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Discussion Starter #1
So I bought a gel battery for my 1800. Not real pleased with it so far, have had to charge it twice using the special Gel charger. Just wondering what everyone else s experience is with them? Of course have not ridden much , we have strange weather around here..

Thanks for the comments in advance.

Mike
 

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I'm using the Ballistic Battery and I love it. Very strong battery with 500CCA has not failed me and has a (3) year warranty. They are more expensive but you get what you pay for.
 

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Its gonna be hard to beat the Yusa OE type/brand, especially if you buy their same exact product under the lower priced twin sister brand.

prs
 

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Its gonna be hard to beat the Yusa OE type/brand, especially if you buy their same exact product under the lower priced twin sister brand.

prs
And the "lower priced twin sister brand" is .....?
 

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Got a 3 year old Wal-Mart Battery still running strong.
 

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Its gonna be hard to beat the Yusa OE type/brand, especially if you buy their same exact product under the lower priced twin sister brand.

prs
:agree: Replaced my OEM after 7 years just because of age and going on a long trip. Seems people are never satisfied.
 

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IMO, any battery that requires a special charger will also require a special alternator. They are both chargers.

I'm not sure what a "Goldwing Experience" is, but in my life, I have found that the best way to minimize your bike's maintenance is to stick with OEM parts and not experiment. There isn't anything wrong with experimenting, as long as you are willing to accept the potential consequences.

I think it was Mazda that experimented with a gel battery for a couple of years, because it is located in the trunk. But they quickly went back to a conventional battery.
 

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IMO, any battery that requires a special charger will also require a special alternator. They are both chargers.

I'm not sure what a "Goldwing Experience" is, but in my life, I have found that the best way to minimize your bike's maintenance is to stick with OEM parts and not experiment. There isn't anything wrong with experimenting, as long as you are willing to accept the potential consequences.

I think it was Mazda that experimented with a gel battery for a couple of years, because it is located in the trunk. But they quickly went back to a conventional battery.
I'm not a fan of the gel battery technology and it really is not the best application for an auto type charging circuit. http://www.batterystuff.com/kb/articles/battery-articles/gel-vs-agm.html
 

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IMO, any battery that requires a special charger will also require a special alternator. They are both chargers.

I'm not sure what a "Goldwing Experience" is, but in my life, I have found that the best way to minimize your bike's maintenance is to stick with OEM parts and not experiment. There isn't anything wrong with experimenting, as long as you are willing to accept the potential consequences.
I agree completely.
 

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gel battery

I ran a agm on my 1999 honda shadow ace 750 and they would last 4 to 5 years. No special charger needed.
 

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My wing had a new true gel battery in it when I bought it in November of 2011. I just replaced it because it wouldn't hold a charge and has had to be kept on a float charger even when riding it daily...
 

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Truegell Battery.

I will be starting my third season on my Truegell battery. No problems so far.Spins the engine over better than ever.Have just a maintainer on it over the winter. Just wanted to try something different. Stock battery is always a good choice.
 

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I'm not a fan of the gel battery technology and it really is not the best application for an auto type charging circuit. http://www.batterystuff.com/kb/articles/battery-articles/gel-vs-agm.html
Gel batteries have their place, but like everything else in life, no technology fits every application. Gel batteries have a couple of desirable characteristics in that they are leakproof and don't emit explosive gases when being charged, which allows them to be safely used indoors. But in most other respects, other battery technologies easily outperform them.

I have a large APC UPS that powers my data server, media server, main desk computer, cable modem, and all the routers in my house. It has four large gel batteries in it. Without fail, every three years the UPS tells me that my batteries need to be replaced. When I pull them out, I will always find that at least one of the batteries is split wide open, and the rest of them are quite hot.
 

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DISREGARD..I DID NOT READ THE OP CORRECTLY..
THANK YOU LARRYM FOR CLARIFYING
..

Last year, I bought three of them at the same time..
.. one for each bike.
.. after a few months I realized one always seemed to crank slower and go dead if sat for more than a week.

... tested it, and it tested bad.
Replaced it (free exchange under warranty), and now all three have been fine.

Dennis
 

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Last year, I bought three of them at the same time..
.. one for each bike.
.. after a few months I realized one always seemed to crank slower and go dead if sat for more than a week.

... tested it, and it tested bad.
Replaced it (free exchange under warranty), and now all three have been fine.

Maybe you just got a bad one too?

From my airplane days, I don't like old style lead acid batteries in tightly closed areas (like the 'wing).
I'll take the slight capacity hit of the sealed glass mat to lessen the acid exposure.

Dennis
Dennis, I might be reading your post wrong here. Let me know if I'm off track. I am wondering if others are thinking the same thing.

