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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone! Had a knee replacement in late December, rehab is going well. Had a couple of complications, but that's past now.
Tuesday my doc will release me to ride, but I am feeling leery. Trying to figure out how to tell when I am actually ready to ride.

Any advice from fellow riders who have been through this?
Thanks!
 

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I had my right knee replaced Nov 13th but since it's winter up here no riding, although I did ride in the trailer when we moved, had some trouble get it over the seat getting on and off otherwise felt fine when on the bike. Good luck
 

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Hi everyone! Had a knee replacement in late December, rehab is going well. Had a couple of complications, but that's past now.
Tuesday my doc will release me to ride, but I am feeling leery. Trying to figure out how to tell when I am actually ready to ride.

Any advice from fellow riders who have been through this?
Thanks!
I had my L knee replacement on Apr 24, 2019. My Dr. said NO to therapy since I take blood thinner Warfarin. I am now strong and almost done with the swelling. I do ride my Suzuki Burgman 650 and enjoy it. I will soon be riding my big bike BMW K1600GTL. It is 200 # lighter than my '03 GL1800 but feels heavier, with its higher center of gravity. I take nothing for granted, at 77 I'm still not mature. Hoping to make my 5th parachute jump soon! The best to you, safe always.
 

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I had both knees replaced two years ago. I set two goals before I rode again: Getting the bike up on the center stand and being able to pick up the bike alone after being laid on it's side. Took me 3 months after surgery to accomplish those two things. I probably could have ridden the wing after 10 weeks.
BTW, the knee replacements were the best thing I've ever done.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I set two goals before I rode again: Getting the bike up on the center stand and being able to pick up the bike alone after being laid on it's side.
I think that's what's bothering me. My new knee works different than me REALLY bad old knee did, so the chance of dropping it is greater while learning how my new knee works.

I had developed all kinds of work-arounds with my old knee, and knew what I could do and what I couldn't. Most of the issues are mental, working through what I can do that I couldn't before, and learning where the limits of my new knee are.
Its been 6 weeks, but a bout of sciatica, plus inflammation of my hamstring attachment put me about 2 weeks behind. Then a slip and fall on black ice put me back about another week.
 

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While I have not had a new bionic knee I have recently been in our local Intensive Care at the hospital for a number of days.
Some serious days indeed.
The best advice somebody gave me was not to cheap out and cheat on the post release advice once released.
4 weeks on the gains are substantial..
Talk about better, stronger and faster.
Yippee Ki Eh. Kia Kaha.
 

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I had both knees done at the same time about 4 years ago. I was back on the bike for the first time at 8 weeks exactly, with my doctor's blessing. However, my recovery and therapy went about as well as anyone could hope for. Everyone will be different. If you had setbacks, then you should probably hold off longer than others.

My first time was nervous too. I really wasn't 100% sure, but you never really are. I even wore a heavy metal hinged brace on one of my knees that first ride because the right knee still felt loose. I needed it for my confidence. But I was fine.

Picking up a dropped bike is another thing. You really aren't fully healed until about 1 year.

Every doctor has their own beliefs on when it's time to get on with your life. Some are very conservative. Some, like mine, insist on getting back into a normal routine as soon as possible. Regardless of what anyone says here, do what the doc says. If the problem is you and your confidence, try doing other things first in order to convince yourself that you are ready.

Good luck.
 

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Hi everyone! Had a knee replacement in late December, rehab is going well. Had a couple of complications, but that's past now.
Tuesday my doc will release me to ride, but I am feeling leery. Trying to figure out how to tell when I am actually ready to ride.

Any advice from fellow riders who have been through this?
Thanks!
Regarding picking up the dropped bike that others mentioned: Go to Youtube and look for the Aruba Motorcycle police videos. They show a completely different way to pick up a downed bike. They call it the MEYE LIFT. It's a Handlebar lifting with your weight pushing into the bike from a standing position facing the bike. Totally diffeent from the traditional way we have been taught .

Check it out. It looks a lot less taxing on your knees and legs and back. And NO, I have not done it myself.
 

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I did not have knee surgery, BUT I had a full blown seizure, two years ago (Uncle John helped save my life) Doctor claimed that because I lost so much Oxygen, That I was going to be a vegetable, and never ride/walk again.......Well I'm back! I walk 4 - 5 miles a day,(or more) joined a exercise class, and work out two/three times a week... and triked out my bike ... ( it's been in hibernation now since late Oct.) but once it warms up a bit, I'll be back out riding like a trooper..... Oh yea, during the winter months, I go snow skiing (I'm now retired) all over the US, I just got back from a ski trip at Steamboat Springs Colorado two weeks ago, and going again to Vermont tomorrow ......................... * think snow*

Ronnie
 

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Interesting to read all the comments on this thread. Ismhaving a total knee replacement on 2-18-2020. I am not apprehensive about the surgery. Anything will be better than the bone in bone I have now. As with the responses here I have talked to many who have had the surgery done, reviews range from a “piece of cake”
to “I thought I was going to die”. I think a lot depends on the patient’s pain threshold and the desire to do the proscribed therapy. I hope to feel confident to ride in 4-6 weeks.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Anything will be better than the bone in bone I have now.
Hi Al.
I am not finished recovering and had a tough recovery and I'm already glad I had it done. The constant ache is gone, the pain is gone for the first time in 20 years. I'm already doing things I could not do with my old knee.
 

