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Top of the line $500 Schuberth Concept flip front helmet.
This was a highway speed wreck and the guy did not hit anything but the ground.
If he had of hit the curb after hitting the ground, he'd be permanently drinking through a straw right now.







I may have to rethink my helmet choice. :shrug:
 

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Those are supposed to be good helmets. They have the price tag to prove it. I researched everything I could find, and it wasn't much, on how flip lids held up in a crash. My own assumption was if the companies weren't willing to subject them to SNELL testing or make one that I couldn't easily rip open with one hand on the bar and one on the helmet then I really didn't trust it on my noggin. Yes I got a lot of nasty looks in bike shops for doing my open test.
On the other hand it held together enough to do the job by the way you talk so good for him. I will stick to the conventional fixed chin bar FF helmet. :popcorn:
 

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...My own assumption was if the companies weren't willing to subject them to SNELL testing or make one that I couldn't easily rip open with one hand on the bar and one on the helmet then I really didn't trust it on my noggin.
Just a note.... it's my understanding that Snell refuses to test Flip-Front Helmets.
 

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I don't think I will be wearing my 1/2 helmet anytime soon, if ever!

Shadow1

Hal
 

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This past July, one of my riding buddies hit a deer at 60 mph and it threw him off his bike onto his head. He was wearing a Nolan flip face helmet that stayed intact - albeit it was cracked in 3 places and knocked him unconscious for several minutes. The helmet held up fantastic though and did its job. For what its worth, he had gear on every part of his body except his legs. Gear was shredded to bits - his bluejeans were too. His left leg had the most damage....
 

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This past July, one of my riding buddies hit a deer at 60 mph and it threw him off his bike onto his head. He was wearing a Nolan flip face helmet that stayed intact - albeit it was cracked in 3 places and knocked him unconscious for several minutes. The helmet held up fantastic though and did its job. For what its worth, he had gear on every part of his body except his legs. Gear was shredded to bits - his bluejeans were too. His left leg had the most damage....

While commuting to work in DFW (Irving) early A.M. about a month ago, my brother was struck from the rear just before exiting highway 12. He was doing about 50 and the person who hit him was doing around 70. He was thrown up into the air about 15 feet and landed at least 50 feet forward, maybe more. Was wearing HJC modular. He landed on his chin and hands. Broke both wrists - probably saved his life. The helmet stayed intact from the presumably hard hit. The screen popped out and that was it. He was riding a relatively light machine (Triumph Tiger) and it was totaled. He did sell it for parts. About the only thing salvageable are his Sidi On-Road Simpatex boots, which he is giving me. Not even a scratch on the boots, which indicates how he landed. He won't be needing the boots anymore, since he lost his 'kitchen pass' to ride and he completely agrees with the family. God gave him a chance he said and he doesn't want to blow it. I don't disagree, since he is very lucky to be alive. He also was laying between two lanes of traffic passed out for 5 minutes and only the lady in front of him stopped and helped him. He could easily have been run over.

For those of you who live or pass through Irving TX, I think it happened around 6:00 A.M. Friday the 9th of January. They did close down the highway for a period of time. Such a shame, as he had just returned to riding and he probably will never do it again, through no fault of his own. :cry:

Anyhow, I'm a believer in modulars at the minimum all the time. Except around the block. I have worn 1/2 and 3/4 helmets, but not for at least 10 years. I have two Nolans and plan to purchase the n103 this spring. As far as the Snell rating goes, I don't really care about that. DOT approval is good enough for me. When was the last time anyone has seen helmets advertised in motomags that weren't at least DOT approved?

p.s. I went down last July on a gravel road between Dawson City Yukon and Chicken Alaska. Was wearing a Nolan Trend and it saved my coconut. Was riding the V-Strom at the time.
 

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I dont believe their helmets are SNELL or DOT approved and therefore are illegal and considered novelty helmets. Expensive novelty helmets. Europe has different standards than the US. I dont know if their certification is less stringent than ours, but I hope that it a least equal ours. When on their website, I typed in DOT and SNELL in the search box and nothing came up. The new Schuberth C3 (after conversion) is $625. And just because Michael Schumacher wears one, doesnt make it a safe one. I looked at that helmet a few weeks ago and decided against it due to the lack of US certification and the fact that it is way over priced. For those that are interested, heres their site.

http://www.schuberth.com/
 

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2 things immediately spring to mind

1. Schu's helmet will not be a standard 'buy off the shelf' like you get.

2. Schu starts both names, hmmmmmm, has he some company interest? board member maybe?
 

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I suspect one would have to land kind of perfect to snap off that front piece but at least it took the first blow and protected the rider. Better than no protection up front such as the open face helmets. At this point, I'm not ready to write off the flip face helmets because they ARE an improvement on the open face helmets. Of course, full face is best but some times folks don't wear them because its too hot or don't like the closed in feeling.....and any helmet is better than no helmet.
 

