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Discussion Starter #1
I took off my front wheel and am going to have the old tire remounted in an attemt to isolate whether the tire or something else is wrong. No vibration when I had the old front tire on. I figure if the old one does not vibrate then my new front is bad. If the old one does, then I will look at the wheel bearings as stated in my previous threads.

On my C14 it was recommended to lube the front axle. I do not see mention of it on the Wing. I did lightly lube the fat part of the axle to aid in it sliding in to the alignmet mark.

Do I lube or not? Feels like it had a light film of lube.
 

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Yes, put a light film grease on it. I use brake grease, but just about anything will do. The grease doesn't serve any purpose while riding. But it does keep the axle from rusting, and makes it easier to remove when servicing.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What I thought also. Fixing to put it together and hopefully vibration is gone.
 

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:agree:
Yes, put a light film grease on it. I use brake grease, but just about anything will do. The grease doesn't serve any purpose while riding. But it does keep the axle from rusting, and makes it easier to remove when servicing.
 

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Brake Grease???
 

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Brake Grease???
Yes, HiTemp brake grease. It is used to lube caliper pins and sliders. You should be using some each time the pads are replaced.
 

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Yes, HiTemp brake grease. It is used to lube caliper pins and sliders. You should be using some each time the pads are replaced.
Yeah, OK. Thanks for clearing that up.

I understand that the caliper needs to be able to move freely, laterally. If it couldn't, the pad opposite of the piston pad, would not be applied with equal force against the rotor. This would cause insufficient braking, unequal pad wear, excessive pedal travel, maybe even some squealing....

Quite the oxymoron though, Brake Grease, sheesh, someone somewhere, is gonna be smearing that stuff all over their rotors.... Hope not.

Oh, and I agree, a very light coating of grease on the axle wouldn't hurt. Good luck finding the cause of that vibration.
 

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Oh Yeah. It's all the rage nowadays. Smearing a little grease on your rotors is guaranteed to stop squealing problems. It does have a few minor drawbacks however.;)

Avoid using anything other than high temp brake grease on your caliper slides and contact points. Other greases will quickly burn off from the heat, leaving the slides dry. I put some on the back sides of the pads as well. It dampens oscillations, which helps prevent pads from squealing.
 

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Honda recommends no lube on the front axle pin. When I remove them and find grease/oil on them, I wipe them dry before reinstalling them. The grease seals require lube.
 

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Honda recommends no lube on the front axle pin. When I remove them and find grease/oil on them, I wipe them dry before reinstalling them. The grease seals require lube.
Do they specifically say not to, or do they just not mention it?

it certainly isn't necessary for the proper operation of the bike. But I have always put a thin layer of grease on axles, and have never checked to see what the manuals say. Right or wrong, I hate having to drive out rusted axles with a pin punch and hammer. (and they do rust.)

If somebody can give me a good reason not to, I will certainly stop recommending it. I suppose a dry axle could be important for clamping purposes. I have never had a problem yet, but that doesn't make it right.
 

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Do they specifically say not to, or do they just not mention it?

it certainly isn't necessary for the proper operation of the bike. But I have always put a thin layer of grease on axles, and have never checked to see what the manuals say. Right or wrong, I hate having to drive out rusted axles with a pin punch and hammer. (and they do rust.)

If somebody can give me a good reason not to, I will certainly stop recommending it. I suppose a dry axle could be important for clamping purposes. I have never had a problem yet, but that doesn't make it right.

In the Honda Service Manual there is no mention of putting grease on the front axle pin, but on the other hand it doesn't say not to do it either. As Greg stated, it does say to grease the dust seals. Fred H. what say you on the subject?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Honda recommends no lube on the front axle pin. When I remove them and find grease/oil on them, I wipe them dry before reinstalling them. The grease seals require lube.
Greg, I know you repair Wings for a living. Have you ever seen anything bad as a result of greasing the Front Axle? I greased it also because it seemed like it did not bind as much the last inch or so where the fatter part enters on the left side of the wheel. Will it cause the axle to spin inside of the bearings instead of the bearings to spin with the axle? I believe you can flat spot wheel bearing on a car by putting to much grease on them and they do not roll. I am putting everything together now.

