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So does anyone know if the three cylinder Spyder’s come from the factory equipped with tire pressure monitors ? Seems like along with all the other modern technology they have they would have tire pressure monitors but neither of the riders had any idea so maybe they don’t .
 

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Mine is 2017 and no tyre pressure monitoring. They were updated for 2018, new dash, audio etc. but with teething trouble similar to the new Wing. No idea whether tyre pressure monitoring was added.
 

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I bought the Wing because of the airbag. When the time comes for a trike, I'll just trike the bike I have.

I will have to use a rear trike to preserve the function of the airbag. I would prefer a front trike like an Endeavor, but that will not be possible with the airbag.

I've ridden a Can Am. I am sure I could get used to it, but I'm also sure the smoothness, reliability and safety (airbag) would be nothing like a quality Goldwing rear trike conversion. They shimmy at certain speeds due to an oscillation of the drive belt. By the time I'm ready I hope there will be a way to preserve the ABS function.
 

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I took MSF course on a Spyder and I found the power steering twitchy, as someone said. I also like the reverse gear in the Spyder, but I didn't really ride it that long in order to say I liked it. That said, I have over 22,000 miles on my Endeavor reverse triked 2010 Goldwing, but I believe it handles better on the road than the Spyder. JMHO
 

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jspringator: I do not see how a front conversion like mine (Hannigan HRT) would effect the air bag, as nothing but the front wheel and forks are removed and replaced with conversion. The main body or frame are not modified in any way.
 

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Was out riding yesterday and got to talking to a lady with a Spyder attempting to put air in the rear tire, I asked how much air it was supposed to have but she didn’t know and didn’t have a gauge. So got my gauge out and checked it had 27 pounds and the center of the tire was worn out with only 10,000 miles on it. Some guy driving a car comes over and says he also owns a identical 2015 Spyder, so I ask him how much air the rear tire is supposed to have and he says he doesn’t know because the tire shop takes care of his tires . I asked if the Spyder was equipped with a tire pressure monitor but neither one of them knew.


Can-Am says that 25% of Spyder purchasers have no prior on-road riding experience, and that 25% of them are women.

That's what scares me about buying a used Can Am Spyder. Ride it and not perform any of the maintenance. See too many for sale with only 5K miles on them.
 

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I bought the Wing because of the airbag. When the time comes for a trike, I'll just trike the bike I have.

I will have to use a rear trike to preserve the function of the airbag. I would prefer a front trike like an Endeavor, but that will not be possible with the airbag.

I've ridden a Can Am. I am sure I could get used to it, but I'm also sure the smoothness, reliability and safety (airbag) would be nothing like a quality Goldwing rear trike conversion. They shimmy at certain speeds due to an oscillation of the drive belt. By the time I'm ready I hope there will be a way to preserve the ABS function.

JS,


The California Sidecar rear-wheel Goldwing trike does maintain the factory ABS - one of my reasons for currently preferring this trike kit. I am unsure whether the others maintain the factory ABS.


The CSS actually maintains most of the factory bells and whistles (re: trunk warning for open door, low fuel light, even with auxiliary fuel tank, etc.). :nerd:
 

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JS,


The California Sidecar rear-wheel Goldwing trike does maintain the factory ABS - one of my reasons for currently preferring this trike kit. I am unsure whether the others maintain the factory ABS.


The CSS actually maintains most of the factory bells and whistles (re: trunk warning for open door, low fuel light, even with auxiliary fuel tank, etc.). :nerd:
Yes, CSC maintains the factory linked brakes, ABS, rear suspension adjustment control and upper/lower trunk latches (it uses the right saddlebag latch for the new bottom trunk) and the aux fuel tank is gravity fed so the stock fuel gauge still reads total fill volume. The only difference is my low fuel light now comes on after 7.3 gallons are consumed so I have, in effect, a 3 gallon "reserve" good for about 90-100 miles.
 

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Good reserve for places like western Canada and Alaska. I would not be so worried looking for fuel with about 100 miles left; although, I probably would never get to that point.
 

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Did anyone mention the 3-4 main computers in the Spyders?
The cheapest one is $800.00, and when I test drove one a couple years ago there was no extended warranty available.
 