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Just a note.... it's my understanding that Snell refuses to test Flip-Front Helmets.
No, it's just that no manufacturer has submitedt to testing for the cert because they would fail...

You can always find a failure of equipment given the right (or wrong) circumstances.. No gear makes you immune to injury.. It's obvious that a 3/4 is better than a half, a flip is better than a 3/4 and a FF is better than a flip.. Buy quality gear that you always wear but understand you are still likely to get sevearly injured in a crash..
The best protection is to not be involved in a crash by always having an alert and well trained mind..
 

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No, it's just that no manufacturer has submitedt to testing for the cert because they would fail...

You can always find a failure of equipment given the right (or wrong) circumstances.. No gear makes you immune to injury.. It's obvious that a 3/4 is better than a half, a flip is better than a 3/4 and a FF is better than a flip.. Buy quality gear that you always wear but understand you are still likely to get sevearly injured in a crash..
The best protection is to not be involved in a crash by always having an alert and well trained mind..
Very well said!:agree:
 

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Nolan N102 here..... hit a deer at over 55 mph..... ruined riding gear..ruined helmet....no road rash no face trauma....went right out and bought a new one (with ins. co.'s money) ... Like the flip front because I don't have to take it off to talk at a gas sta. or stop light and I can keep my glasses on and put the helmet on or take it off.....without breaking bows ..... joy
 

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A higher price doesn't always mean a safer helmet. There are $100 helmets out there that test to be safer than several 300-500 dollar helmets. The high dollar lids are lighter, have replaceable liners and a lot of other bells & whistles, but the price doesn't necessarily make them any safer.
 

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I believe most of them are DOT...but never Snell approved...infact on most of those flips have a warning imprinted on them that they are NOT completely safe.

On a HJC... I looked at had this warning... Sorry but I will never own one...after going down 2 yrs ago , my first point of contact was my chin area on the concrete...which is majority of the time in most instances.
 

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I don't know about any other modular helmet but the Nolan's are ECE certified. Which is Europe's helmet standards.

I remember visiting the SNELL testing place and they said the reason modular helmets aren't tested is because the chin bar might pop off in a frontal impact. Most (if not all) modular helmets have the newer ECE standards.

This explains the different standards. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motorcycle_helmet

The Snell Memorial Foundation has developed stricter requirements and testing procedures for motorcycle helmets with racing in mind, as well as helmets for other activities (e.g. drag racing, bicycling, horseback riding), and many riders in North America consider Snell certification a benefit when considering buying a helmet while others note that its standards allow for more force (g's) to be transferred to a rider's head than the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) standard.[5] However, the DOT standard does not test the chin bar of helmets with them,[6] while the Snell (and ECE) standards do.
 

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Dress for the Accident and Not for the Ride!

I know that I should wear a full face, however I am most comfortable in a 3/4 open face. I guess this is all part of my Risk Management!

Bulldog
 

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Bulldog,
I get this as a gripe that the helmet didn't hold up to the expectations that were made. I opt for full coverage and as stated earlier I have been asked to leave shops over checking to see how well the latches hold. Looks like the chin bar completly broke off. the hinges are in tact and I cant see the latches so for argument lets say they held. I doubt it from my non-scientific eperience ,but lets say they did.
Some say SNELL is too hard a shell and will end up causing more trouble than its worth and that is a whole different debate that can't be won by either side. Kinda like to wear or not to wear.
If you opt for the protection that this type helmet says it can provide though I think it should hold up. The way Yellow Glide talks his friend fared well and it did the job just not well enough to make him want to put his head in one.
I'll stop rambling but good pics. I haven't seen one off some ones head before. I've seen a couple protecting sissy bars that didn't look this good though.
 

