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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.gl1800riders.com/forums/view ... c&start=50
Because of the thread above, I have to ask...
What do you use the GPS for?
How does it help your trip/journey?
Why do some say that they can't live without it?
I thought it was an electronic map. Am I mistaken?
Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I'm assuming from the amount of viewers and lack of responses, that I've either stumped all of you or you simply don't think I'm asking valid questions.
My background;
I've never seen a GPS in operation.
I've never looked into GPS as a viable aid in driving.
I do think it can be very helpful if you do as I and venture out into the wilderness on foot and off the beaten path i.e. stay off any trails. in such areas as Tahoe's surrounding wilderness and West Oregon. But have not needed any such device as of yet.

O.K. Is there anything I am missing?
What else can it do besides tell you where you are at and where your intended destination is?
Thank you.
 

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Okay, Nedro, I'll bite.

It'a a map...............a map that's always on the right page.

I don't let it guide me to places. I don't let it bitch me out for taking wrong turns.

I use it to stay on course, calculate altitude, and generally keep a perspective of my heading and the surrounding area.

What I've used it mostly for is to keep me from missing a turn in some little town where the signs have grown over with shrubs and vines and everyone there already knows where they are. I travel back roads and enjoy a trip back into the 50's but some of those highways will take you right through old residential neighborhoods with 5 or 6 turns in 5 or 6 blocks. Helps me to stay on my already decided track.

Besides that, it's just a fun toy which I marvel at every time I turn it on.

I can certainly understand where others might get much more use out of a gps. I know if I lived in a large city, I'd activate the traffic info from XM and let it steer me clear of congestion. If I was retired and spent more time on the bike, I'd get one of the weather radar capable units and pay the $30 per month to avoid storms.

Just my thoughts. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks!
I'm trying to form an opinion, so there's no, "Gotcha", in my inquiry.
The only thing I thought it would be great for is for fishing. Even with triangulation, it's hard to get to the exact place on a large lake one year later. I thought it would work good for that.
 

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nedro said:
I'm assuming from the amount of viewers and lack of responses, that I've either stumped all of you or you simply don't think I'm asking valid questions.
Maybe there could be a third option...

But more to your questions:

What do you use the GPS for?
Listen to music, check time and temp, watch the radar for upcoming storms...those kinds of things.

How does it help your trip/journey?
I prefer to ride at night and appreciate the ability to see the layout of the road ahead especially in those areas that I've never ridden.

Why do some say that they can't live without it?
I can't answer for others...

I thought it was an electronic map. Am I mistaken?
Not sure what you're asking with this one...
 

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The coolest thing we use ours for is when we get to a big city, me being from the country, you can put in an address and it will find what you want and if you are looking for a hotel you can get it to list all the hotels and ours even has the ph numbers so you can call and find a room instead of riding from hotel to hotel. It is also handy if you don't know the area but are hungry for a certain type of food it will find all of the restaurants with that type. (It may also have the DQ"s listed) :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You listen to music on your GPS?


Electronic map. as in; I thought a GPS gives you your coordinates as it pertains to the Earth.
 

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I am a bone head with directions.

I can't remember more than two turns at a time, and I usually get one of them wrong.

Kind of like having your own personal traffic cop, welcome/information center in your vehicle with you.

Allows me to venture out in places that scare the chit out of me (Large Cities).

Bulldog
 

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nedro said:
You listen to music on your GPS?


Electronic map. as in; I thought a GPS gives you your coordinates as it pertains to the Earth.
It will give you your coordinates if you want them, but that's secondary. It shows you on a little road map as an arrow. As you travel, it shows you moving on the map and it shows the roads/streets coming up.

You sure you're not pulling our legs?
 

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Nedro, maybe you could review some of the videos I just posted and see how some of the more-commonly used functions are used?

I like being able to use it to plan a long trip, review the POI data for the destination (hotels, food, etc.), to get lost and know I can always find the way home, to be able to go to an unfamiliar place and quickly find a seafood restaurant, steak house, drug store, hospital, etc, to find the nearest gas station when I'm on a lonely stretch of road and nearing 'E', etc, etc, etc.

