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When I replaced my front brakes at 16,000 miles, one side was worn more than the other.
So I replaced both sides and came up with an idea.
If I rode the bike 8,000 miles and then switched the pads to the other side they may wear more even.
So at 24,000 miles, I checked them and they were wearing more on one side than the other, so I switched them.
Now at 32,000 miles, I checked them and it looks like I got about the most wear anyone could safely.
I know some people get more wear out of their brakes, but I ride in the city a lot and use the brakes more often.
It works for me!
Wood Tints and shades Font Cuisine Clay
 

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I understand your logic and agree with it. However the real world mileage replacement has me puzzled as to the ultimate benefit. To sum it up, you replaced the pads at 16,000 miles. And you replaced them again at 32,000 miles (16,000 miles later). The only difference seems to be that they are worn more evenly during the same interval. Or am I missing something?
My commute is a lot of stop and go as well, so I go through front brake pads at roughly the same intervals.
 

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He swapped them (inside-outside) to allow for evening out the wear of the pads. I did the same thing on mine and a couple of other bikes.
 

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When I replaced my front brakes at 16,000 miles, one side was worn more than the other.
So I replaced both sides and came up with an idea.
If I rode the bike 8,000 miles and then switched the pads to the other side they may wear more even.
So at 24,000 miles, I checked them and they were wearing more on one side than the other, so I switched them.
Now at 32,000 miles, I checked them and it looks like I got about the most wear anyone could safely.
I know some people get more wear out of their brakes, but I ride in the city a lot and use the brakes more often.
It works for me!
View attachment 413331
You might try the NICHE pads, they wear better than the Honda pads, less than half the cost too.
 

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Quite a few have done this with the Gen-5 with no performance issues. It works, as long as one keeps an eye on their brake wear as we should with all maintenance.

Corventure Dave
 

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:unsure: Mmmmmmmm Good idea!
When's the last time yea changed that oil ~n~ filter (??)

Ronnie
1/23/23
 

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I changed my Brake pads out at ~26k but that was the fronts, my rear is still going strong at 30k. How is yours?
 

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He swapped them (inside-outside) to allow for evening out the wear of the pads. I did the same thing on mine and a couple of other bikes.
I understand that. What I don't get is why he didn't get more miles than he did the first time (16,000 miles) with no switching them. If it doesn't give any longer life, what's the point?
 

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IMHO brake pads need some 'run in' phase - would you agree?

Also: if brake pads had a 'run in phase' - wouldn't it take much longer to have a new 'brake in phase' for a different surface?

My conclusion and IMHO : it's not worth the costs reduction considering the security issue.
 

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+ 1 on the math. If he got 16,000 miles and one side wore unevenly, so he replaced them then;
then went 8K miles, switched the pads and got another 8K miles, which wore more evenly, even so, he still didn't increase the mileage of the pads. Are we all missing something here?
 

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He didn't switch out with new pads, he just switched sides with the old pads so he could even out the wear and thus fully use the entire pad set.
 

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When I replaced my front brakes at 16,000 miles, one side was worn more than the other.
So I replaced both sides and came up with an idea.
If I rode the bike 8,000 miles and then switched the pads to the other side they may wear more even.
So at 24,000 miles, I checked them and they were wearing more on one side than the other, so I switched them.
Now at 32,000 miles, I checked them and it looks like I got about the most wear anyone could safely...
Flyboy, maybe you can confirm what cha actually did. As I read your post carefully, I believe you made it clear that you replaced your pads at 16k, as Bob pointed out above. But as you can see, there's some confusion about that.
But you did not make it clear whether or not you replaced them again at 32k. You said that after installing new pads at 16k, and then rotating them to even out the wear 8k later, you got about the most wear "anyone could safely" get. I get that. But does that mean you were:

1) Simply happy with the wear you found at 32k, and left the second set in, or that...
2) The second set were worn out now and again are being replaced (which many of us assumed).
 

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+ 1 on the math. If he got 16,000 miles and one side wore unevenly, so he replaced them then;
then went 8K miles, switched the pads and got another 8K miles, which wore more evenly, even so, he still didn't increase the mileage of the pads. Are we all missing something here?
I think we are missing something here. I read it again, slowly and out loud.

He didn't replace the second set at 32000 on the odometer. Which is what I thought originally.

He replaced them after a total of 32000 miles, he doubled the life.
 

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What I get, at 16k for the first set of pads, he changed them out, from that point at 16k again, he moved them around, at 8k he did the move again, then at 8 k he checked them to see the wear, that gave him the 32k on a set of pads,
 
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