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Agree that we could all discuss/debate/argue all day about helmets. At the end of the day, it comes down to exactly what the Bulldog said:

Personal Risk Management

We're all big boys & girls (some of us biger than others :oops: ), and we're old enough to make our own decisions.

I agree with Dave that the best defense is to use what's under the helmet to avoid the unexpected... and yet in rare instances, sometimes even that just isn't enough.

I've gone through the entire progression since I began riding in my 20's. Began with an el-cheapo full-face... moved to a 1/2 "beanie" helmet when I thought it was 'cool'... then to an Arai 3/4m but only because I wanted a headset with the Wing... back to a full-face when I decided I wanted something with a little more protection (this time a nice Shoei)... and finally tried a Nolan flip-face for the convenience.

Well I admit it: I just don't want to be 'closed in' inside of a standard full face or flip-front helmet. The front of these helmets are so close to my face & chin that if seems like my eyelashes are brushing the visor when I blink. They're just too claustophopic for me. When I ride, I wanna feel the air on my face. If I'm gonna be closed in and lose the sensations around me, I may as well be riding in a car.

I toyed around with, and actually bought an NFL-type face-guard that I was going to have riveted to the front of an Arai 3/4 helmet. I mean... I like the open-face type helmet, but like the idea of not riding the asphalt on my face if I should ever go down too. So why not have an open face 3/4 helmet with a quaterback-like chin guard just to act as 'forward roll bar' to keep my face off the deck?

Well... right before I went and butchered that Arai helmet, I saw coolhand's post on here last year about Shoei's new line of "dual sport" helmets, called the Hornet DS. After a bit of questioning, I decided to try one... and it's the best thing I ever did.



It's light-weight, has a larger opening than a regular off-road helmet, and you can use it with the visor up or even removed if you want. And since the chin guard is far forward of my face, the visor doesn't give me that claustophobic sensation in the closed position.

Anyway... just thought I'd give my thoughts on my current lid, if anyone cares. I understand that Arai makes a DS type helment now too... but as I haven't been able to try it out on the road, I can't comment on it good or bad.

:cool:
 

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I wear a shorty and have for 35 years. Was a motor officer and that's all we had and now I just prefer it to either a FF or 3/4 shell .... That said, I fully concur with the sage advise herein which calls for all y'all to wear nothing less than a FF. Case in point: Was traveling from Dallas to Mt. Rushmore last year with a seasoned rider who was a helmetless, jeans & t-shirt type. Before the trip I forced him to borrow one of my mesh jackets and told him to go out and buy a damn helmet or we ain't going. It was his life's dream to see Rushmore.

The fellow showed up for the trip with good boots, mechanics gloves and a new Nolan 102. We were precisely 602 miles north of Dallas when his Valkyrie experienced catastrophic rear tire failure. We were passing a slow moving vehicle on a Kansas farm road at about 75 when the next thing I see in my rear view is his bike 35 feet in the air twisting in all sorts of wierd gyrations. My first thought: He's dead! How am I going to tell his wife ...

From my years as an accident investigator and reconstructionist I deduced that the accident was not survivable at that speed. I executed a U-Turn and returned to the bike's point of rest to look for his body. Gear and parts were scattered all over the Kansas highway. The rear tire carcass was totally separated from the rim. The initial point of impact appeared to be on the left side which physics would have had him catapulted west of the road way. I started looking for him in the cornfields.

Then I noticed stopped vehicles and several folks gathering some 75 feet back down the road way, but on the east side of the road. Can't be. As I made my way over to the group I saw my friend and riding buddy .... standing up in the corn field. Bottom line, he survived. His boots were scuffed, the First Gear mesh jacket was shreaded (not melted) from sliding on the asphalt, the protective panels taking the brunt of the road rash, and the helmet .... deep gouging on the left front chin bar suggest it was one of the initial points of impact. The mechanics gloves were also shredded but did not wear through to the skin. He recieved some memorable road rash to his knees, broke his left wrist and left ankle, and survived.

I'd have to wax religiously with you to try to explain why he was 100 feet away from where he was suppose to land and on the opposite side of the road. Needless to say he now carries a couple of extra roserys.

Oh, and the tire: He had just had a brand new Metzler installed the day before. We checked tires every other gas stop with the most recent being about 30 miles back. The valve stem was not recovered which suggest that the offending dealer did not replace or properly secure the valve stem when they replaced the tire. We're going to trial with Metzler and the dealership this summer.
 
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