I also use mine to listen to my music while on the road.

It's not like I couldn't enjoy riding without one, but it does add to my riding enjoyment (especially on the longer trips)
 

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When I take a vacation I never make concrete plans. I know where I'm going in general, but I never know where I will be staying most nights of my vacation. I ride all day until I feel like finding a hotel for the night. I pull over and hit the find button on the GPS and it gives me a list of the hotels within say 20 miles from where I'm at. I then call the hotels on my cell phone and when I happy with one of the choices, I hit the "take me to it" button and the GPS takes me to the hotel. Once I get settled in the hotel and I want to eat, I hit the find button on the GPS and it brings up all the restaurant's in the area and again the GPS takes me to it. After dinner and I want to ride around the strange town I have never been to before, the GPS will take me back to the hotel when it's dark and I can't quite remember how to get back to it.

Need to find a post office, a Landry mat to wash your clothes, a drug store, a gas station when your out on back roads, or maybe a ATM machine, it's all in the GPS data base.
 

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My GPS is a very old Garmin Streetpilot ... it does not talk or play music. It does serve as a map ... and I can zoom in to 200 feet or out to the entire U.S. My GPS has a limited memory ... but then so do I :lol: The coolest thing I like about it is that I know exactly how far I went ... how fast ... how high ... and my entire route ... when the ride is done and I'm back home. The Streetpilot keeps a "breadcrumb" trail along roads I've covered.

Unlike many others, I don't use it to find my way as much as to record my trip.

It's a perfect compass for the 'Wing, a bike that's almost impossible to put a compass on. And it is an absolutely exact clock!

Mine sits on a RAM mount over the front brake reservour on the right and is a dandy place to hang my helmet when I get off the bike. The helmet thus hides the GPS from possible theft.

It only cost $100 used, the original owner bought a new fangled color unit that talks to him.

Here's a picture of it as we were crossing the Mackinaw Bridge ... http://soliddesign.net/~tom/Vacation200 ... age14.html
 

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I like to ride long distance but I hate interstate. Many of my long distance trips are on back roads with turns onto other highways and backroads every 15 or 20 miles. These rides go through areas I've never been, and it sucks having to stop every 75 miles or so to have to check the maps to see where my next turn is. I never even look at my GPS, I simply let it talk to me.

I took a trip this past summer that was 5500 miles through states and terrain I never heard of. I sat in front of my computer and used Streets & Trips for a couple of days to come up with a unique and thrilling route. Then I spent a couple of hours getting it all into my GPS. The morning we took off was the last time I opened a map on the whole trip (although I did take an Atlas with me just in case). The GPS guided us down every road, every turn, and even found a couple of restaurants for us while we were staying in hotels.

The first couple of years I had the GPS I would intentionally go out for rides on roads and in directions I had never contemplated, leaving the GPS off. About 2 hours before I needed to be home, even though I was in areas that had me questioning north from south, I would simply turn on my GPS and have it guide me back home. I learned about some incredible roads in my own back yard that way.

A GPS is like headsets on a motorcycle.... you never realize what its worth until you have it. My recommendation is to avoid buying one. Once you do, it becomes a requirement for every bike/car ride in your future.

If I never owned a GPS, I never would have discovered Power House Road near Visalia, CA. That find alone was worth every penny the GPS cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the replys.I'm not pulling anyones leg. I know that GPS gives you coordinants. I've seen the commercials for GMs "navstar/northstar?", so I've seen the arrows. But I've never actually looked at a working unit or even thought about what it can do for you (besides the fishing thing).
I think Roadie summed it up the best so far. And if I were retired, I think it would be a great tool (or even if I were on any sort of extended vacation). But for now, I tend to go online to get reservations at certain check points as I try to estimate how far I want to go in a day.
Again, I'm ignorant on the subject and appreciate the input.
 

