used DynaPlugs twice and can attest that they work. I rode a rear tire about 2000 miles with one with no issues.
Dyna plugs are great for smaller holes, but for anything larger, I still prefer a standard sticky rope plug.
 
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