I had to take the secondary master cylinder off the left fork because it the plunger pulled to far down due to my error. I thought I was going to have to rebuild it because it would not compress and let the left disc line up properly with its lower mounting hole. Once I got it off it compresses. Had I known that it was hydraulic pressure preventing it from compressing, I could have loosened an oil bolt and relieved the pressure. Oh well, it keeps going on and I keep learning how to dissasemble more of the bike each time I do something to it.
 

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To keep in perspective what is in the manual, Honda also says to replace brake pads with the front wheel installed. I can tell you with first hand experience that this is a bad idea, unless of course you want to end up throwing out a shoulder muscle trying to compress the pistons like I did.
 

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In the busy season, I help with setup at my dealer. Honda/ Yamaha, both say to grease the axle before installation. In the older GW's, esp the 1200 rear, the humidity and heat would corrode and rust the axle in the open spot where it did not contact the bearings. The problem then is you have to pull the axle back through those close tolerances on the bearings. LIGHT coat of grease on all axles.
 

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After you put the axle through everything and torque the bolt, nothing will be able to spin on the axle. It all gets locked together (collars and inner race of bearings to the axle), almost as if you had put the axle inside a tube, and torqued the bolt. A film of grease on the axle is no longer a factor. It is then up to the forks to hold the whole assembly in the correct position.

The manual does not explain every detail, a little common sense, helps.
 
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Greasing the axle doesn't hurt anything however I see no reason why you would want to grease the axle as no parts actually ever rotate on the axle itself.
I suppose it would make it slightly easier to remove and replace :shrug:

Any vibration is tires, more specifically tire tread design. Perfectly normal in most cases.
Bearings almost never go bad. I think I replace one once many years ago but that was due to an owner over tightening the drive belt on his EH.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Bad front tire. I bought a set of E-3s used on this site. Never thought I would be taken but, I guess it had to happen sooner or later. Hopefully the seller did not know. Ordered a new tire today. It just keeps on going and going with this front tire issue. I guess the good thing is I can completely strip the forks if needed.
 

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Like Larry stated way above, the idea is to prevent rust on the axle. A search of long past threads on this board will reveal a post by Stu Oltman suggesting a very light coating of grease is appropriate for that purpose. A slight coat of paste wax wiped dry would be much the same. Greg is wiping off the heavy coats of grease he finds and the result is probably just about the right amount of residual to handle the intended job; that is, I don't think Gred would find any grease on my greased axle -- I put it on and wipe it off myself.

Regarding brake parts grease: I have to admit that I have changed pads without repacking the rubber boots on the slide pins. I do that abut every other set of pads; my bad, prolly should do it every time.

Larry, I still don't see any reason to remove the tire to change pads up front or rear. Pull the pad pin and the old pads fall out. Clean the exposed slave cylinder pistons and caliper sides with soft cloth on a paint stick or small tooth brush(the caliper will slide enough to give you room), then use the paint stick to pry the pistons into the caliper. Had to do pretty much just that the other day to get opossum remains out of the brakes, wheel spokes, inner fender, belly pan and all over the front cowl pats. Yuk! First time in years my bike has been this clean and waxed too! Possum fat makes her shine real good ;-)

prs
 

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'Possum fat

Yeah but the dang rabbit fur sticks to it! :cry:
 

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Larry, I still don't see any reason to remove the tire to change pads up front or rear.

prs
I see that you remember that thread. Call me stupid, stubborn, or whatever. I couldn't get those pistons compressed. (But I didn't know about the paint stick trick) I couldn't lift my right arm for 3 weeks after that brake job. I don't know what I did. But I really screwed it up..:22yikes:

But this is off topic. Let's give the thread back to the OP.
 
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