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i have had a new low cost GPS for less than 3 weeks and have put on about 1,000 miles playing with it, pretty amazing tool most of the time, kind of disappointing sometimes
these days the GPS is a new and changing tool, in a few more years the cost should come down as the quallity goes up
 

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Nedro, last year at this time I was like you in that I new very little about GPS after reading on this forum and talking to some freinds I decided what the heck and bought one I figure at worst I could sell it at a loss if I didn't use it. I decided to buy a Garmin 2730 it has mp3 player, xm radio, some weather & traffic capability. The unit replaced my mp3 and xm. I use them all the time and the gps has been great for several trips this past summer. I set up points along the way to stop pick motels, and gas stops, food stops etc. It is very easy to operate and makes a trip more enjoyable for my wife and I takes all the guess work out of it.
It is also great for taking back roads I have been places within 40 miles of where I live that I never new were there. It's been alot of fun.
 

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Nedro, your questions are valid ones. If you never venture away from the areas and roads you know - even marginally - then you'll probably never get the full benefit of a GPS. In fact, I predict you would perceive it as an irritating nuisance; all the fiddling (good southern word) with the blasted thing just to show you what you already know.

OTOH, if you are a venturer and get into parts of the country you know very little of; off the main highways and into the "back country"; into a strange city or even a little-known neighborhood of the city you know best, I submit that a good GPS can be your best friend of the moment. I sure wish I had one in my rental car when I was lost in south Chicago several years ago... Bad part of town to be lost in at 2:00 AM!

Although I generally have a built-in sense of direction, I use my GPS to find business addresses in Memphis - and I've lived here since 1981! I business-travel with my handheld Garmin (a low-cost e-Trex) because I go to many cities that I am not familiar with. I have built-in GPS in both my Ridgeline and Maxima and they are critically valuable to me. I move my iWay between the Wing and the VTX, depending on my mood. When I take the boat out, I install the iWay in it (mostly to verify the speedometer).

As for listening to music on the GPS - yes, you can! - if you have one with a built-in MP3 player. I prefer audiobooks to recorded music on long road trips and, whether on the bike or in the cage, it makes the whole trip more interesting for me.

Good look hunting and finding!
 

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nedro said:
Thanks for the replys.I'm not pulling anyones leg. I know that GPS gives you coordinants. I've seen the commercials for GMs "navstar/northstar?", so I've seen the arrows. But I've never actually looked at a working unit or even thought about what it can do for you (besides the fishing thing).
I think Roadie summed it up the best so far. And if I were retired, I think it would be a great tool (or even if I were on any sort of extended vacation). But for now, I tend to go online to get reservations at certain check points as I try to estimate how far I want to go in a day.
Again, I'm ignorant on the subject and appreciate the input.
This would help for what you like to do, put in a city and it will show you the hotels in that city and you can pick the one on your route. When you get to that city it will tell you how to get there.
 

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I didn't read the entirety of every post so I do not know if this was brought up. I find it poor as a map. Too small, so if I want to study a route I use a road atlas, much easier. However, I do use it to get me back on track. I like to explore, and if in a strange city and lost I can simply ask it to re-route me from the present location or simply look and see where I have to go to get back on the original route. I also find it useful if scaled way down in the twisties. I can get some idea of what's next on an unfamiliar road. Other than that I do find it useful for strange addresses and as guide as to what's next and how long on the road.
 

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I use a hard copy map to see the bigger view, but use the routing in my GPS to find my way, in case I detour enroute to see something interesting, or am unsure of the area, which has been the case on my two long trips this year.

The best reason to use it, though, in my mind, is to know, for sure, how long to the next gas stop, the next restaurant, or the end of the day stop. This is especially true if I get disabled or in an accident. Having a good idea how far you are from the next stop, or the last stop, can help in signalling for help from emergency services. I haven't used it, but I feel better, especially when out in the middle of nowhere, or in unfamiliar territory. Also, I have found that my Garmin, if it says I'll be there at 5 PM, it is usually within a few minutes of 5 PM that I arrive. That is reassuring to me. After the last break of the day, I know I only have to stay in the saddle xx minutes...then I can enjoy a cold one.
 
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