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When I had my right knee replaced in 2010, one of the most comforting things my surgeon told me was that my new knee will be much stronger than the old knee. Knowing this, my concern over putting the bike onto the center stand or picking it up simply vanished.

A word to the wise - do ALL the rehab without slacking one bit! A proper rehab will ensure your knee heals properly and completely.

10 weeks after my surgery, and two after being released to full duty as an LEO, I was on the scooter for a fun 10 day trip from the central mountains of Arizona to Wisconsin and back. The only suggestion from my surgeon? Take one Bufferin a day to keep the blood flow going into the new joint.

- David
 

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Hi everyone! Had a knee replacement in late December, rehab is going well. Had a couple of complications, but that's past now.
Tuesday my doc will release me to ride, but I am feeling leery. Trying to figure out how to tell when I am actually ready to ride.

Any advice from fellow riders who have been through this?
Thanks!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Follow your doctors orders and use good common sense.

Comments from others may (or may not) apply. Everyone heals and recovers differently at their own pace.....!!
 

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Regarding picking up the dropped bike that others mentioned: Go to Youtube and look for the Aruba Motorcycle police videos. They show a completely different way to pick up a downed bike. They call it the MEYE LIFT. It's a Handlebar lifting with your weight pushing into the bike from a standing position facing the bike. Totally diffeent from the traditional way we have been taught .

Check it out. It looks a lot less taxing on your knees and legs and back. And NO, I have not done it myself.
 

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Interesting to read all the comments on this thread. Ismhaving a total knee replacement on 2-18-2020. I am not apprehensive about the surgery. Anything will be better than the bone in bone I have now. As with the responses here I have talked to many who have had the surgery done, reviews range from a “piece of cake”
to “I thought I was going to die”. I think a lot depends on the patient’s pain threshold and the desire to do the proscribed therapy. I hope to feel confident to ride in 4-6 weeks.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
If you are having just one knee done, that is a good goal. If both knees, it's too optimistic. Two knees is a whole different ballgame, with its own unique problems.

Knee replacement today is an example of the wonders of medicine. When you think about it, they are going to take your leg apart, drill it, saw it, remove some things, and put it back together with new parts. And then, 3 hours after you are in your room, the doc will come in and have you stand up on both feet. Amazing.

You will be starting rehab almost immediately. There will be some constant pain, but it is manageable. Most people are not in constant agony. The only really painful part is the range of motion exercises, and it is the most important part. It's bad, but short lived. I had already had 3 knee surgeries over the years, so I already knew what to expect. You only have x amount of weeks to get as much ROM back as possible, and then whatever you have is permanent. You can't come back 6 months later and try to improve it, so do your rehab with a sense of urgency. (within reason of course) You will have to push yourself to stretch the joint beyond what feels possible. It will feel like you will break something if you push any harder. Don't grimace and grunt to the therapist. He or she won't give you any sympathy. They see it every day. Women therapists are the worst. (Sorry ladies.) Maybe it's just because we expect them to be pushovers and think we can sweet talk them into being easy on us. They aren't and won't.

You will go through a lot of emotions. Progress will seem to be going great, seeing improvement each day, and then you will hit a brick wall where it seems like you have hit your limit. Depression will kick in. Take a day or two off from therapy if it gets to be too much. It won't hurt your progress as long as you get back to it quickly. Use the time off to refocus your determination to overcome the limitations.

While you are recovering, don't lose sight of the fact that Hospitals and home health care companies are there to make money. They will likely keep setting up appointments and milk it for as long as the insurance pays them and you let them, even when you no longer need them. My insurance paid for home health care. I had a nurse coming out 2-3 times a week, and had to tell her when I didn't need help any more. They serve an important service in the beginning, but eventually they are just doing things you can do yourself. That's great if you are truly helpless. I'm not. Same with the therapy. There came a point where I knew I could do the stretching and exercising on my own, and stopped the appointments. I hated to do it. She was really cute. If the support of a therapist helps you, then keep going with it. But know when it is time to end it. You can always restart if you find yourself falling behind.

I almost forgot one thing. DVT (blood clots), and infection. It is one of the few serious risks with joint replacement. Every hospital and surgeon has there own methods to deal with it, but follow their orders to the letter and know how to recognize the symptoms. It is rare, but you don't want to be a statistic.
 

