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So I'm in the process currently of becoming a MSF Instructor for the State of MD. Maryland has continued using the word Instructor instead of switching to Rider Coach. A question that was asked of me got me thinking and am curious to what folks think here.

So, What one critical issue do feel will affect the future of motorcycling and why? Or to say it another way, give one critical issue facing the motorcycling community today and why?
 

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So I'm in the process currently of becoming a MSF Instructor for the State of MD. Maryland has continued using the word Instructor instead of switching to Rider Coach. A question that was asked of me got me thinking and am curious to what folks think here.

So, What one critical issue do feel will affect the future of motorcycling and why? Or to say it another way, give one critical issue facing the motorcycling community today and why?
Just like with we (traffic engineers) are seeing with other vehicle operators?

An aging driver (rider, in this instance) population: slower reaction times, decreasing visual acuity -- compounded by an unwillingness to admit that they are no longer capable of safely riding.

Transl: more restricted ability to react to road hazards, inattentive drivers (don't get me started on how many drivers I see still using their cellphones/smart phones in violation of statutes), and deteriorating pavement conditions due to governmental budgetary conditions. For example, a large public agency here in the Seattle area (you know.. home to large multi-national corps like Boeing and Microsoft?) has decided -- from a policy and long-term financial outlook standpoint -- that large portions of the local road system are just going to be allowed to deteriorate without maintenance.

For decades.
 

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Technology.

When California Superbike School switched from 650 Ninjas to 1,000 BMW superbikes, their number of crashes plumetted. The combination of switchable fuel maps, antilock brakes and traction control made for a dramatic improvement in botton line safety. These will become standard on all but the smallest econo-bikes.

You'll be teaching panic breaking by encouraging students to "feel for the pulsing." You'll have to remind them that TC doesn't mean you can "just lean it over and punch it!" And you'll be checking newbies and squids to make SURE they are in "rain mode for these exercises."

Good luck.
 

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On the positive side, improvements in technology and reliability (the Wing is a great example) have and will continue to open up touring to a wider population that includes those that would not be able to conduct repairs on the road. From that perspective a motorcycle is now as good as a car.

On the other side economics will limit access. Factors include an aging population, fixed incomes, a general move away from Defined Benefit pension plans to Defined Contribution plans (and the market has done badly over the past decade), and rapidly increasing costs of motorcycles, fuel, and hotels.

The balance of these factors could result in a temporary increase in popularity of motorcycle touring until the economic factors outweigh the influence of technology, followed by a decline. That's my guess anyway.
 

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The 'rider' population will be (is) in a static decline as the boomer generation exits. There will be little change in rider stats then, until technology improves safety, dependability and cost...or....the hover bike is invented and is mass production available.
 

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I just don't think the youth off today is as interested in M/cycles in the same way we were when we were younger.

Want proof? Go drive by any high school
Not many bikes out there is there?/
In my H/S there were at least 50 in the lot all the time

I know all of my grand-kids show zero interest even though they have all gone for safe secure rides with grandpa ( 3 are now over 16)

The percentage of riders is going to decrease rapidly as we all die off!!!!
 

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I just don't think the youth off today is as interested in M/cycles in the same way we were when we were younger.

Want proof? Go drive by any high school
Not many bikes out there is there?/
In my H/S there were at least 50 in the lot all the time

I know all of my grand-kids show zero interest even though they have all gone for safe secure rides with grandpa ( 3 are now over 16)

The percentage of riders is going to decrease rapidly as we all die off!!!!
While you may be right, let me point out that I was 38 years old the first time I got on a motorcycle.
 

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I just don't think the youth off today is as interested in M/cycles in the same way we were when we were younger.

Want proof? Go drive by any high school
Not many bikes out there is there?/
In my H/S there were at least 50 in the lot all the time

I know all of my grand-kids show zero interest even though they have all gone for safe secure rides with grandpa ( 3 are now over 16)

The percentage of riders is going to decrease rapidly as we all die off!!!!

I've notice this too, very few bikes setting at schools, or other young peoples hang outs

While you may be right, let me point out that I was 38 years old the first time I got on a motorcycle.

You are an exception to the rule, most people start out riding motorcycles in their teens.
 

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Wishing you luck on the "becoming an instructor"! :thumbup: I was taking my instructor classes in the winter of 93, one of the worse snow storms we have had in years! LOL.

As far as your question, I too think the economy and being able to afford more expensive toys as well as more government regulations/laws.
 

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I just don't think the youth off today is as interested in M/cycles in the same way we were when we were younger.

Want proof? Go drive by any high school
Not many bikes out there is there?/
In my H/S there were at least 50 in the lot all the time

I know all of my grand-kids show zero interest even though they have all gone for safe secure rides with grandpa ( 3 are now over 16)

The percentage of riders is going to decrease rapidly as we all die off!!!!
I gotta agree with most of this with the exception of scooters. They seem to be breeding here ?!
 

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The hover bike. Battery operated with geo-anti-magnetic properties yielding scooter-like operation (automatic) and being able to lean over 90* without scraping parts. I can hardly wait.




:excited:
 

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You'll be teaching panic breaking by encouraging students to "feel for the pulsing."

Maybe years ago, but with the new "ABS systems" they will not feel the pulsing.
 

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With the advent of National Health care.. there will be risk analysis . Those having a risky lifestyle (i.e. motorcycle riders, drinkers, smokers, etc) will be dissuaded from those risky activities and behaviors. One way or another.
 

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Interesting question, and I really had to think about it. The only answer I can come up with is that I think we are, and will continue to see a decrease in the number of casual riders - like the "baby boomers" who reached an age where the kids were out of college and they had a little extra money and decided to buy bike.

This resulted in a lot of inexperienced riders on the road, many of who had never owned a bike until in their 50s. The decrease being the result of the financial meltdown, where people are being more conservative in spending on "toys".

I'd like to think this will result in somewhat fewer riders, but riders who are more of the diehards who take the sport seriously. It's seems to me that at popular lunch stops, this is what I'm seeing more of.

Is this just my imagination - or do some of ya'll see the same trend???
 

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It is maybe a bit off topic with respect the sort of replies you are wanting, but I think that the large number of very noisy bikes is a factor - if only in giving us as a group a bad reputation.

I say that as a previous owner of a Honda Shadow with Cobra Shotgun pipes and no baffles - I used to thrive on all that lovely noise !

But after a while I realized how antisocial it was and am now much happier riding the Wing with its understated turbine-like sound of power!

More and more locations are passing bylaws about noisy bikes and I do think that many people think of bikes, unnecessary noise, and antisocial behaviour as synonymous.

Brian
 

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Good point on young people not interested in motorcycles. In my son's HS there are nearly 4K students, with 2K of driving age. There is only one MC in the parking lot. It belongs to a teacher. The wife has a trike, I ride the GW. I have mentioned the MSF course to my 16 yr old son on numerous occasions. He said OK, but no real enthusiasm.
 
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