Sealed AGM batteries (Absorbed Glass Mat), are NOT Gel batteries. Even though they shared similar characteristics, such as being spill proof, they are both based on different technologies, and have different characteristics. It is quite common for people to get the two types confused. A gel battery contains a paste. An AGM battery uses the same acid used in conventional batteries, but the acid is suspended in a wet fiber mat.

The OEM Goldwing battery is a sealed Glass Mat battery, and that is what should be used in our bikes. Gel batteries are extremely rare and hard to find. I doubt that even 1% of the batteries sold for Goldwings are Gel batteries. I have even seen websites advertise batteries as Gel, when in reality they are AGM.

Tru Gel is one of the very few battery companies that I know of that makes a gel battery big enough for the Wing, and it costs $50 more than the OEM Yuasa battery.

Glass Mat batteries can vent when charging, just like a standard battery, but the battery compartment is quite well ventilated. It is not a hazard.
 

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You're right …I'm wrong.
Thanks for clarifying that.
I misread and misunderstood the OP
.. have edited my post to reflect that.

Sorry for confusing the issue.

Dennis

Dennis, I might be reading your post wrong here. Let me know if I'm off track. I am wondering if others are thinking the same thing.

Sealed AGM batteries (Absorbed Glass Mat), are NOT Gel batteries. Even though they shared similar characteristics, such as being spill proof, they are both based on different technologies, and have different characteristics. It is quite common for people to get the two types confused. A gel battery contains a paste. An AGM battery uses the same acid used in conventional batteries, but the acid is suspended in a wet fiber mat.

The OEM Goldwing battery is a sealed Glass Mat battery, and that is what should be used in our bikes. Gel batteries are extremely rare and hard to find. I doubt that even 1% of the batteries sold for Goldwings are Gel batteries. I have even seen websites advertise batteries as Gel, when in reality they are AGM.

Tru Gel is one of the very few battery companies that I know of that makes a gel battery big enough for the Wing.

Glass Mat batteries can vent when charging, just like a standard battery, but the battery compartment is quite well ventilated. It is not a hazard.
 

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And the "lower priced twin sister brand" is .....?
It had slipped my mind at the time I wrote that so I had to search out the thread over on the 1300VTX forum to refresh. I blatently stole the following quote:

"Motocross is manufactured in the same factory, the same assembly process, at the same time as the Yuasa. The only difference is the label applied at the end of the manufacturing process."

The explanation is that like other companies it gives the maker a chance at a broader market selling product that is not advertised or promoted (such being very expensive) at a lower price targeted group. I am not really sure and my battery is a Yuasa.

prs
 

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It had slipped my mind at the time I wrote that so I had to search out the thread over on the 1300VTX forum to refresh. I blatently stole the following quote:

"Motocross is manufactured in the same factory, the same assembly process, at the same time as the Yuasa. The only difference is the label applied at the end of the manufacturing process."

The explanation is that like other companies it gives the maker a chance at a broader market selling product that is not advertised or promoted (such being very expensive) at a lower price targeted group. I am not really sure and my battery is a Yuasa.

prs
Unless the person that wrote that quote has actually been in the factory where those batteries are made, he is probably just guessing.

I have a lot of hands on experience with rebranded products in my career. The difference in quality is sometimes amazing. The name of the manufacturer that made the product tells you absolutely nothing once it has another company's label on it. Manufacturers can make anything as high or low quality as you want. It all depends on what you are willing to pay for it.

Rebranded products are sometimes as high of a quality as the products with the mfrs label on it. But don't count on it. That is rarely the case. If the retailer wanted the high quality version, they would buy the product with the mfr's name on it. While there are many reasons for offering rebranded products, the primary reason for a re-label is to sell a lesser quality product at a lower price.

A rebranded product will take advantage of a quality manufacturer's expertise at quality control processes, build quality, and the experience of its workers. But designers build to a spec, usually a price point. The lower the price point, the lower the quality or durability of the components used to make that product.

Ridgid and Ryobi power tools are built on the same assembly line. But nobody will ever confuse a Ryobi product with a Ridgid power tool. They are both built well, but the components to build those two brand name products are very different. Ryobi is primarily a household consumer product built for lighter, limited use, while Ridgid is built for extended use and abuse. It has to use higher quality parts for it to survive commercial use. The two products don't look alike, but that is intentional. It is designed to separate the markets of those two brands.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
So I bought a gel battery for my 1800. Not real pleased with it so far, have had to charge it twice using the special Gel charger. Just wondering what everyone else s experience is with them? Of course have not ridden much , we have strange weather around here..

Thanks for the comments in advance.

Mike
Resolved: Ended up trashing the Gel and getting a YUSA OEM, should have done that in the first place.
 
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