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I didn't have any problem with my left knee replacement a few years ago. The right knee replacement, a year and a half old now, is stiffer and gives me two problems: getting my right leg over the bike while mounting and dismounting, and bending enough for my right foot to ride securely on the footpeg. I keep working at it because I'm in no way ready to quit riding. The footpeg issue is less of a problem when I wear motorcycle boots, which seem to stick better to the rubber on the peg. The footpeg problem made it hard to use the foot brake, which I fixed by putting a larger brake pedal cover over the stock one and lowering it one notch.
 

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While you are recovering, don't lose sight of the fact that Hospitals and home health care companies are there to make money. They will likely keep setting up appointments and milk it for as long as the insurance pays them and you let them, even when you no longer need them. My insurance paid for home health care. I had a nurse coming out 2-3 times a week, and had to tell her when I didn't need help any more. They serve an important service in the beginning, but eventually they are just doing things you can do yourself. That's great if you are truly helpless. I'm not. Same with the therapy. There came a point where I knew I could do the stretching and exercising on my own, and stopped the appointments. I hated to do it. She was really cute. If the support of a therapist helps you, then keep going with it. But know when it is time to end it. You can always restart if you find yourself falling behind.
That sure is true when I was recovering from a left collis fracture (broken left wrist). Tricare authorized 30 visits and I think the therapist knew that and kept calling. Their office was pretty far from both my work and home and I still had to do $30 copay every time. I learned a few things from them initially but I have pretty good self discipline and never made any more appointments after I got the routine down. I even rode the Wing to my last visit. A lot of the exercises involved a hammer and some in my office as well as visitors said they felt intimidated but I'm probably 95% back to normal and I can even do push ups now.

I'm lucky in the knee department and can still jog 3 miles at a 12 min/mile pace but I would not try much more distance than that anymore. 56 years old BTW.
 

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Hi everyone! Had a knee replacement in late December, rehab is going well. Had a couple of complications, but that's past now.
Tuesday my doc will release me to ride, but I am feeling leery. Trying to figure out how to tell when I am actually ready to ride.

Any advice from fellow riders who have been through this?
Thanks!
I had my right knee replaced Dec 19th. 4 weeks after, I was able to lift my leg high enough to set on the bike. I would stand up the bike and shift the weight back and forth. I did this for 3 weeks.
At 7 weeks I rode the bike around our subdivision. The next day I rode it about 20 miles. I had a little bit of pain under my knee cap but if I stretched it out to the hwy pegs, all was good. Right now I can go on short rides. Longer rides will be when it warms up more.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks brother. This helps.
Mine was Dec 17th, but the tourniquet pinched my sciatic nerve and the hamstring attachment to the pelvis (9/10 pain and lots of narcotics for two weeks), so the first 3.5 weeks of PT was rehabing that before we could push the knee. I've made up time since then, but am still working to get hip and hamstring flexibility back.

I have been getting on the Wing and balancing it, but getting on and off the Ducati is very challenging. I can do it in jeans, but not with my Roadcrafter on. There's just a bit too much resistance.
I'll get there.....

I had my right knee replaced Dec 19th. 4 weeks after, I was able to lift my leg high enough to set on the bike. I would stand up the bike and shift the weight back and forth. I did this for 3 weeks.
At 7 weeks I rode the bike around our subdivision. The next day I rode it about 20 miles. I had a little bit of pain under my knee cap but if I stretched it out to the hwy pegs, all was good. Right now I can go on short rides. Longer rides will be when it warms up more.
 

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I had a double knee replacement back about 12 years ago, and I should have it done sooner than I did. Rehab was tough but I stuck with it. To be honest, I have never fully regained the ROM that I had prior to having the prosthetic knees, but I can live a full life, including riding a motorcycle and walking as much as I please to do (typically about 2.7 miles in about an hour when the weather is good and an hour's stationary bike ride at the gym during the winter months). Now, many years later I still struggle a bit with swinging my leg over the bike and getting off again, but once on the bike I am totally fine with all day riding. But after my knee replacement surgery, I found that getting on and off my ride at that time, a Kawa Concours, was just too much for me. I traded it in for a Honda Silverwing, a step through maxi scooter and used that for about two years before returning to a "real" motorcycle. FWIW, that Silverwing was every bit as capable, and in some ways more so, than most motorcycles that I have owned. Getting on and off, and the "kitchen chair" seating position as really, really comfortable. Not having to shift was not a hardship and I got used to the ease of riding the scooter pretty quickly, once I learned to stop reaching for the clutch lever. But I never got over the desire to get a real motorcycle, with bigger wheels and the sound and feel of a real bike. Now, all these years later, the prosthetic knees are of little or no concern in my daily living and riding, but I will consider getting my next bike as one without a trunk or high back passenger seat so that swinging a leg over will be much easier to do, or likely just getting a smaller and lighter bike altogether.
 
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