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It's exhausting correcting the damage hackers cause to a GW. Much of my time working on Wings is correcting or working around sh*tty workmanship. I am forever amazed at the damage they do. They constantly, miss-route, hang, string, dangle, twist, shove, break, and crack stuff. They even remove parts and fasteners and gromits and leave them off as if they where there for no reason. They never consider the damage they cause of future expense needed to correct their hacking.

I know many are heading to WingDing to have accessories installed and wish I could tell how to spot them. I would never have anyone work on my Wing that uses any sort of power tool. Even a battery operated screw driver. There is only one correct way to install a metal screw in plastic and a power driver is not one of them. Another one is someone who offers to hang something for the price of the accessory for free. That should really suspicious.

Most of those venders have nothing more then "lot lizzards" hanging parts. Lot lizzards are good for running parts, washing bikes, and breaking stuff the technisions have to correct. I hope you all buy the accessory and install it yourself and not have lizzards crawling all over you Wings creating future damage.
 

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It's not just bikes although I will say that there is many more fragile parts on a bike and with the tight space, routing of hoses and wires are critical to keep them from being pinched. My dad always referred to thse guys as butchers or as "Wally the wonder mechanic". That is way I do all of my own work on my cars and bikes.

It seems that shops often break as much as they fix. No offence intended since it's obvious that is your business. I know that there are quality shops out there but you never know and finding out by trial and error is a rough way to go.
 

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Greg,
I agree with you whole heartedly. Bikes come in our shop with missing grommets and push pins all the time. Wire bundles mis routed and pinched and hardly ever no soldering on electrical with mostly quick splices gone bad. We ask who did what and most can't tell us except it was done at such and such rally. We always replace missing parts and then when they pay the ticket they say well it had been OK without the missing part or piece. Now if we put it back the way it came in and they LOST the chrome piece that covers the oil dipstick and the coolant overflow bottle since these parts are now over $300 each they would be mad at us instead of the $5 grommets we installed. Most things we find is cross threaded seat bolts and broken tabs off the side covers.
 

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I agree with all except the electric screwdriver. They have saved me many a stripped screw on both my own work and student work. The common tendency is to over-tighten screws. I can't break myself of this, and sure don't have faith in others having the discipline. A properly adjusted (notice emphasis) electric clutch-type screwdriver prevents this.
 

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I got a saying "I hope who ever did this to your bike is still in Prison"
When they say "I did all that work" I then say go around the corner and kick your ass real good for doing this to a nice bike-I don't want to watch it! :eek:4:
 

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I trust my dealer to do anything but electrical work. If they install something with a wire, they do it with vampire clips and other substandard crap.

I've bought a new bike from them and been on the side of the road soldering **** together a week later.

But since I know that about them, I can make adjustments and we get along fine.
 

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Yep, I fell prey to the "pay retail for the accessories and we install for free" when I bought my Wing.
I litterally had to redo everything when I got home! You should have seen the wiring on my ring of fire. Wiring simply twisted together, no solder. Just taped, not shrink wrapped and not even totally taped in some places, bare wires exposed!
Master cylinder switch box installed(RH on LH side) with wires on the outside of the handle bar. Didn't bother to take the cover off and put the wires inside the handlebar.
3 tabs on the fairing trim broken.
By the way-this dealer went belly up a couple years ago!
 

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I agree with all except the electric screwdriver. They have saved me many a stripped screw on both my own work and student work. The common tendency is to over-tighten screws. I can't break myself of this, and sure don't have faith in others having the discipline. A properly adjusted (notice emphasis) electric clutch-type screwdriver prevents this.
Well I disagree with your disagreement.

No screw should EVER be put in with a power screwdriver.

The corect way especially on wings with clips over plastic or metal screws into plastic itself is to place the screw in the hole.Turn the screwdriver in reverse feeling for the screw/bolt to "Drop' off the inside threads.Then turn it clockwise. (try it and you'll see what I'm saying)
Then you will never strip a screw or start new threads in plastic.

I teach guys how to do it right so they don't screw up anything on their bikes in the future.

Dam fools at these rallys are always trying to get things done in a hurry.:wrong:

Take the time to do it right and your customer will respect you more in doing so.Time to start having more pride in the work we do as Americans-like the old days!
Not hurry up and get them the hell out of here-were busy.:22yikes:
 

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i don't use a power screwdriver on the wing but have to say one of the best wing mechanics i know uses one and his work is second to no one so i guess if u know what your doing and do it rite a power driver works fine :thumbup:

edit, u know after thinking about this i not sure but i think maybe he just uses the power driver for taking stuff apart, i never really paid that much attention, all i do know forsure is his work is outstanding :thumbup:
 

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My dad always referred to thse guys as butchers or as "Wally the wonder mechanic".

