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Discussion Starter #1
First off no one was hurt, just shook up!

The youngest daughter and I went for a nice fall ride today. On the last curve before we got home the unfortunate happend. I drifted wide in the turn and sat up (BIG MISTAKE) thus causing the bike to drift wide and the front end to wash out in the leaves. Yep you guessed it I laid the bike on its side and my youngest daughter and I hit the pavement. Fourtunately we were going slow enough that neither of us was hurt, except my pride, a little road rash and some tears, but no torn clothes. After I got the little one settled down, came the fun part of trying to get the bike up right. Well after a little pulling and tuggin, I got the bike on solid ground and stood it right up. I am amazed how easy a wing is to right after being flopped on its side. Any way now I have a ridding partner who does not want to get back on the bike and ride with dad anymore and that hurts the most. How do you get my daughter to ride again to get over her fear and begin to enjoy riding again with dear ol dad?

Thanks
Rusty
 

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I think a motorcycle safety course is in order for you.
 

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I had a similar thing happen when my son was young. He didn't want to get back on after the accident and my healing(broken leg) even though he wasn't hurt. I forced him to ride and after a block or so he was all smiles. I worried afterward if I had done the wrong thing and it bothered me that I could have made a mistake. In my case it worked out,he now rides his own bike. I don't know if I would do it again,it was a risk.
 

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Give it some time... as much as she needs.
I agree with Goldwing Freak. If you force something on a child many times they end up dreading or completly hating whatever it was that you made them do. Just my .02
 

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You didn't mention how old your daughter is.

First: A child should not be a passenger on any bike until they can reach the passenger pegs/floorboards without stretching.

Second: Your precious cargo needs to be of an age and maturity that they understand the risks associated with motorcycling.

Third: You need to make sure that they are as well protected as they can be. A good fitting helmet, riding jacket, and protective shoes are a minimum.

I echo laen's comment - a safety course is in order. Mostly so you get your head in the right place but also to help you correct your mistake and bad habits.

If your daughter is old enough, you might want to sign her up for the MSF basic rider's course. Even if she doesn't pick up a motorcycling endorsement, she will better appreciate the mechanics of riding and what you are doing. She'll become a better co-rider.

Above all, don't force her to get back on the bike. When she does decide to join you for a ride, don't push it. Give her a nice, slow, short, safe ride. Then build up from there.
 

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tjshelton said:
You didn't mention how old your daughter is.

First: A child should not be a passenger on any bike until they can reach the passenger pegs/floorboards without stretching.

Second: Your precious cargo needs to be of an age and maturity that they understand the risks associated with motorcycling.

Third: You need to make sure that they are as well protected as they can be. A good fitting helmet, riding jacket, and protective shoes are a minimum.

I echo laen's comment - a safety course is in order. Mostly so you get your head in the right place but also to help you correct your mistake and bad habits.

If your daughter is old enough, you might want to sign her up for the MSF basic rider's course. Even if she doesn't pick up a motorcycling endorsement, she will better appreciate the mechanics of riding and what you are doing. She'll become a better co-rider.

Above all, don't force her to get back on the bike. When she does decide to join you for a ride, don't push it. Give her a nice, slow, short, safe ride. Then build up from there.
The quote above nails it
 

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RIDER

I have a 10 year old 87lb daughter that loves to ride and better yet actually likes to clean it up afterwards, anyway, let her come back to you and ask again, what made her want to go in the first place? try to re-open that thought. Get a safety course and that also will tell her your bettering your riding skills and give her more confedence. My daughter stood up at 70 mph on hwy one in santa barbara last week, and put her arms out and was pretending to fly. I pulled over and we had a 20 min. talk about motorcycle safety, very scary and dumb, but were both better for the experience. Treat you daughter with love and respect for motorcycling and your buddy will behind you again. kev
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have taken the MSF course but as everyone on this board knows the course is good but is not real life (even the instructor point this fact out). Not to mention that is why these things are called accidents, I did not mean to have the front end wash out.

My daughter is 8 yrs old and understands that motorcycling is fun and enjoyable, but also can be very dangerous even deadly at times.

She can reach the floor boards with no problem and has a helmit that properly fits and wears protective equipment. We had a long discussion about protective equipment when the wing was purchased.

I am hoping we will be able to enjoy riding together once again and that she will not give up something she has come to enjoy.
 
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Fear as in Child is something that takes time to over come.
Lots of patience and friendship will tell if it is meant to be again.

I remember as a kid of 4 years old I was in a car accident with my
brother and mother. We rolled over in a ditch with know injuries, but
for months, I was scared to ride in any vehicle.

Good Luck
 

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Trapshooter said:
... I am hoping we will be able to enjoy riding together once again and that she will not give up something she has come to enjoy.
1.) Make sure she understands you KNOW what went wrong and you're taking steps to make sure it doesn't happen again. Make sure you apologize to her and ask her to forgive you for the mishap.

2.) Give her a bit of time to recover from her scare.