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I have a group trip coming up in 2 weeks. We have 5 couples all pulling trailers.
1 Goldwing Hannigan Trike
1 CanAm Spyder
1 Harley Trike
1 Goldwing 2 wheeler
1 Harley 2 wheeler

I'll try to provide feedback when we get back.
 

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I have a group trip coming up in 2 weeks. We have 5 couples all pulling trailers.
1 Goldwing Hannigan Trike
1 CanAm Spyder
1 Harley Trike
1 Goldwing 2 wheeler
1 Harley 2 wheeler

I'll try to provide feedback when we get back.
Curious minds would like to know......where will this trip be headed?
 

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Discussion Starter #35 (Edited)
OP here.

Just wanted to thank everyone for chiming in with their experience on this question.

Won't be long, now that I'm 70, that I'll be looking for an "extra wheel".

I've also test ridden a Tilting Motor Works (TMW) "Trio" tilting front trike conversion. If they get the firmware on that system that controls the locking and unlocking of the front suspension sorted out, it would be the way to go. You can't really tell at all that you are on a trike when riding at speeds above 7MPH when the front end is not locked and leveled. Bike handles and leans just like a 2-wheeler. Pretty amazing design, actually. The issue is that the logic that controls lockup and release at speeds under 7 MPH is so complex that the human brain cannot keep up with it. As a result it's hard to know if you should be counter steering (2-wheel steering) or trike steering (3-wheel steering) at any particular moment when below 7 MPH! Not good, since those are exact opposites of one another.

Thanks again for your replies!
 

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Curious minds would like to know......where will this trip be headed?
Seattle south along Hwy 101 - Oregon Coast to California Hwy 1
South to San Simeon, then East to Sequoia, Kings Canyon & Yosemite NP
then North to Lake Tahoe, Reno, Bend OR
Around the back side of Mt Rainier, WA then home.

Should be a nice variety of terrain to compare bike performance.
 

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Sounds like a great route with a variety of scenery. Enjoy and have a safe trip. :thumbup:
 

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Bike Comparison Trip Report

Back from the trip, just under 3,000 miles.
(1 GW 2 wheeler, 1 Harley 2 wheeler, 1 Can-Am Spyder, 1 Harley Trike & 1 Goldwing Trike, all pulling trailers loaded for 2 weeks)

HANDLING IN CURVES
Lots of twisty roads on the coast route (CA-1). Of course, the 2 wheelers had the most fun. Much more work for the 3 wheelers.
The Can-Am said he will invest in a sturdier anti-swaybar as he experienced enough sway in the twisties to make him decide on taking another route half way down the coast.
I was a bit more aggressive and my GW Trike got hot when we were climbing twisty hills, mostly due to slow speeds (stuck behind the Harleys) and high RPMs.
When I was in front, I could go faster and it seemed to help hold the temp down. Keep in mind, we were all pulling loaded trailers.

PULL-OUTS
Throughout the trip, there were many spots where we pulled over to enjoy the view. Not all were paved and of course, the 3 wheelers had no problems with that. 2 wheelers didn't do as well in the gravel.

HIGHWAY DRIVING
All bikes rode and handled well going on flat, straight roads. All our wives were comfortable riding back seat, although some complained about visibility (fat heads blocking forward view).
The Harley's seem to take longer to pass vehicles than the GW's or Can-Am. This may be due to riding styles as our Harley drivers are a bit more laid back then the rest of us.
When stopped at construction zones & stop-n-go traffic, the 3 wheelers had an easier time than the 2 wheelers.

As mentioned in earlier posts, the Can-Am has a better reverse. All of us had occasion where we needed to back out of our spots. Can-Am did quickly and easily, GW's did so slowly, Harley Trike had reverse, but sounded terrible and Harley 2-wheeler had wife pushing, but she didn't sound as bad.

Although the trip was fantastic, all us 3 wheelers wished we could have done it a few years ago when we had our 2 wheelers. Would have been much more fun.
I don't regret making the switch to 3 wheels. It was a good time to do so and it will allow me to ride for many more years..... but probably on roads that are a bit straighter.
 

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Despite a couple of minor problems it sounds as if all of you had a good time. :thumbup:
 
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