I always say they must have had it at mickey mouses garage for goofy to work on.

It takes longer sometimes to correct what was screwed up then to fix what was actually wrong with it.
 

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What amazes me (but doesn't surprise me) is that these same knuckleheads who run their bike under a tent in the middle of a parking lot to let some moron install stuff on their bikes, are usually the same ones who moan loud and long about never taking their bike into a Honda shop because they dont know what they're doing? :shrug:

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I agree with all except the electric screwdriver. They have saved me many a stripped screw on both my own work and student work. The common tendency is to over-tighten screws. I can't break myself of this, and sure don't have faith in others having the discipline. A properly adjusted (notice emphasis) electric clutch-type screwdriver prevents this.
I know how that is vicariously. I had a boss that was like that. At 50 years of age he still hadn't got the hang of tightening down a fastener without damage. I'd say,"Larry, when you hear cracking and see splinters flying off the work it means that further tightening is not necessary."
 

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Greg, would you like to help me straighten up the rats nest of wiring I have created under my left fairing pocket? Actually, to be honest, I was in such a hurrry to switch out my roady XM for the Zumo 665 and get it all hooked up to the J&M CFRG for my big trip in May (the night before I was supposed to head out), that the rats nest has moved INTO the fairing pocket. I have to completely reorganize all the wiring this summer...after I reorganize my apartment, which looks like a group of badgers were hibernating there over the winter.
 

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I've never had anything installed at a show or rally but I have always thought to myself; how good can the work be if they are trying to squeeze in 2 weeks worth of work in 3 days with folks asking questions in the heat and with owners who want it on the bike and ready to ride asap? I do like to watch and observe though, since it affords me a look at parts of my bike I may have never seen before as well as seeing how things attach (which sometimes concerns me too) and in general the overall care, or lack thereof of the installer.

It would seem that care should be taken as well as common sense in that you really can't properly install everything at a rally; hand wings under the mirror (one screw out, one new fastener in) OK, but ring of fire or other wiring/body panel removal related items; maybe not.

This is not a slam against the vendors but sometimes you have to be cautious with your pride and joy. :cool:
 
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The common tendency is to over-tighten screws.
For me this is #1 in the book and it applies to the entire spectrum of mechanic - even the "pros" In fact shop mechanics can be some of the worst!
I am forever amazed at the amount of torque applied to screws that hold plastic together. The results are cracked plastic and the need to drill, punch and chisel screws and bolt apart. I have a 36" breaker bar which I used to loosen wheel nuts and axle nuts.
This is why a cringe when I see posting of changing oil every 3k or plugs at only 20k - more stripped and damage threads for sure.

On the plus side - heli coil manufactures have to eat too :cool:
 

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I'm completely happy with the shoddy workmanship. Its wayyy better than me doing my own. :thumbup:
Some of us know that and I am one of them
Im pretty happy with someone doing the wrenching besides me
Funny stuff!
The problem with some of these mechanic/technician/shade-tree-butcher bashing threads is that it sometimes instills a false sense of can-do in those who have no business being on the end of any tool, power or otherwise.
Some people just don't have the mechanical aptitude to hang a picture. Sure it hurts when you pay someone to screw up your prize machine, but never underestimate the destructive ability of a proud owner with lots of pride and little aptitude.
 
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There is the thing about knowing just enough to be dangerous. Most people really are not very mechanical so they take there cars and bike to a shop. This is good. Some are gifted and do all there own work and design. This is also good. However those in between learn how to change oil which they now do daily. This type is easy to pick out, they are the ones who can "feel" oil, imagine belly pans reduce wind forces, install fork braces and a whole host of imaginary improvements. Typically in this relm there is also no such thing as to tight or enough additives for the job.
But it takes all kinds and this is part of the package. Best thing is to own a flame wrench and breaker bar is what I always say sometimes. ;)
 

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Funny stuff!
The problem with some of these mechanic/technician/shade-tree-butcher bashing threads is that it sometimes instills a false sense of can-do in those who have no business being on the end of any tool, power or otherwise.
]
This is one of the most true statements I've read in a long time.
Some of the worst workmanship I've seen is by owner do it youself'ers..
 
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