3.) Perhaps she has taken some spills herself learning to ride a bicycle? ... learning to walk? Remind her that the best thing to do is to correct the problem and then start out again... real slow! :wink:

I'm sure things will work out fine for the two of you. You fall down, get up, brush yourself off, try again! :wink:
 

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Rusty, the best thing is time. After my accident my little girl didn't want to ride for awhile either. One day we were going to go out and eat and asked her if we could take the bikes and she said ok. We went slow, stayed away from traffic, before I knew it, she was back to asking for a ride all the time. It just takes time, hang in there and give her lots of hugs.

Jerry
 

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Trapshooter said:
I have taken the MSF course but as everyone on this board knows the course is good but is not real life (even the instructor point this fact out). Not to mention that is why these things are called accidents, I did not mean to have the front end wash out.
The MSF course isn't meant to make you a master rider. Rather, it is an opportunity for you to practice your riding in a controlled environment, under the watchful eye of a rider coach. Yes, it is all slow speed and not really representative of road riding, but they can still point out mistakes that you are making. I also mentioned "getting your head together." When someone has an accident, it is normal to feel a little apprehensive. Taking a safety course can help. Think of it as therapy. If you don't want to go the MSF route, there are all kinds of safety courses out there (www.streetmasters.info for one) that specialize in road riding.

My daughter is 8 yrs old and understands that motorcycling is fun and enjoyable, but also can be very dangerous even deadly at times.
I don't think I've ever met an 8-year-old with the maturity necessary to comprehend the dangers. But, as her dad, you know her much better than I do and I'll defer to your judgement.

She can reach the floor boards with no problem and has a helmit that properly fits and wears protective equipment. We had a long discussion about protective equipment when the wing was purchased.
Fitting on the bike and having the right safety gear is very important. Good on ya! I certainly hope that you are setting a good example by wearing all the right stuff as well.

I am hoping we will be able to enjoy riding together once again and that she will not give up something she has come to enjoy.
Riding can be a tremendous joy and can really bring a family together. My earlier comments were not intended to be judgmental. I was trying to express my concerns and hope that you were not offended. Give her some time and don't force the issue. It might take awhile, but it will be worth the wait. You want her riding to be a joyful memory, not a fearful one.
 

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Maybe let her know that you made a mistake and that just as you taught her to learn from her mistakes Dad did to and you will be so happy to take her for a ride when she is ready. Glad you are O.K.
 

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tjshelton said:
If your daughter is old enough, you might want to sign her up for the MSF basic rider's course. Even if she doesn't pick up a motorcycling endorsement, she will better appreciate the mechanics of riding and what you are doing. She'll become a better co-rider.
Then why not have her be a co-rider with Dad on the ERC?
 

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I had a bad accident in 1998 with my 12 year son on the back. I had severe injuries but fortunately my son's injuries were minor. I didn't ride for months due to my injuries but when I did I was terrified but I forced myself to get past it. My son however did not want to ride and I didn't force him. Two years later he asked to go for a ride and we have now taken several rides together, some very long extended trips. My advice is give her time but I would think every child is different.
 

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Re: RIDER

KEVBRU said:
....... anyway, let her come back to you and ask again, what made her want to go in the first place? try to re-open that thought. Get a safety course and that also will tell her your bettering your riding skills and give her more confedence. My daughter stood up at 70 mph on hwy one in santa barbara last week, and put her arms out and was pretending to fly. I pulled over and we had a 20 min. talk about motorcycle safety, very scary and dumb, but were both better for the experience. Treat you daughter with love and respect for motorcycling and your buddy will behind you again. kev
Kev is spot on... I'd also ask her gently each time you go out but don't push it.. When you return tell her how much you wished she had come.. Again, don't make a big deal out of it and she'll come around in her own time..

As for the MSF course, TJ is right that it's an oportunity to practice physical skills, but it's just as much about being alert and having the right mindset to ride safely and forsee the unfolding chain of events that contrbute to a crash!! I'm reminded each class I coach of these things and can see how it can be forgotten over time..

Enjoy, and hopes that you get your riding partner back soon!!
 

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Just be patient, hard as that may be.

I'm guessing you are feeling a little guilty because of the get-off and want to get her back aboard to show her everything is OK. I say this because that's exactly the way I would feel if this had happened to me.

Give her some time, let her know you still love her no matter what (which I'm sure you are already doing) and I bet she'll be back quickly.

God bless you and you daughter.


Bob E.
 
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It might help to get her up on the seat when the bike is parked, have her help you clean it, show her how to check the tires, oil and lights.
If you can rekindle her interest with slow gradient steps she will likely loose her fear to proving to dad she is grown up enough to try again.
But don't force it, let it come in her own time. JMHO

Pat
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Tom,

I did not take offense to any comments that have been made on this board. I am a not new to riding but have taken a few years off so I am re learning to ride. My daughter Bailey and I have talked a lot over the last several days about "Our" incident. This morning when the sun came out and it was time to go to Grandma's house (before going to school) she asked if we could ride the wing. It seems that kids are willing to forgive but not forget. I as dropped her off at Grandma's house she gave me a hug and a kiss and told me to call her when I got to work so she would know I made it safely.

Now she wants me to pick her up after school and to go for a ride tonight. The only thing she asked was no sharp turns with leave around. I am seeing a nice ride throught the country with one of my three favorite passengers.

Thanks for all you advice and support.
Rusty
 
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